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Help For First Timer With Tig Inverter

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  • RoydRage
    replied
    Toolbox

    Originally posted by Wheels
    To quote the old guy on Everybody Loves Raymond.........HOLY CRAP

    Nice stuff Tony, thanks for the green hue in my skin this morning.


    Mike

    Thanks Mike...

    I told you I was ****... It's just a Racer mentality you just go at everything all out.

    Now with everyone's help here, I hope to get my welding ablity up to match, I did a lot of research, and Dynasty 300DX Runner seemed to be the best thing out there, So if I fail... I have no excuse...

    Don't let me fail guys!

    Thanks, Tony

    Leave a comment:


  • Wheels
    replied
    To quote the old guy on Everybody Loves Raymond.........HOLY CRAP

    Nice stuff Tony, thanks for the green hue in my skin this morning.


    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • RoydRage
    replied
    Toolbox

    Originally posted by Wheels
    Tony

    Pictures of toolboxes are welcome here, I know because I`ve seen pleanty


    Mike
    Mike,

    OK... You asked for it!

    Tony

    http:\\www.fanfareintl.com\SO_Box1EM2.jpg
    http:\\www.fanfareintl.com\TopChest.jpg
    http:\\www.fanfareintl.com\TopDrwRollNew.jpg
    http:\\www.fanfareintl.com\2ndDrwRoll1NEW.jpg
    http:\\www.fanfareintl.com\ScrwDwr.jpg
    http:\\www.fanfareintl.com\PlierDrwNew.jpg
    http:\\www.fanfareintl.com\Draw3.jpg
    http:\\www.fanfareintl.com\AirToolDrwNew.jpg
    http:\\www.fanfareintl.com\HammerDwr.jpg
    http:\\www.fanfareintl.com\ChstDraw4R.jpg
    http:\\www.fanfareintl.com\ChstDraw5R.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • wb5jhy
    replied
    Originally posted by burninbriar
    Personally, I think some times people put too much emphasis on perfect torch movement. The main thing is to get both sides of the weld to melt and join together to form a beed weather it can be done with a circular motion, zig zag or strait forward with no side to side. If you are moveing in a circular motion and one side is not fuzeing you may need to breifly go to trapazoidal or what ever it takes to form the bead. I think the motions are more guides than set proceedure like a sowing machine, not to say you should not try to follow them, but put more concentration on what you are creating rather than how you create it.
    That's a good point Pete. Every once in a long while I'll run what looks to me to be a near perfect bead and if someone were to ask me what kind of torch movement I used, I would honestly not remember. You just have your mind on the job at hand and do it and it turns out great.
    But I remember too when starting out you have to try many techniques to see what works. Like any skill you have to have practiced enough before it becomes intuitive. Engloid told me once about tig welding, some pick it up quick, some have to really work at it, and some never will be good at it. I'll be happy to be in the middle somewhere.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wheels
    replied
    Tony

    Pictures of toolboxes are welcome here, I know because I`ve seen pleanty


    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • RoydRage
    replied
    Beauty

    Originally posted by burninbriar
    Personally, I think some times people put too much emphasis on perfect torch movement. The main thing is to get both sides of the weld to melt and join together to form a beed weather it can be done with a circular motion, zig zag or strait forward with no side to side. If you are moveing in a circular motion and one side is not fuzeing you may need to breifly go to trapazoidal or what ever it takes to form the bead. I think the motions are more guides than set proceedure like a sowing machine, not to say you should not try to follow them, but put more concentration on what you are creating rather than how you create it.
    Pete,

    You're absolutely right!... Integrity in the weld is the bottom line... But I think all of us go "ooooh" when we see that perfect row of dimes...

    The guys welds in the Video I have... Are great technically but nothing to look it... It shouldn't matter... BUT! I am extremely ****! So... I want to strive for beautiful welds...

    You should see my Tool Box... Then you really know about me... LOL!

    Thanks, Tony

    Leave a comment:


  • burninbriar
    replied
    Personally, I think some times people put too much emphasis on perfect torch movement. The main thing is to get both sides of the weld to melt and join together to form a beed weather it can be done with a circular motion, zig zag or strait forward with no side to side. If you are moveing in a circular motion and one side is not fuzeing you may need to breifly go to trapazoidal or what ever it takes to form the bead. I think the motions are more guides than set proceedure like a sowing machine, not to say you should not try to follow them, but put more concentration on what you are creating rather than how you create it.

