Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What happened here?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • HAWK
    replied
    Wiping with a clean dry cloth works though the directions recommend a water rinse before drying. I try to at least dip in a water bucket and then dry. It makes it easier to dry-less friction between the cloth and the base metal. At any rate it really cleans.

    As for the ? on ingredients-nothing listed.

    Leave a comment:


  • frank865
    replied
    Originally posted by HAWK
    I pour some into a plastic medicine cup and dip a SS toothbrush in it and then gently brush it across the aluminum. Usually a minute or less of sitting on the base metal will do a fine job. If it is some really nasty material, I brush mildly and let it sit.

    Always wear eye protection, long sleeves, and gloves. It will splatter-bad news on bare skin and eyes.
    After you let it set for the minute or so...do you wash it off? Wipe it off? Or what (I've not bought any yet, directions may be on the bottle! Sorry for the DA question, just curious )

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    I pour some into a plastic medicine cup and dip a SS toothbrush in it and then gently brush it across the aluminum. Usually a minute or less of sitting on the base metal will do a fine job. If it is some really nasty material, I brush mildly and let it sit.

    Always wear eye protection, long sleeves, and gloves. It will splatter-bad news on bare skin and eyes.

    Leave a comment:


  • racing_dave
    replied
    Hawk,

    How do you apply the protex chemical? do you just brush it on and let it sit for a minute? or, should i scrub it into the aluminum with a stainless brush?

    thanks
    dave.

    Leave a comment:


  • tigman250
    replied
    Originally posted by Jim2
    Jeff, More pictures! It's interesting to see your progress.
    i agree, keep em coming!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim2
    replied
    I think I recall you said you were using 3/32 tung. I'd say about 7-9 sec.

    Do a test bead of about an inch at your avg current then stop the weld and watch your tungsten. If your post flow is too short you will see brown/purple/black on your tungsten from it reacting with air while the tung was still hot. Similarly, don't move your torch away too fast when you finish your weld as the quick movement will allow air to contaminate the tung, giving the same result as a short post flow.

    BTW, you want your tung to appear somewhat flat grey color up to the ball which should appear chrome like.

    Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • 2JZfan
    replied
    what kind of postflow time should I shoot for with ~ 130A on AC?

    as far as the torch angle, being the beginner that I am, I'm mainly practiced in one position: welding a bead coming straight towards me with the torch leaning slightly away from me and the filler rod coming in between me and the torch. But, in the case of trying to write "help!" somewhat quickly I was doing the welds at different angles than I normally do and it wouldn't surprise me if I was doing some odd angles. As I type this, I'm realizing that this is probably an odd angle to have focused on, but 99% of what I've welded so far is exhaust and intake tubing, held in a vice, and that seems to be the most comfortable way for me to approach that type of weld. Oh well, I'm sure with another couple hundred hours of practicing it will all fall into place

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim2
    replied
    Jeff, black at the beginning of a bead indicates to me that heat should be applied more gradual, eventually heating the puddle area hotter than before, prior to advancing. Also, advance slower when welding thereby injecting more heat which will allow the contaminants to flow and flush to the bottom of the weld puddle. This will also smooth out the rope effect and should give you a clean bead which will polish up well.

    I see an offset oblong etch area at the beginning of each weld. I'm wondering if your holding your torch at a severe angle to your work. Keep your torch (line of tungsten) canted no more than about 15 to 20 degrees from virtical pointed towards your weld direction.

    Use as large a cup as will fit in your work area. A #5 cup is small for general aluminum, I find they can allow a air to infuse when the rod is dipped. 7-8 is better, lens or no lens.

    More pictures! It's interesting to see your progress.

    Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • Engloid
    replied
    If you have postflow, maybe it's not turned up high enough to shield the tungsten as it cools....so it contaminates and then puts that into your next bead.

    Leave a comment:


  • rb455ho
    replied
    No problem, viewing. I believe some diluted phosphoric acid will do the same. Check the ingredients Hawk and let us know.

    Leave a comment:


  • tigman250
    replied
    you mentioned cup size earlier, i prety much use a #7 across the board, i stock them all but 90% of the time i have a #7 on, that way you can kind of use the cup to hold your distance right (on a fillet weld of course)......oh yeah practice helps a ton!

    Leave a comment:


  • RadMan
    replied
    I have inadvertently applied filler rod to my tungsten, there is no mistaking what happened, my electrode is now pregnant!


    I rely on sound as much as sight when welding, I pretty much know when my electrode is too close to the puddle. I'm not sure if contamination can occur without flash and pop, but I suspect it could.
    My tungstens spend almost as much time on the grinder as they do in the torch.

    Leave a comment:


  • 2JZfan
    replied
    I'm sure you guys are right, since we started these talks I've been regrinding the tungsten often just to make sure I remove anything that it picks up. I can't really "see" anything on the tip, but it's odd because right after I grind it, the first bead will always go real smoothly, then things start getting a little "iffy" on subsequent beads. This would be explained be tungsten contamination for sure. I've had times where the tungsten definitely touched the pool and there was a flash or pop before the arc continued on. But is it possible to get the tungsten close enough where material transfers to it without there being such a noticeable (visible) flash?

    Jeff

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    2JZfan,

    I tend to agree with Radman that somewhere along the way your tungsten is getting contaminated. Dipping the puddle is typical when learning. Sometimes you do it without realizing it happened. Attached is a "Snag it" JPG file from my earlier PDF. Can you open it?
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • RadMan
    replied
    Yes it sticks out that much and more, but only with a lens, I modified a turkey deep fry basket for a caterer last month, I had the electrode out a good inch to make a weld 'inside' the basket, it worked well.

    I still think you touched the pool with the electrode on that second bead, that will cause an explosion of sorts, and make a mess.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X