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Pros & Cons of Leasing vs. Owning your tanks

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  • hankj
    replied
    Originally posted by MtotheIKEo
    I was just quoted ~300 bucks for a filled cylinder of CO2. The guy said it was a "50lb" size cylinder, Im thinking he was talking about the large cylinders. This was at AirGas btw. Does that price seem right? I thought it would be cheaper for some reason.
    50# is a lot of CO². If I wasn't too lazy (and hadn't had my normal cocktail hour(s) in me) I'd try to give you the arc-on time for a 50. It's huge.

    If you don't need that much, a 20# should go for around $140. There is a LOT of welding in 20# of CO²!

    I think Mike W runs a 50#. If he spots this, maybe he'll tell ya how often he needs to fill it!

    Hank

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  • calweld
    replied
    Originally posted by MtotheIKEo
    I was just quoted ~300 bucks for a filled cylinder of CO2. The guy said it was a "50lb" size cylinder, Im thinking he was talking about the large cylinders. This was at AirGas btw. Does that price seem right? I thought it would be cheaper for some reason.
    You are talking about buying the bottle?

    Checked Fresno Oxygen's website ( http://www.ramweldingsupply.com/ ) and it has a price of $282, since it is internet and being shipped I doubt it is filled. Seems airgas is in the ballpark, 50# CO2 runs about $25-$30 or so. You can double check with the Fresno Oxygen store in Stockton, they are open Saturdays too, they might have a different deal than the website.

    Leave a comment:


  • Coalsmoke
    replied
    however, if that includes buying the cylinder, then thats not bad. To buy 244 cu ft bottles here, its about $500 Cad or about $400USD

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  • Coalsmoke
    replied
    that price seems real high, unless its one of the 330cu ft bottles, then its just plain high.

    Leave a comment:


  • MtotheIKEo
    replied
    I was just quoted ~300 bucks for a filled cylinder of CO2. The guy said it was a "50lb" size cylinder, Im thinking he was talking about the large cylinders. This was at AirGas btw. Does that price seem right? I thought it would be cheaper for some reason.

    Leave a comment:


  • garybdavis
    replied
    The decision to rent verses own will largely depend on the policy of your local welding store.

    I've just switched to a different welding store as we are moving. There they won't sell you a ~200cfm bottle (they only rent them), but if you bring a "smooth ring neck" bottle in, they will put it into their rotation. When your bottle is empty, you swap it out for another one and pay a refill charge. They take care of testing all the bottles at their own expense. When I'm done dealing with them, I have a smooth ring neck bottle that is current with testing and I can go somewhere else.

    The first welding store I started with sold me my bottles and when I was readdy to move, they offered me the current going price as a refund if I wanted to return the bottles. They also took care of the testing when I was in their rotation.

    For me, this makes owning my own bottles less of a hassle and probably cheaper in the long run.

    Leave a comment:


  • Leons2003
    replied
    For the hobbyist as I am to rent would be a waste of money. I to was gifted w/my O/A for my 19 b-day in '57, I purchased "S"(~120cf) size jugs from a local Linde dealer. Down here these cylinders are an exchange basis, and in all these years I have never been dunned for a hydro. I have two dealers that provide my gases, of which I own the bottles. As was said before, depends where you live and your dealer.
    BTW, since I purchased my Spec.2050 a couple of yrs ago I use the O/A even less.
    Good luck
    L*S

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    aaaaaaaa the good old days.
    now it seems everything is about the $$$$$$.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    My OA tanks I have are a lifetime contract, that the companies do not offer anymore. I owe no retest fees, I owe nothing on them-ever- except to refill.

    The OA torches was a gift from my folks for my 16th birthday and I bought the tank contract. 22 years and never a service fee.

    Leave a comment:


  • J hall
    replied
    Well, I have 5 sets of oxy acet cylinders that are on 10 year leases.
    I tried, but could not find an real advantage to owning them.
    I prefer to let the supplier be responsible for maintaining cylinders.
    Jeff

    Leave a comment:


  • Tailshaft56
    replied
    Originally posted by TheRealSpinner
    Corning Glass is a pretty well known glass company, I currently blow glass at Chico State, CA. We hear about Corning Glass regularly. Do you do any glass blowing of your own? Around here, it seems that if your dad blows glass, you blow glass. (My dad doesn't blow glass)
    Sorry but I haven't blown any glass and my dad never mentioned it either. The plant closed around 20 years ago. What they made were Pyrex globes for coleman lanterns and I think some of the Corning ware cookware. I know at one time they were making glass beads which were meant to pumped down slow producing oil wells. Seems like there were three sizes of those beads.

    Leave a comment:


  • halbritt
    replied
    Originally posted by fun4now
    for what its werth :
    the cap required for transporting is also a law here in NY.
    I'm pretty sure that the cylinder cap law is a DOT/Federal thing, though there may also be state laws. I could verify that by looking up the specific CFR if anyone cares enough.

    My experience correlates precisely with what the gentleman that works at Praxair stated. Though the part about "existing competitor's names" might be misleading. Most places put adhesive labels on the cylinders with the company name on 'em, which is not an issue. What they won't do is fill a cylinder with a competitor's name stamped on the neck ring. I've swapped labeled cylinders with no stamp on the neck ring back and forth between Praxair and Airgas without complaint.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheRealSpinner
    replied
    Originally posted by tailshaft56
    When my dad worked at Corning Glass...
    Corning Glass is a pretty well known glass company, I currently blow glass at Chico State, CA. We hear about Corning Glass regularly. Do you do any glass blowing of your own? Around here, it seems that if your dad blows glass, you blow glass. (My dad doesn't blow glass)

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    for what its werth :
    the cap required for transporting is also a law here in NY.

    Leave a comment:


  • jwsrep
    replied
    The first thing you need to do is visit every welding distributor in the area you live. Find out what their policies are in reference to filling/exchanging cylinders. Keep in mind that welding supply companies come and go. I have been at the same distributorship for 21 years and I have seen some come and go....even big ones. Make sure that if you buy your cylinders and that paticular distributorship closes up you can be serviced by another distributor in your area. If you can't, then the money you shelled out to "buy" cylinders is gone bye-bye.
    We don't sell any cylinder above 60 cu. ft.. When it comes to a customer owned cylinder, we will fill it, but you have to sign a statement of ownership form and we record the cylinder type, size and serial number. This is a real inconvenience for the customer, paticularly when they visit our branch stores. It may take up to 2 weeks to get their cylinder back if they bring it in the day after our transfer truck is at our branch store. The transfer truck only stops once per week at each of our 3 branches. So the following week the truck would pick up the empty and return it the week after that. Now some of you may think that's bad service, but to be perfectly honest thats the best we can do. It wouldn't make sence to send a truck 35 - 45 miles to pick up 5 or 6 cylinders or even a dozen or so cylinders just to fill and then shuttle back.
    This should be some of the concerns you should have when shopping for cylinders. Again I have found by reading the posts in this thread that each area of the country is way different.

    Leave a comment:

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