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WHICH IS BETTER~FOR CAR REPAIRS: MIG or TIG

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  • #16
    Well everybody has their preference, and I'm a novice....
    Not to muddy up the thread, but my .02

    "Best welder for over-all car repair"

    IMHO, you need to have an acetylene wrench, and you need to have a tig welder (which typically includes a stick function).
    Use tig for thin stuff, and multi-pass for thicker, use tig for all the different alloys you might find in light vehicles. Use stick for the thicker steel on the car. Make sure to follow the machine settings and capactiy for what you need to weld.

    "Best welder for body repair" should be the title of the thread, hehe.

    I will agree that the learning curve will be much shorter on a Mig welder, and that is the right welder to start with (OA practice is not a bad idea though).

    As far as welding in stuff on the chassis, it can be done with mig, make sure your welder (and your skill) are up to the task in regards to metal thickness and fusion.

    I have no experience with body work, especially outer panels that require proper shape and finish, but I have seen alot of people use Tig to control temperature, and feed by hand; Mainly to prevent burn-through and warping.

    Mig is possible, but you can really screw up with Mig, and with a tapped machine sometimes there is never the right setting, and with a variable machine you may wish you just had an electrode, and a filler rod. Hah, if you have practice steel of the same thickness this will help you find the right settings.

    After all the car projects I've had, and alloys I've had to fabricate, I've been wishing for a tig for a long time now, alot to learn with Tig as well, I don't feel like I could weld body panels with either... but floorpans are a different story.

    Metal prep is going to be the most fun part of the project!!!!! Break out your grinders boys!

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    • #17
      TIG would be nice, but well out of the $$ range he is looking at and again a much larger learning curve.MIG is the most widely used method as it is faster and will allow for no warped parts if done correctly.
      probably the best investment for you right now would be to send Miller $25 and order the student package. it will give you a good understanding of all the welding processes and help you to decide what will suite you best. regardless of witch process you get the student pack will have valuable info for now and as a reference book for the future. you wont find a better reference for less $$ its well Worth the price.
      oh ya and if ya end up getting a miller welder you get a cool free jacket too.
      thanks for the help
      ......or..........
      hope i helped
      sigpic
      feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. [email protected]
      summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
      JAMES

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      • #18
        the O/A setup is also nice to have but mostly for taking part not putting back together.
        thanks for the help
        ......or..........
        hope i helped
        sigpic
        feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. [email protected]
        summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
        JAMES

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        • #19
          Originally posted by SCHOONER
          Gary Thanks for your imput

          What I meant about the control feeder is there a dial that controls the speed of the wire ?

          I guess from you reply IT'S THE VOLTAGE DIAL TRUE/FALSE
          I'm still learning Gary, Thanks to guys like you bringing my to school.

          GOD BLESS
          Schooner
          SCHOONER,

          Actually, the voltage dial controls the voltage! The wire speed dial controls the wire speed! Pretty straightforward.

          I recommend that you pick up a copy of "Welding Essentials" by Galvery and Marlowe. About $30 at the local bookstore. It will last you as a good reference, and will answer a lot of your questions.

          It's not the time to confuse you with tapped voltage vs. continuously variable voltage units, and wire speed tracking. We'll confuse you with that later, after you get your welder.

          Keep us up to date on your progress. We'll help any way we can.

          Hank
          ...from the Gadget Garage
          Millermatic 210 w/3035, BWE
          Handler 210 w/DP3035
          TA185TSW
          Victor O/A "J" series, SuperRange

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          • #20
            wire speed will effect the amps, the faster the wire feed the hotter it is.
            lots of units have a taped setting for volts( usually 4 options) and an adjustable wire speed nob.
            you really should look into some welding books to get you a broader ideal on the hole welding picture. again the miller student pack will cover all the processes and the pros and cons of each.
            it also contains a set of welding calculators that will be a nice quick reference later as well as help you decide what size welder will fit your needs the best.
            thanks for the help
            ......or..........
            hope i helped
            sigpic
            feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. [email protected]
            summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
            JAMES

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            • #21
              Welder for Auto Repair

              SCHOONER

              If it were me I would recommend a machine with both a variable wire speed and Voltage. The hobart 140 is not a bad machine for the money-It is better for you then one of those RED heaps in its price range. If you can save a few more bucks I would shoot for a Millermatic 135 The Drive assembly is much beefier.
              Dynasty 200DX With TEC Superflex 9 & 17 Torches,
              Hypertherm 30A Plasma
              Rincoln SP130T Mig

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              • #22
                I HAVE THE MM135 AND LOVE IT ITS A GREAT LIL MIG.
                i would recommend it to any one looking for a MIG in that size. Ive had it about 3 years i think (been a wile and I'm not good at time ) i have had no problems with it, mostly run .025 wire with C-25 gas but when i was building my steel building/shop i ran a lot of flux cored wire threw it and it burned sweet (see pic) it is a bit more $$ than the HH140 but is definitely sturdier built. and its blue it definitely gets my vote.
                Attached Files
                thanks for the help
                ......or..........
                hope i helped
                sigpic
                feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. [email protected]
                summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                JAMES

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                • #23
                  These little 120 V units cover such a small voltage range, that spending extra for a variable voltage control seems like a waste of money to me. Personally, If I were looking for a small 120 V unit to run solid wire and fluxcore, I'd just get the Hobart 140. The Lincoln SP 135 would be my next choice.The MM 135 would be last on my list.

                  BTW, unless you plan on dragging the unit around by the gun cable, the wire drive assemblies on the three above mentioned units will give you trouble free use for years.

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                  • #24
                    I had a deal I couldn't pass up on a weld pak 3200 HD, which is basically the sp135T, (tapped) and it has worked great for me for the small stuff. I have used it on exhaust tubing, and 1/8th inch steel with a little pre-heat (to bring the steel up to room temp out in the cold Michigan garage). It's had a hard life in a dirty, and cold (winters) garage in MI for the last 4-5 years, and has even survived 4 moves and some banging around without issue.

                    The mm251 is a definate step above in capability, and weld quality, but it also cost me more than 8 times as much. Don't forget the spool gun, and big gas cylinders for spray-arc, ouch!!!

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