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Soldering tinyparts ??

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  • #16
    I use a Haco for standard use and a Den-on for hole blowing and sucking solder, it's a one stop gun with a built-in vacumn, plus you can get the SMD tips for it.

    Bigger stuff like comutators, mig guns and plasma torches I use Low temp silver solder, ltrade name "Staybrite", cats ***.

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    • #17
      I use an ancient 25 watt weller for small stuff, I sharpen the tip to a fine point(kinda like a tungsten electrode).


      Btw Cruizer, do you still have a used coolmate for sale?

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      • #18
        Look at the Metcal brand - we've been using these for the last several years at work (we used to use Weller, but not anymore).

        http://www.okinternational.com/soldering

        They have a large selection of tips, and they are super easy to change between sizes.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Greg60143
          Look at the Metcal brand - we've been using these for the last several years at work (we used to use Weller, but not anymore).

          http://www.okinternational.com/soldering

          They have a large selection of tips, and they are super easy to change between sizes.
          Those look nice.How much are they like the SP200?

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          • #20
            I'm no too sure on the prices. You should use their links to find the rep in your area. If you have alot to rework, they have tips designed to remove surface mount components in one shot - it beats the **** out of using a regular iron and solder wick (especially if you're not VERY careful - you can lift the traces right off of the PCB).

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            • #21
              Hi guys.

              I do small circuit work for a living and continiously have to solder very small components such as 0402 resistors and such.

              A 0402 component is 1mm x 0.5mm. Very small.

              My choice is a Metcal SP200 unit. They can be purchased from Digikey.com (or.ca if you are from Canada)

              A bit pricier than other brands but well worth it you will continue to solder.

              If you have any additional questions let me know.

              SP200 = about $330 in Canadian funds.

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              • #22
                My EE friend has a Metcal unit and it is definitely the bee's knees. For myself, I have a cheaper Weller temp control station. I solder larger surface-mount stuff with it, but I can't really do rework. I've also got a vacuum desoldering station, but I hate rework, so I never use it.

                If you've never soldered before, doing rework on surface mount components isn't the place to start.
                - Heath

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                • #23
                  Thanks
                  But,I've done very little soldering.They have plenty of old units to practice on.
                  Any pointers appreciated type of solder,size of solder etc..And comparing the Metcal to the Weller units.
                  The Weller's have a tempture controll wouldn't that be better that a set tempeture.Ive been looking on the auction site.
                  Thanks
                  DEA

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by DEA
                    Thanks
                    But,I've done very little soldering.They have plenty of old units to practice on.
                    Any pointers appreciated type of solder,size of solder etc..And comparing the Metcal to the Weller units.
                    The Weller's have a tempture controll wouldn't that be better that a set tempeture.Ive been looking on the auction site.
                    Thanks
                    DEA
                    In general.

                    I find that the Metcal stations are better because the iron is easier to manipulate (better more flexible wire) and more importantly, the very tip of the soldering iron stays hot. This is really important for small intricate work.

                    If this is something that you will be doing that will make you money, I would strongly reccomend the Metcal. I know that it costs a bit more money up front but is well worth the investment.

                    That being said, the Metcal is not the best of the best, there are other stations out there that are better but cost in the $1200+ range. Would I like one of those? Yes. Can I justify the cost? No - and I do this work for a living I am also an EE.

                    In general when soldering, heat the pad and dap on a small amount of solder, you should see a nice flow around the joint, not gobby just a nice flow. For smaller placement I prefer to use a microscope when soldering (0402, 0201 parts). These can be done by the naked eye but it is a real pain in the butt. It should seem quite obvious (especially with a microscope) when the solder joint is good. The biggest problem that you will have with hand soldering is the application of too much solder and resultant solder bridges.

                    What exactly will you be soldering? Let me know and I can give you some pointers. Generally it is quite simple but there are different techniques required for various components.

                    Cheers,

                    Steve

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                    • #25
                      About the temperature setting.

