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  • Lincoln SA-200

    I found a 1967 Lincoln SA-200 for sale. I don't really want to do much mobile work, but sometimes it would come in real handy. I haven't seen it, but the owner used it pipelining everyday (I know this to be a fact). The engine got weak so he tore it down for a rebuild. In the meantime he found a little newer model for sale for a good price, so he bought it instead of fixing the older one(also fact). He just had it rewound. The engine is still took apart. He offered it to me 2 weeks ago for $600. I just got off the phone with him and he offered it up for $500. Would $300 be too much to give for this machine? How much would it cost to overhaul the engine? He said it was just missing. No slung rod or knocking. I have heard these are very good machines and can be resold easily if they are running. Give me some opinions. I just figured it might be a cheap way to have a portable machine for the few times I need it. If I decided to get rid of it or upgrade could I sell it easily and get most of my money back?
    Zeb's Welding and Machine

  • #2
    Its a great machine, if you dont buy it please give me his phone #. I rebuild these machines as a sideline. They are reliable machines! They just get worn out. You dont know what the cost will be until its all torn apart to inspect everything.

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    • #3
      They are very good machines, I would rather have something newer though, something with AC power for outages and the 200 is heavy which may not be much of an issue for you though.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Sberry
        They are very good machines, I would rather have something newer though, something with AC power for outages and the 200 is heavy which may not be much of an issue for you though.
        I think you nailed the reason there are blue boxes on every service truck
        and not SA 200's. the Bobcat handles the non welding issues better--it doesn't blow up the truck tires due to its weight, it will fit, and has AC power.
        rvannatta
        www.vannattabros.com
        Miller Bobcat 225G
        Miller Big 40 ('79 gasser)<gone>
        Miller 375 Plasma cutter<gone>
        Lincoln Vantage 400
        Lincoln Pro-Cut 80

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        • #5
          I sometimes forget the venerable SA200 when talking about arc quality. I don't usually think about it because I'm always in "service truck" mode more than I am "welding all day" mode. It's an awesome machine, and always will be for WELDING. But for a service truck, or general fabrication in the field, I don't think you can beat the Trailblazer series for weight versus performance and arc quality with 10kW AC power. Looks like you are in the market for used, though. But you have several things to consider. What do you primarily want to use it for?

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          • #6
            You know, I was thinking the same thoughts as those of the three gentlemen before me. For an occasional use welder, I think the SA200 might be more weight and size and less utility for a person's needs, unless you plan on welding pipe occasionally, then it all slightly drifts towards that SA200 FWIW, I tried an old SA200 once and was not impressed with it. I'm not sure what was wrong with it (if anything) but it had very little arc force at all, which made for smooth but runny beads. I'd hate to have to do any decent amount of vertical up with that machine I tried. It also had aluminum windings, if that had anything to do with it.
            hre

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            • #7
              A Trailblazer would definitely suit my needs better, but I can't tie up that much money in one right now. I was hoping maybe I could get this one running, put some pretty paint on it, and maybe later turn a little profit on it and get something really nice.


              I do know this machine has copper windings.
              Zeb's Welding and Machine

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              • #8
                If it were me, I'd probably factor as much as $1500 for a complete rebuild, but as shieldarc says, it costs what it costs. One thing for sure, there are always little extras that pop up. It comes down to 3 things, are you ok with it being a project and 2, is your budget flexible, and 3, are you easily going to be able to pack this thing around? If yes to the above, then go for it.
                hre

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                • #9
                  Well, I went and looked at it this evening. I think I'm gonna pass on this one. It has been sitting outside with the head off. He had it covered up with a trash bag. The cylinders were badly rusted. I'm sure it would have to be bored, new valves, no telling what else. I wish he would have just left the engine together. I could have put in some rings and faced the valves and seats and had a running machine.
                  Zeb's Welding and Machine

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Protraxrptr17
                    Well, I went and looked at it this evening. I think I'm gonna pass on this one. It has been sitting outside with the head off. He had it covered up with a trash bag. The cylinders were badly rusted. I'm sure it would have to be bored, new valves, no telling what else. I wish he would have just left the engine together. I could have put in some rings and faced the valves and seats and had a running machine.
                    Ya know, you can rebuild that motor for the cost of a pc board...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Protraxrptr17
                      Well, I went and looked at it this evening. I think I'm gonna pass on this one. It has been sitting outside with the head off. He had it covered up with a trash bag. The cylinders were badly rusted. I'm sure it would have to be bored, new valves, no telling what else. I wish he would have just left the engine together. I could have put in some rings and faced the valves and seats and had a running machine.
                      Shame on them for leaving the head off! If you are looking for a project it might still be plausable. Those old Continentals were designed in the 1920's are one of the most rebuildable of all engines. They are truly a top notch industrial engine. Manuals are cheap, parts are too. Anyone with the mechanical skills to overhaul a 5 horse Briggs & Stratton is good to go on building a rock solid Continental that will run for 10,000 hours easy. Just a thought to keep in mind.

                      JTMcC.
                      Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

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                      • #12
                        Surely it couldn't be rebuilt for less than $500 could it?
                        Zeb's Welding and Machine

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Protraxrptr17
                          Surely it couldn't be rebuilt for less than $500 could it?

                          I quite agree the continentals run a long time. I doubt if our 25 year old Big 40 has ever had anything done to the engine, but then there comes a time when other stuff begins to be bothersome. The wiring harness gets brittle, the idle down quits working, the muffler corrodes off, etc. any of which can be repaired without a lot of effort, but.

                          Sort of like cars and trucks.--- a good many of them are driven to the junk yard.

                          Got the welder to fix busted things, and if it is busted too, then it becomes one more busted thing, and I got too many busted things already.
                          rvannatta
                          www.vannattabros.com
                          Miller Bobcat 225G
                          Miller Big 40 ('79 gasser)<gone>
                          Miller 375 Plasma cutter<gone>
                          Lincoln Vantage 400
                          Lincoln Pro-Cut 80

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Rvannatta

                            Sort of like cars and trucks.--- a good many of them are driven to the junk yard.

                            Not SA200's. They are like early Mustangs, people seek them out and keep them around even if only for a parts machine. very very few go to the scrapyard, and then only by people who don't know what they have.


                            JTMcC.
                            Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ShieldArc
                              Its a great machine, if you dont buy it please give me his phone #. I rebuild these machines as a sideline. They are reliable machines! They just get worn out. You dont know what the cost will be until its all torn apart to inspect everything.
                              You still interested? This guy is a friend of mine. I just don't have the time or desire to get that deep in a project right now.
                              Zeb's Welding and Machine

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