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  • #16
    Originally posted by Sundown
    Mine is 30" X 40" X 1/2", I have about $75 tied up in it and so far it's proved to be just the right size for me.
    Sundown, what brand of bender is that in the back ground?
    http://groups.msn.com/ArcAlaskaWelding
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    • #17
      Originally posted by arcalaska
      Sundown, what brand of bender is that in the back ground?
      Don't know the brand but I purchased it here http://cgi.ebay.com/Sheet-Metal-Pede...QQcmdZViewItem works good for the price.
      Regards, George

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      • #18
        tig table

        About 10 years ago I had a piece of 3/4 inch thick steel 48 " by 48" blanchard ground flat to .025 - the whole thing cost about $325. My boss thought that was too much money for a table, so I bought it with my own $ and it now sits in my shop. I made the frame for it out of 2" X2" steel tube with real heavy duty castors, and offset the frame 6 inches in from the edge for clamping purposes - I only use it for tigging and layout work so it will stay flat...I just recentlly got another one for my day job - 36" X 36" 3/4" thick blanchard ground both sides - within .010 - this one cost $720 (cost of steel and electricity to grind it flat really went up) - but it really makes all the difference when you want to make things out of square tubing and want them to be square when you are done...I have it mounted on a hydraulic lift so that I can really get comfortable when tigging ( comfort equals high quality welds!!) - A quality table will pay off in the long run.
        Nunzio1

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        • #19
          Well at the moment I only have some plywood for a table (really sad I know) but, been a person who weldes for a living I've seen a few tables and in the field I'll come across 1/2" and 5/8" which is nice but, you can really tell the difference when your on 1" and up with wholes drilled for the dogs. I probably don't have a table yet because I just haven't had the bucks to spend on a 1" 4x8 sheet yet and it's not big on my list. I've made due with my plywood quite well.

          weldaround.......

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Nunzio1
            About 10 years ago I had a piece of 3/4 inch thick steel 48 " by 48" blanchard ground flat to .025 - the whole thing cost about $325. My boss thought that was too much money for a table, so I bought it with my own $ and it now sits in my shop. I made the frame for it out of 2" X2" steel tube with real heavy duty castors, and offset the frame 6 inches in from the edge for clamping purposes - I only use it for tigging and layout work so it will stay flat...I just recentlly got another one for my day job - 36" X 36" 3/4" thick blanchard ground both sides - within .010 - this one cost $720 (cost of steel and electricity to grind it flat really went up) - but it really makes all the difference when you want to make things out of square tubing and want them to be square when you are done...I have it mounted on a hydraulic lift so that I can really get comfortable when tigging ( comfort equals high quality welds!!) - A quality table will pay off in the long run.
            Nunzio1, Do you have any pics of your table(s) you could post?

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            • #21
              Originally posted by arcalaska
              Sundown, what brand of bender is that in the back ground?
              Here is the original

              http://www.shopoutfitters.com/RingRolling.html
              www.ShopOutfitters.com

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              • #22
                re

                I don't know what to say to this..

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                • #23
                  The table top is directly related to what you are going to use it for. If you are just doing light gauge welding and the table is just a place to lay it out and tack it up then 3/8: or 1/2" is fine but if you are going to clamp down heavy weldments and use the table to help control movement (warping), or if you are going to use the table to tack temporary fixtures of jigs to you will want a heavy table. otherwise after a few years of welding things to the top and cutting them off the top will no longer be even close to flat.

                  The thickness of the top in my opinion is not about how much weight it will hold without warping but about staying flat after years of use/abuse. 1/4" or 3/8" can easily be bent when pounding on something.

                  Just my $.02
                  Bruce

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                  • #24
                    We had several different table sizes/thicknesses at work until Hurricane Katrina (New Orleans machine shop). The clean up crew hired to clean out took everything they could move. They left us with 1 table that is 36"x60" with a 3/4" top and our sheet metal table which is 48"x96" with a 2" top with 2" plate beveled down the sides for about 8". The table weighs too much to move easily and came out of a NASA production facility. It was originally our sheet metal table but has become our all purpose welding, sheetmetal, work bench, etc table. The picture attached is of the second table. The rust is not too bad considering it was under 5 feet of water for a week and it does appear that it will clean up with a flap disc.

