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Tips for anodized aluminum tig?

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  • CJM
    replied
    Wow

    Laiky, Thats a great article. Thanks for the link. From the 6463 t 66 pipe to 230 amps at a balance of 8 - 9. With a off on button on the torch. Thats the trick of the trade. Hard to believe they put it all out on the table like that. I guess with their teqnical advances they ar'nt worried about competition. It took me years of doing it wrong/other ways till I got this exact advise on set up. I can tell you one thing Engloid, from what I've seen of your welding you will be showing them a thing or two for sure. Here is a project I am working on right now. I do this stuff in my spare time for a little extra income.
    Attached Files

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  • Laiky
    replied
    This sounds like the place in the current Miller Powerclick?? is it?

    http://archives.fandmmag.com/publica...pubId=1&id=67/

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  • Possum
    replied
    anodized Aluminum

    Treat anodize as you would any plated material. Weaving the torch in line with the joint,(similar to SMAW6010 on galvanize), and using a Syncrowave, increase cleaning action to about midway between maximum cleaning and balanced. Don't get too jerky with the torch, and you may have to bump up on the tungsten size. Pay attention to the arc and watch for the "sparkly" appearance as it's leading edge lifts the anodize off. Dab filler to the puddle at a slight angle from the side. Though argon can be used for tubing welds, helium and helium/argon are choice for welding tubing to thicker anchor plates. 4043 or 5356 ? Most anodized tubing used in marine fabrication is 6061, which 5356 is the recommended filler under most codes. However, a lot of marine fabricators use 4043 because it's slightly cheaper and flows better for cosmetic appearance, often creating concavity. There's also a problem with strength and marine environment/galvanic corrosion out of poorly matched metals
    I most certainly agree with getting the weld right the first time and NOT going back over the weld for the sake of cosmetics. There are serious issues with grain formation and other defects that can create safety issues with the end product.

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  • tallwelder
    replied
    Engloid, I have limited experience welding anodized aluminum and always cleaned the area to be welded first, it still welded like crap and stunk! That is why Iam posting! What if any potentially dangerous fumes and or gases are emitted from this process? Might be worth reading up on if someone knew a source. I might be off track here but would rather see You proceed with caution and stay healthy! Good Luck, and hopefully this works out good for You! Carl
    ps. Iam changing jobs as well but will start a new post later about it

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  • Firey
    replied
    some help

    I have done Ano. Alum. for around 10yrs now its cake for me now I never use pulse.I use a router with a four flute milling bit or on thin alum.I use a 41/2" grinder with a milk wheel it cleans of the Ano. nicely. Start my puddle and go.

    hope this will help you out some

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  • HAWK
    replied
    Engloid,


    Apparently the PM has been disabled. You can email me: [email protected] I'll look up my contact name and any other helpful information and pass it on to you.

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  • Engloid
    replied
    I found the previous post: http://www.millermotorsports.com/mbo...light=anodized

    For those that may get confused, beware...what some people call pulse is actually not a true machine operated pulse, but a on/off bumping of your remote contactor button (or even foot pedal).

    Leave a comment:


  • Engloid
    replied
    Originally posted by HAWK
    Engloid,

    I just make one pass with the bump method. I form a puddle, add filler, back off, start new puddle. An addition of helium helps that bump start burn through the anodizing cleanly. I also use good hart start on the machine. Are you working in Maryville? The place I'm thinking about has a good sized mixing station for Ar/He halfway down the outside of the warehouse.
    Yip..may be the same place...they make the towers for boats. How do you know the place?

    If you would, PM me with any info you have on the place...even down to who you dealt with and what your impression of them was... It may be helpful to me in the near future.

    KB: If it were just a small job for me at home, I'd clean the coating off, but this will be a high production situation. They don't want to spend the time to remove it, and neither do I, if I can keep from it.

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  • KB Fabrications
    replied
    I have done a lot of repair work on anodized aluminum. I have always either used a scotchbrite belt on a dynafile or a 3M EXL deburr wheel (9S fine) to buff off the anodizing in the weld area and then proceed like you normally would. I'm not sure if that would work for your specific job but I have had zero problems using this method.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeffscarstrucks
    replied
    There is a recent post called "I need help with anodized aliminum pipe" that covers the topic pretty well with input from Hawk and others with some variations on the subject that seem to work pretty well. Good Luck and let us know how it goes! JEFF

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  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    Sounds like you finally had enough with the last shop nickel and dime'n ya. Glad to hear you've found greener pastures.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    Engloid,

    I just make one pass with the bump method. I form a puddle, add filler, back off, start new puddle. An addition of helium helps that bump start burn through the anodizing cleanly. I also use good hart start on the machine. Are you working in Maryville? The place I'm thinking about has a good sized mixing station for Ar/He halfway down the outside of the warehouse.

    Leave a comment:


  • Engloid
    started a topic Tips for anodized aluminum tig?

    Tips for anodized aluminum tig?

    Ok, I'm starting a new job on Monday and it's ALL anodized aluminum, tig work. I've only done this stuff maybe 3 times in my years of welding...and never liked the way it welds.

    I did well enough on the test that they don't seem to think I'll have any problem picking it up...and I don't either.. however, with some good tips I may get up to par faster.

    I suck at specific amperages, so I'm not going to ask stuff like amps and speed..

    I just wanna know, what are the tricks to making it weld as much like regular old aluminum as possible? Weld it slow and cold, hot and fast, lots of filler, or what?

    This plant welds around joints to close them up, then they go back around them, bumping the button like a pulse to smooth it out. They call it "reflowing." I'm not to crazy about this idea and would rather weld it right the first time.
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