    Leave a comment:


  • wb5jhy
    replied
    RoydRage

    Sorry I lost track of this thread lately.
    I noticed I used a back and forth motion also on steel. Very short back step though. I think circular motion is useful for leveling out a wide bead as when caping off on a multipass on thick plate.

    Remember, the main goal is to make a sound weld (instead of just how it looks). If you're seeing the filler go to the other side then that is a good sign that you fused the base metal through the joint. What you don't want is to just melt filler rod over the seem before you establish a puddle. You can make it look great but the filler is just laying on top like hot wax on a cool surface with little depth of fusion. Use the BFH to check some coupons to see which method works best for you.

    Leave a comment:


  • acx780
    replied
    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

    Tony,

    Keep in mind that what looks good to one person might look like trash to another. It all depends on what pair of glasses you're wearing. I guess if it passes muster with x-ray glasses it must be ok...

    Leave a comment:


  • RoydRage
    replied
    Torch Movment

    Originally posted by acx780
    Tony,

    I have to apologize for not getting back to you sooner. Sometimes playtime gets interupted by what allows you to have playtime. I looked at the welds. I am by no means an "expert". The one you used a circular motion on is far and away better than the straight line weld. The idea is to get the metal to flow together and then fuse evenly. Filler rod is used to fill in gaps caused by the metal flowing together making the base metals thinner in the process. In the photo on the left, (C) you can see that the base metal has melted, it is obvious that you were able to heat both sides of the base metal evenly. You can see that the filler metal flowed into the base metal and the height of the weld metal indicates that the circle weld has more penetration as does the metal fusion at the ends of the weld. In the straight line example (s) you can see the filler metal has the appearance of being dropped on the metal. I cant see much melting of the base metal and no fusion either. So when you flipped it over what did it look like. Bet you could tell where C had been welded and maybe just a little discoloration on the backside of s.
    I think the penetration on that weld was a little better on the circular movement... I think I have a better feel for it moving in circles.. It just seems more natural to me...

    On some of my other trys with the back and forth movement with 1/8" steel butt joints... It actually looked like it was welded on BOTH SIDES! I couldn't believe it, but I guess because you are going right down the middle where the space is from the 2 pieces of metal... You go through to the other side...

    I mean this guy in the DVD does aerospace work, and that's what he uses... I just don't know if it's for me... I figure since I'm learning now, why not find the best way...

    I'd really like to know what Engold does... I respect his work a great deal...

    Another thing is, that guy that uses this techniques welds are x-ray inspected constantly, and I'm sure they are super strong, but as far as looks go they don't hold a candle, or torch LOL... To Engolds...

    Thanks, Tony

    Leave a comment:


  • acx780
    replied
    I have an excuse...

    Tony,

    I have to apologize for not getting back to you sooner. Sometimes playtime gets interupted by what allows you to have playtime. I looked at the welds. I am by no means an "expert". The one you used a circular motion on is far and away better than the straight line weld. The idea is to get the metal to flow together and then fuse evenly. Filler rod is used to fill in gaps caused by the metal flowing together making the base metals thinner in the process. In the photo on the left, (C) you can see that the base metal has melted, it is obvious that you were able to heat both sides of the base metal evenly. You can see that the filler metal flowed into the base metal and the height of the weld metal indicates that the circle weld has more penetration as does the metal fusion at the ends of the weld. In the straight line example (s) you can see the filler metal has the appearance of being dropped on the metal. I cant see much melting of the base metal and no fusion either. So when you flipped it over what did it look like. Bet you could tell where C had been welded and maybe just a little discoloration on the backside of s.

    Leave a comment:


  • RoydRage
    replied
    Torch Movement Examples

    Acx,

    You really write well, Your posts are very enthralling and descriptive!

    Here are some examples of what I did tonight... Bear in Mind... This is with a Total of 27 Minutes Arc Time.
    The weld on the left is with a constant circular motion, and the one on the right that is marked "S" is the Straight back & forth motion as outlined in the Welding DVD.