                    The table is overkill for most uses but you can tack fixtures on it and beat on it all you want with no ill effect on the table.
                    Attached Files

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                    • #25
                      One day I found a 1.25" thick x 48" x 48" slab-o-steel that I picked up for next to nothing.
                      After I got it back to the shop and flipped it over, lo and behold, I discovered it was blanchard ground!

                      I also found a heavy duty stand and sweet heavy duty castors to accomodate it.

                      To complement this I have a 36" x 36" cast iron table top that is mounted to a hydraulic lift. This is VERY nice, as it afford you comfortability when you need it most.

                      Bottom line: try to get the sweetest deal you can, but buy as thick of a top as you can realistically afford. This is one area you will not regret it.

                      Good luck.
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                      • #26
                        Would the best place to find a Blanchard ground piece of steel like that be a scrapyard, or are there other places y'all have found them at? (unfortunately I don't have access to any NASA facilities... ) I have some ridiculously heavy duty castors, which could support _any_ table top I might come across, so it's only a matter of a) deciding on the best size for it, and then b) actually finding the piece to build it. I would like it to be at least an inch thick, and more if possible. I was thinking maybe 48 x 48", or maybe 48 x 60", that seems to be a pretty popular size? Time to start looking, and hopefully will luck into something affordable.

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                        • #27
                          I built a table last year finally. It is 4x8 with 2x3 square tubing and I put a 1/4 top on it and braced it every two and half feet underneath. Then tied all the legs together. I probably have 400.00 in it but it will last a long time. I have had no trouble with the top only being 1/4. I guess it is due to bracing underneath as much as I did. I had a scrap piece of table left and I just laid it on top of the table in one section and I weld on it some. I only problem is it weighs so much you can't move it. I had to use a forklift to put it in the shop. I figure I could set a car on it and it would support it easily.

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                          • #28
                            I'm new here, so pardon my jumping in like this.

                            Steel tables are rarely flat, and get worse with use unless the top is really thick, even then, grinding the spatter away creates shallows and dips- and I hate to grind things anyway. I use a steel frame with a double thickness of 3/4 ply as a top- I laminate the ply "back to back" which counteracts the twist in the sheet. I also leave enough room on the edges, 4 inches to the top framing all around, to sneak a visegrip clamp in as far as it will go. When the top gets used to the point it needs to be replaced, I do just that. I attach the top with #10-12 sheet metal screws and counter sink the heads. I weld a 5/8 or larger nut on the bottom of two adjacent legs, and run a bolt through them, this allows you to run one of them down to meet the floor, which prevents the table from rocking. The weight the table will take is a factor of the framing- I've made these out of whatever steel was available.

                            I also add a four plug receptacle to it somewhere out of the way so I'm not tangled up in extension cords.

                            If clamping holes are needed, I cut them with a jig or hole saw, I make fixtures on it by sheetrock-screwing blocks of wood to it with a cordless drill.

                            I find it faster and less frustrating using the above method- however, the ply does burn. It can be fireproofed with sodium silicate, but I don't do this. The piece can be tacked on the table, then finish welded off or above the top surface to avoid the toasting effect, also.

                            If the table, like mine, is for personal use, I make the heighth to that of my belt or bit higher so I'm not leaning over the work and killing my back.

                            If the table is for personal use, this is the way I go- if it was for use in a commercial shop, probably not.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by IA52 Glenn
                              Steel tables are rarely flat, and get worse with use unless the top is really thick, even then, grinding the spatter away creates shallows and dips- and I hate to grind things anyway.
                              Glenn, i have found that a 7" grinder with the guard trimmed using the hubbed wheels works great for removing tack welds or spatter from the bench top. simply trim the guard so the wheel makes complete contact when laid flat and fire it up. this method wouldn't be OSHA approved but it keeps the thick plate of my bench in tip top condition with no gouges or dips.
                              The one that dies with the most tools wins

                              If it's worth having, it's worth working for

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                              • #30
                                I ended up building one 4x8 table out of 1/2" steel with 3x3 supports underneath.

                                I used some big guys and clamps to pull the sheet a little straighter and tack it to the 3x3 tube. I built it up side down on the floor. I'm using it now to build some alum ramps, being able to clamp everything up on the table is great. Still working on finishing touches, will post pics when done.

                                I payed about $375 for the 1/2" sheet. Having them cut it down to anything smaller just wasn't worth it. A 3x6 would have still been $300.

                                I got some nice casters from www.castercity.com
                                Justin Starkey
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