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  • MAC702
    replied
    I completely agree with JD and did that exact same thing. I started with a DeWalt 2 "HP" 4-gal, rollcage model and thank goodness it was 100% duty cycle because when running it with the cup gun for painting or when using the Spectrum 375 plasma cutter.

    Later I got the 7 "HP" 60-gal. for the shop and still kept the DeWalt in the truck.

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  • fun4now
    replied
    if you want air for a shop a real compresser is the way to go, its always nice to have a small one to take places but the shop realy need a good one. get a small one to build it and a big one when its built.

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  • JD in Socal
    replied
    Everyone that likes tools should have at least 2 compressors.

    If you need to run nail guns now, go buy a little pancake or hotdog compressor that runs on 110 and you can pick up with 1 hand. If you don't already have the nail guns, you can find package deals most of the time with the compressor and 1 - 3 nail guns included, at a price that is about the same as the compressor alone. That will do what you need now and will always be available to take to a job away from home/shop. When you need it, buy a bigger, bolted-down 220v unit to run all the bigger stuff.

    I have a Quincy 2-stage, true 5 hp, stand-up unit that I got through HF for only $800 and something. It puts out 16 cfm at 100 psi and 15 cfm at 100 psi. Its a great unit and is of true industrial quality. I would buy it again in a heartbeat. I don't know if HF still sells this unit, even though it was only a year or so ago that I bought it.

    I'm with you about over-buying tools, but this is something that you'll eventually want 2 of, so you can get the small one first and not lose anything.

    JD

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  • monte55
    replied
    Like I said before, figure on what air tools you will be using and how much air
    they need to operate and that should be starting point. A small 110 unit will inflate tires,operate a paint gun, some inpact tools but when it comes to air sanders you are going to have real problems. You could get a small air compressor and go electric with sanders itc. I love the Sears tool dept.Many
    times I'm there and see someone checking out compressors. After seeing what looks like a confused look on their face, I try to help. Almost always they are shopping price and not their needs after asking them what they will
    operate. Bright labels, horsepower claims, pretty packaging and a really neat accessory pack to fill a beach ball does not make it a good choice for a shop
    enviroment .

    Leave a comment:


  • Coalsmoke
    replied
    Originally posted by TheRealSpinner
    I just talked to my dad and he was saying that he thinks I should get a smaller compressor that is actually able to be transported so that we can actually use it at other properties if need be. Since I really do want to use it for autobody and paint in the future, is a smaller compressor going to be big enough, it might have to be 110V also. I'm just worried about it, I always like to over-buy and he likes to budget. Maybe I should just builed a crane to move the compressor when it needs to be moved.

    precisionworks, I checked out those links, I think I like the eaton compressor the best, thanks for the links.
    sort of, but it will blow your budget all to ****, and, you'll still need at least a cherry picker to move it. Buy the compressor that will suit your needs 90% of the time. If once a yaer you need to go portable, buy an additional little guy (ie hotdog or pancake compressor) and be patient

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  • TheRealSpinner
    replied
    I just talked to my dad and he was saying that he thinks I should get a smaller compressor that is actually able to be transported so that we can actually use it at other properties if need be. Since I really do want to use it for autobody and paint in the future, is a smaller compressor going to be big enough, it might have to be 110V also. I'm just worried about it, I always like to over-buy and he likes to budget. Maybe I should just builed a crane to move the compressor when it needs to be moved.

    precisionworks, I checked out those links, I think I like the eaton compressor the best, thanks for the links.

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    also spend the extra $2.00 and use synthetic oil in it you only change it once a year so give it the good stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    FWIW:
    i got the husky 220V 5hp 60 gal 135 psi from home depot a little over a year ago and love it. plenty for my die grinders and cut off tools as well as my impacts for the car. it was like $400.00 it's just a relabled camble hosefield ( i think) and tractor suply caries the camble for the same $$ with the gages already on it ( save you a few $$) its a little noisy but not too bad. at $400 its a good air suply and you can put the other $600 wtard welding suplies and tools.

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  • Wisner955
    replied
    Stages is just that. Single stage compresses the air once and usually outputs a maximum of 125-135PSI. A TWO stage compresses the air twice and usually outputs at 175PSI.

    I use a SINGLE stage IR SS5L5, 135psi max, 18CFM @90 PSI. This one is $800 to your door from Northern. Works great for everything I need as a hobbyist.

    Paul

    Leave a comment:


  • TheRealSpinner
    replied
    Originally posted by monte55
    By the way it shouldn't cost that much more to widen the 12' width of your new shop. It would be nice to bring in a car and be able to open the doors without moving tools etc.
    I actually am building myself another bedroom detached from the house. That size is the largest that will fit-6 feet from my 1.5 car garage (workshop) and 3 feet from the fence. I will be living in there and using the main house for kitchen and bathroom, it's the only way I can live with roomates (they will be paying 3/4 of the mortgage)

    BTW, what is with all the different stage compressors, does that refer to the different speeds that they run at?