    I think I prefer the circular as it's easier to control bead width... At first I thought it wouldn't be... but if you add a little more, or less filler.. with the Straight method the bead size changes...

    It's very interesting... The Straight method requires less heat... I guess because you concentrating the arc in one area... I think I'm going to go with Circles...

    What Do You All Think??

    http://www.fanfareintl.com/weld3crp.jpg

    Thanks, Tony

    Leave a comment:


  • acx780
    replied
    Oh no, thank you !!!!!

    Tony,

    I was wondering how I move my torch because I truly dont think about it. I just watch and change things till I get what I want. I find it a balance between torch movement, filler metal feeding and amperage. It is all variable, metal thickness, outside temperature, condition of the tungstun, prep of the steel, thickness and the stage of the moon, it all matters. I let the numbers be a guide not a rule. I set my amperage about 25 or so amps above what I think I might need. I flow the argon at 15/20 cfh. Just a little while ago I headed to the shop (my wife thought something was wrong) and I watched closely while welding on 1/8" steel, butt joint, flat. I start with my pedal on the floor, establish the arc and back it off till I just maintain the puddle. My first movement is a circle and as I add filler rod I increase the amperage because the rod cools the puddle. I noticed that my movement changed to a half moon zig zag. I tend to feed the filler at a steady rate rolling it through my thumb and forefinger. I end with a slow easing off of the pedal. I push on thinner metal and always when doing out of position welds. I steady my hand by resting it on whatever for more control. I always wear gloves and cover up. I already had cancer once and just have no interest in more chemo for skin cancer. I pull on thicker metal and find I can freehand the rod a lot easier than the torch. I think the last time I really thought about technique (while welding) was when I was teaching my son to tig. That was after some very intense O/A time with him. I think he was nine or ten. Thanks for making me think and for reminding me about teaching the boy.

    Leave a comment:


  • EvanK
    replied
    Don't weld by numbers, just get a good estimate of how many amps you will need for a pice of metal and set your dial near that number and adjust it with the pedal. Get your motion down on pice of flat plate, then start doing joints, that where you will really learn something, when i was first learning to tig weld I laid down hundreds of stringer beads, I just ended up burning my hands alot, sure I got the motion down but the time would have been better spent learing how to weld different joints in different positions. And torch movement, it depends on the joint just experiment, and many folks say zigzag your filler in steel but i dab it, but it depends on the joint and which method is easier.

    Leave a comment:


  • RoydRage
    replied
    Originally posted by acx780
    Tony,

    Try both and see what you like the best. Even better learn/master both (circular-zig zag). Try the back and forth too. I cant see it but maybe there is some reason that I'm just not seeing. At the very least it will show you how narrow the width of the weld area can be. Please understand (I think you do) that just because you read it or saw it on a DVD that does'nt mean it's the absolute right or the only way to do it. I've seen more than one or two articles written by someone without a clue. That is where this message board thing comes in. Just look at the thread about cutting aluminum. Some do it one way using this or that and someone else swears by this way. They all cut aluminum and some are just better than others. It never occurred to me to cut on wood which will clean the blade, I tried it with a carbide blade. Worked like a champ. I think the most important point is that you understand what you are trying to do. That is to weld peices of metal together. Read a lot, practice more than you read and keep in mind the wings wont fall off because of your weld. Leave that to the guys who already know how to weld. Practice and learn enough, ruin a lot of metal, burn your fingers a couple of times and then you'll be one of those that know too. Engold can produce welds like those in his pictures because he has the proper equipment, conditions, material and most importantly, he has the experience and knowledge to take advantage of his tools and skill. Don't forget that by his own admission not every weld looks like those. There are plenty of pictures posted here of close to, almost, but not quite and some that are just frickin art. Keep asking questions (there are no stupid ones) and keep in mind you are in a position most would envy. You get to learn this because you want to not because you have to.
    Acx,

    Very well said... You are totally right on the money... I would really like to know what torch movement Engold uses... I think I could do a neater weld with the back & forth movement... It's strange though... They look the same... This guy moves forward, then stops and drags the torch a little back & adds filler... It creates circles and looks as if you were moving the torch in a circular direction because the puddle is round I guess, and your pushing it back, a wave ,interlocking each bead... Maybe Engold can enlighten us...

    Thanks... Tony

    Leave a comment:

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