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How long should a tank of argon last?

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  • tomasharvey
    replied
    As said, the older SD180 does not have an adjustable post flow. I prefer the ball type flow meters due to being able to check the flow easier. The color of the ball is normaly red but it is the scale your worried about. Make sure the meter is set up for Argon or Tri-mix or whatever your running...normally each one has a few scales for 2-3 different gases on the same meter.

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    lowlypawn

    all single stage regulators will need reajusting as the botle presher changes. the flow meaters you showed for $60 is preferd by most TIG welders because it is easyer to see and read from a distance, alowing for checking flow at a glance, as it will change as the botle emptys if welding all day you may need to ajust during a job. a dule stage will maintain the same flow from start to finish but you will not like the $$$$$$$$$$$

    as for tapping the pedle for pre-flow you are again waisting gas as your synco will have a built in pre-flow, so you are starting the pre-flow then the post-flow, then the pre-flow all befor starting your arc and if you do lots of lil welds you are useing more gas than arc time for shoure. so to say you could get 3Hrs from a tank will all depend on how and what you weld, lots of lil tacks will use lots of gas just for pre and post flows. i would stop the pre arc tap as im almost positive your synco has a preset pre-flow its just not ajustable like the post flow because the post flow can be changed to acomidate the type of weld and matereal, where as the pre-flow is just about clearing the air to protect the work and tung. and start the arc. without a preflow you could not start an arc as it needs the gas to strike properly. well you could start it but it would not be prity

    the short version is your gage is most likely fine, you are just in shock over how much gass is used in TIG compared to MIG. your owners manual should tell you how to test the gage and hoses for a leak if you feel that is the problem, but the setting changing is not an indication of a bad gage.TIG just use'es a lot of gas witch is also part of the reason the $$$ for TIG work is higher.

    happy sparks to ya

    Leave a comment:


  • precisionworks
    replied
    TIG work seems to use about twice as much shield gas as MIG, per foot of welding. It's a part of the process:

    the preflow is needed to purge the area before arc-start,

    post flow is needed to protect the weldment AND to protect the tungsten as it cools. The minimum post flow is that the gas should continue as long as the tungsten has color (red or orange).

    Even the large 330 CF tanks go pretty quickly.

    Leave a comment:


  • lowlypawn
    replied
    Originally posted by RadMan
    Lowlypawn, does your regulator look like this?

    Yep, that's it.

    Leave a comment:


  • ShieldArc
    replied
    You should be able to get this Victor flowmeter for 47 dollars.
    #VIC0781-2723
    Try ramweldingupply.com

    Leave a comment:


  • RadMan
    replied
    Originally posted by lowlypawn
    Yes I do know what post flow is and I think mine is set for around 5 or 10 seconds, I haven’t timed but it seems at most maybe 3 to 5 seconds longer then needed.

    For pre-flow I just tap the pedal, wait a second then start welding, that’s the correct way right?

    Is the post flow adjustable? This is the model I have. It’s an older model.
    http://www.millermotorsports.com/pro...wave180sd.html


    Also no one has told me if a ball flow meter would be more accurate then my current gauge setup.
    Lowlypawn, does your regulator look like this?


    If so i think I think I know what's happening, for some reason as the bottle looses pressure the flow regulator increases flow.

    You just have to be on top of flow adjustments with this setup constainly reducing flow as the bottle depletes.

    I belive the floating ball regulator is better, it sure costs more.

    Leave a comment:


  • frank865
    replied
    Originally posted by lowlypawn
    Also no one has told me if a ball flow meter would be more accurate then my current gauge setup.
    Both are fairly accurate... The "floating ball" may have a small edge, but any single stage regulator will change the flow rate as the pressure in the tank changes, nothing wrong, it's just the nature of the beast. You'll have to "tweak" it once in a while, & after each tank change.
    If you don't trust your regulator, your peace of mind may be worth the $61 flow guage, it'll take a long time, if ever, to get a payback in gas savings! (Unless, of course, your regulator IS bad ! )

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    That sounds like what a plugged up collet body will do. You sure it was lack of post flow and not restricted flow in general? My tigmate has 10 seconds regardless of current or arc duration. I got some of that burnt tungsten when I had spattered some zinc up in the cup and plugged the gas lens.

    Leave a comment:


  • Compchassis
    replied
    When welding with my old 180 SD which did not have adjustable post flow, I would many times build up a black scale on the tungsten and then start getting erratic welds. After getting my bigger 351 with adjustable pre and post flow I read the manual and it suggests a post flow of 1 second per 10 amps of welding current.

    I agree that this may be on the extreme high side, but, I try to stay around the suggestion to slightly under it and I no longer have the scale buildup on the tungsten.

    Leave a comment:


  • MMW
    replied
    I don't think one is any more accurate than the other. For small short welds set post flow to minimum.---MMW---

    Leave a comment:


  • df5152
    replied
    I started with a 60cf that i used with my mig welder(which lasts a long time on there) when i got my tig machine I used the 60cf tank on there for a short time and was going through gas like crazy. its the pre and post flow that really eats it up, then I jumped to a big tank...keep the little for backup and portability..

    Leave a comment:


  • lowlypawn
    replied
    Yes I do know what post flow is and I think mine is set for around 5 or 10 seconds, I haven’t timed but it seems at most maybe 3 to 5 seconds longer then needed.

    For pre-flow I just tap the pedal, wait a second then start welding, that’s the correct way right?

    Is the post flow adjustable? This is the model I have. It’s an older model.
    http://www.millermotorsports.com/pro...wave180sd.html


    Also no one has told me if a ball flow meter would be more accurate then my current gauge setup.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bulldog
    replied
    Pawn,
    Do you know what your pre flow and post flow is set for.I've seen guys use 20 sec of post flow and not even know they have post flow.
    Bulldog

    Leave a comment:


  • frank865
    replied
    Originally posted by lowlypawn
    Ok I think I have a 125 cubic feet cylinder (it’s 43 inches tall). So at 15 CF/H I should be able to weld for 8 hours but I bet got less then ¼ of that on this last cylinder. I did notice my regulator got turned way up to 25 somehow so that probably cost me a lot gas.

    Would this save me enough gas to warrant the 60 bucks?

    http://www.welding-direct.com/sinstagflowr.html

    Right now I have the dual gauge setup and it seem very inaccurate.
    As others have said before TIG is expensive! if you wanna play, you've got to pay. If you're using a 125 cf tank, & your regulator was set at 25 cfh, that's only 5 hours (not counting the pre & post flow!) sounds like you're just about where you're supposed to be.

    Leave a comment:


  • lowlypawn
    replied
    Ok I think I have a 125 cubic feet cylinder (it’s 43 inches tall). So at 15 CF/H I should be able to weld for 8 hours but I bet got less then ¼ of that on this last cylinder. I did notice my regulator got turned way up to 25 somehow so that probably cost me a lot gas.

    Would this save me enough gas to warrant the 60 bucks?

    http://www.welding-direct.com/sinstagflowr.html

    Right now I have the dual gauge setup and it seem very inaccurate.

    Leave a comment:

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