                      The metcal's temerature is set by the tips themselves. I like to solder at 350C. I use that setting for everything, when the part gets bigger and requires more heat I use a bigger tip.

                      Too hot will cause the traces to lift off of the PCB, too little heat will cause cold solder joints.

                      The type of solder that I use is the thinnest that I can purchase (I do not have it in front of me as we are in the process of unpacking from a move) and use no-clean flux type solder for electronics.

                      Even though you use a no-clean flux MAKE SURE that you clean the boards with a high quality flux remover when you are done. Left over flux can do some very strange things to circuits over time. (corrosion, shorts etc). Purchase a small (tooth brush sized) hog-hair brush, spray the PCB with the cleaner and gently scrub the joints with the brush, rinse with a small amount of flux remover and let dry. The end result should be a nice clean board with shiney solder joints.

                      Cheers,

                      Steve

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                      • #26
                        [QUOTE=Steved]About the temperature setting.

                        The metcal's temerature is set by the tips themselves. I like to solder at 350C. I use that setting for everything, when the part gets bigger and requires more heat I use a bigger tip.

                        Too hot will cause the traces to lift off of the PCB, too little heat will cause cold solder joints.

                        The type of solder that I use is the thinnest that I can purchase (I do not have it in front of me as we are in the process of unpacking from a move) and use no-clean flux type solder for electronics.

                        Even though you use a no-clean flux MAKE SURE that you clean the boards with a high quality flux remover when you are done. Left over flux can do some very strange things to circuits over time. (corrosion, shorts etc). Purchase a small (tooth brush sized) hog-hair brush, spray the PCB with the cleaner and gently scrub the joints with the brush, rinse with a small amount of flux remover and let dry. The end result should be a nice clean board with shiney solder joints.

                        Cheers,

                        Steve[/QUOTE
                        Steve thanks
                        I will be replacing the microphone and reciever in hearing aids.
                        Is the Metcal sp 200 a vearable heat system or do I need one what are some good electronic suppliers for solder,magnifying lens etc.
                        also what is the name of the tip you were talking about.
                        Steve
                        Thanks again

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                        • #27
                          No problem, any time for the help.

                          The metcal does do variable heat indirectly as you have to replace the tips to vary the temperature.

                          That being said I work at my office with a Metcal and have never changed the temperature settings by changing the tips.

                          I have also worked at other clients offices and used their equipment, ones that you could vary the tip temperature, and I have never had the requirement to change the tip temperature.

                          As for the tips. I can recommend tips but I need to know what you will be soldering. If you could take a picture (with scale of course) or send me some of the part numbers of the components that you will be soldering, I will gladly suggest the appropriate tips for you.

                          To sum it up: No you will not need a temperature controlled soldering station. There are applications for it but nothing that you will need it for. You will be very happy with the Metcal, I used to use a Weller and finally had enough and purchased a SP200. If it broke tomorrow I would purchase another one without hesitation.

                          As for the magnification - this corresponds to the components that you will be soldering and how good your eyes are.

                          I can and do solder 0402 components unaided. This is not a lot of fun and not something that I can do for extended periods of time. If I have to solder for extended periods of time I use a very good microscope.

                          If you are soldering 0603 components and larger, a microscope is not required at all. (It is nice though) It helps if you have one of those lighted loops that you can purchase at Staples and places like that.

                          It all depends on how many of these you will be doing and how much you are getting paid. The reason that I say that is my microscope is referbished and I got it for a REALLY good deal - it was still $1500. If you go that route you will want something with a long focal length so you still have room to work under.

                          Best idea right now? Let me know the size of components and I can steer you in the right direction.

                          Cheers,

                          Steve

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                          • #28
                            Steved
                            Here is a link to the microphones and recievers
                            I can e mail you a picture of a open unit
                            Thanks
                            Doug
                            [email protected]
                            http://www.knowleselectronics.com/pr...?CATEGORY_ID=2

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