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  • JBFab
    started a topic It's time . . .

    It's time . . .

    Alright I've had my syncrowave 180 SD in the garage for almost 5 years now . . . I think it's time I get serious about learning tig welding. A little background:

    I am currently a design engineer for a fab shop. I started out welding in '99 straight out of high school and became fluent in MIG and FCAW welding in a short time I then changed fab shops and ended up as an Ironworker/Millwright working across the nation building and maintaining seed plants, ethanol plants and feed mills (I became a pretty good stick welder). Since being married I came back to work at a local fab shop welding primarily structural steel. Since I have been promoted to a design engineer in our office. While I was in the first fab shop I realized that welding is somthing I really enjoy. I purchased the 180 SD and Handler 175 shortly after I discovered this. I am looking forward to purchasing a 350P to upgrade the ol' handler. Anyway, I think it's time I take a serious approach to teaching myself to tig weld. I played around with it and made some pretty nice welds on stainless, but not like those I have seen on various pressure vessels. Any tips on where to start will be greatly appreciated.

    Note: I know most of the basics about tungsten types etc. just not sure where to begin.

  • JBFab
    replied
    Fishy Jim,

    If your from Minneapolis you have probably seen a job that I worked on. The company I work for did the steel on the Hummer Dealership in Roseville.

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  • JBFab
    replied
    Originally posted by Fishy Jim

    Where in WI are ya?

    I'm in Merrill WI, about 10 minutes north of Wausau. (North Central WI)

    Sorry I'm a little slow responding. . . I had to cut firewood this weekend. No time for welding.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    I tig all kinds of hot rolled with good success. I was just saying that there have been pieces of stock that gave me **** in a hand basket, which were visually no different than other pieces of the same shape/size which I know came from the same supplier.

    I just have a feeling they're a little more lax with the chemical composition for things they know will end up as low carbon extrusions vs stuff people generally buy for load bearing and precision use.

    Leave a comment:


  • burninbriar
    replied
    I wonder if the scale gets pressed into the surface on the hot rolled. I havent really had any problems with it yet though. Knock on wood, or metal in this case.

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  • Bob Sigmon
    replied
    Ya got a point there. But I have been lucky in the past on some short welds. I usually try to mig hot rolled, it handles the scale much better.

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  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    Bob, it was hot rolled that had been flappered clean within 1.5" of the joint. Some of that stuff is just not all that kosher.

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  • Bob Sigmon
    replied
    You definately want cold rolled if you have it available. The mill scale on the hot rolled has to be ground off or you will run into nothing but trouble.

    Clean, Clean and Clean again when you start to learn tig and you'll have less problems.

    Good Luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    I've had hot rolled that just wouldn't tig for crap. Not a lot of it (and I'm still a tig newbie), but there are some steel batches that don't like the process - even with the s2 filler rod.

    The cold rolled I've done has been a dream. It's like night and day how smooth the beads flow and how nice they look when done. I also find it easier to get nice beads with stainless than I do on mild, but then you have to watch the back side of the joint as well.

    Where in WI are ya?

    Leave a comment:


  • burninbriar
    replied
    You will probably find that you need to be a lot cleaner than youre used to, it sounds like you did a lot of outdoor construction. Rust is a real killer with tig. A couple days ago I was welding some 1/16'' ms that was very rusty and I thought I had it pretty clean untill I started to weld and all **** broke loose, spitting and popping , contaminated the tungstens imediately. As I ground the metal down farther I could see very tiny pinholes of rust impregnated in the steel. Once I got past this with the grinding the welding returned to normal. I beleive this was the worst thing I have experianced with tig, especially since it was so difficult to see the problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • wb5jhy
    replied
    JB

    I have the 180SD also. Get a stick of 1/8 or 3/16 x 2" flat bar and cut up some coupons for practice. Try butts joints and fillets and log some time practicing until you get some nice uniform beads. Do some sections to evaluate the penetration your achieving.
    I find building a project will give a little more incentive to perfecting your weld procedures. It's all fun. Sometimes when I'm hiding from my teenager's rock band practice in the house, I come out to the shop and fire up the tig or mig and just melt metal for grins.

    Tom

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  • tigman250
    replied
    JB, just like anything else we need a base to start off with, the better the base the better the finished product sooooo we need some more imput from you. we need to know what areas you are struggling with before we can do a decent job giving advise. blindly slinging advise at you at this point will only confuse you. one good thing you already have a strong welding background so this should be a breeze!

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    1)Post a picture of your work, we will take it from there

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