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  • precisionworks
    replied
    ...using it more for automotive pneumatic tools ... such as impact wrench, die grinder, etc.
    Now you've opened Pandora's Box Tools like air nailers are easy on consumption, even the tiny pancake units supply adequate air. Automotive tools are a different story.

    The typical 1/2" impact, like an IR2135, uses 24CFM under full load. A 3/4" impact like an IR2141, needs 40CFM. To be fair, these tools tend to run for only seconds at a time, so a compressor rated at half the CFM will do.

    Die grinders. Tiny, handy, can't live without a few. I wouldn't trade my IR3108 for anything else, but it needs 18CFM. Unless your pump puts out that much or more, it won't be able to maintain the pressure needed to run that tool for very long. DA Air Sanders are similar, around 15CFM.

    Get as much as your budget will allow. You will find the need for more air at some point.
    "Buy more compressor than you need" isn't bad advice. There are lots of good ones to choose from. The Bel Aire 218V is close to your price range: http://www.shop.com/op/~Two_Stage_Ai...0?sourceid=298

    Eaton makes an excellent unit: http://www.eatoncompressor.com/catal...747/172993.htm

    Quincy has the QTV54:http://chreed.com/quincy/pdf_files/QTV54Brochure.pdf

    And Ingersoll has the 2340N5 (free shipping from Northern) http://www2.northerntool.com/product..._200318501.htm

    Pick one you like, you won't go wrong with any of those four

    Leave a comment:


  • monte55
    replied
    I purchaced a 60 gal single stage compressor-5 or 6 hp depending what stickers they were using that day---go by SCFM-it is the only thing that really counts-mine will put out approx 13-14 SCFM at 90 psi. Most air tools are designed to operate at this pressure. I have never felt the need for a two stage for the higher pressure alone. If one operator only is using this size
    unit it should be fine with most tools. Air sanders use a lot of air. Quality air tools are more efficient with the same amount of available air. If you want more than one tool to operate at a time you need to do some homework. If you have a Sears catalogue, in the air tool section there is a table for air tool comsumption.Very helpful. Get as much as your budget will allow. You will find the need for more air at some point. I got mine in 1995 and it won't quit. It cost $389. It is the oil type. You can still get one for about that price today. When it dies I'll probable go to 2 stage 80 gallon.
    What kind of milling do you intend to do. Maybe a milldrill will suit you.
    By the way it shouldn't cost that much more to widen the 12' width of your new shop. It would be nice to bring in a car and be able to open the doors
    without moving tools etc. You won't be sorry you did.When I built my first home shop I thought 24 x36 would be good.It was for a short while. They look spacious untill you put your stuff in them. I have added to my shop 5 times. Never have enough room. good luck

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  • POWERSTROKE
    replied
    A full 5 HP 2-stage on a 60 gal. tank @ 15 CFM @ 175 psi just exactly fits your description and budget....IR is good but Campbell Hausfeld makes a decent compressor too. I bought a 7.5 HP 80 gal. Porter-Cable but Northern Tools & Hydraulics shows the same compressor as their "House Brand" in their catalog. I would not suggest anything "Oilless" due to noise. You don't need that much compressor to run a nailer but when You start running impacts, die grinders, etc. and maybe spraying some paint You will.

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  • Coalsmoke
    replied
    Originally posted by TheRealSpinner
    What about a milling machine, anybody think I could get away with a purchase like that?
    if you start up your own business, you can "get away" with all this stuff, but, you soon realize that just because it can be written off doesn't mean that it still won't come out of your pocket.

    as for the compressor, it all depends really on your forseable needs. but, for the average hobbiest, a single stage, multi cylinder, in the 4-5hp range and between 13-18cfm at 120psi with a max psi of ~140-150psi will be plenty adaquate and run you right around teh $1000 range, depending of course on who puts their "name brand" label on it.

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  • TheRealSpinner
    started a topic Air Compressor

    Air Compressor

    I am going to be building a (small, 12x21 ft) building on the property that my father owns. Since tools will be written off in taxes, I figure this is the time to buy an air compressor (for building reasons of course --nail gun).

    I obviously want it for other purposes afterwards, but wasn't sure which size or brand to purchase. I plan on keeping it for a while, and using it more for automotive pneumatic tools after the build such as impact wrench, die grinder, etc.

    I would imagine that $1000 would be plenty of money to spend, I don't know what the limit is though. I have 240V in the garage which is 6ft. away from the future building, so stationary is fine, I would just need long hoses.

    What about a milling machine, anybody think I could get away with a purchase like that?
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