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  • help me decide syncrowave/dynasty

    here is the scoop my father and i are planning to open a fab shop this spring and i need my very own Tig machine. i have used a Lincon squarewave (what i learned on) and several Syncrowave 250's (through previous employers) i have never used a dynasty though. the application is general fabrication it has to be an all arround machine so the maxstar is out due to it's DC only limitations. it's time will be spent approx. 50-50 steel-alum, space taken up by a large machine is not an issue nor is portability or power availability. the only thing etched in stone is i have decided absolutly on a blue one please state the pros and cons of each machine, all comments are welcome, although i prefer to hear from people that have used both machines (sync/dynasty) as i can look up the specs myself, is the dynasty really worth the extra dough?

    ps anyone in MI have a dynasty i can strike an arc with?
    The one that dies with the most tools wins

    If it's worth having, it's worth working for

  • #2
    The Dynasty would give more control on ac since you can vary the frequency and would be better for portability ( lighter and auto-link input.). If you need more amps the Synch would be the way to go.

    By the way there may be a couple of used machines on E-bay in your neck of the woods.

    Dennis
    Dennis


    Thermal Arc 185-TSW
    Millermatic Challenger 172
    VictorO/A
    Atlas Craftsman 12 by 24 Lathe
    Esab PCM-875
    Wholesale Tool Mill-Drill

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    • #3
      I have a dynasty 200 and I'm am impressed everytime I use the machine. Last weekend I got to play with a dynasty 300, also a great machine. The dynasty series are great machines giving any shop alot of fabrication flexiabilty. I hope to add a Dynasty 300 to my blue list this up coming year. Good luck on your decision.

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      • #4
        I use the Syncrowave 250 at work, and a Dynasty 200 at home. I really don't like the Syncrowave, but unless you have the money for a Dynasty 300. I would get the Syncrowave 250 for work, it has much higher amps and a much higher duty cycle.
        22 years welding experience
        CWB Certificate
        SMAW-all position Steel Alloy
        GTAW-all position Stainless Steel
        Welder Red Seal Endorsement -Canadian Interprovincial
        Pressure Welding Certification

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        • #5
          Dennis summed it up pretty well.

          Inverter is smaller, lighter, easy to take in the field, & gives you greater arc-shaping ability.

          The transformer has a pile-driving a**.

          Many people learned to TIG on a transformer & that's what they prefer. My local Miller welding supply hardly ever sells a Dynasty. Then again, they hardly ever sell a Suitcase feeder with an engine-drive

          Inverters dominate in Europe, and many are made there (Lincoln inverters are made in Italy, in their own factory). You mention 50% steel, 50% aluminum. If the aluminum includes gauge thickness work, especially out-of-position, you'll probably prefer the Dynasty. It's much easier to tune the arc cone on thinner, akward weldments (vertical inside corners, for example).
          Barry Milton
          ____________________

          HTP Invertig 201
          HTP MIG2400

          Miller Trailblazer 302, Spoolmatic 30A, Suitcase 12RC
          Clarke Hotshot

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          • #6
            I’m no expert but I asked the same question to the welders at my work when I was looking for a welder, Both have been welding for over 20 years, one guy (Dave) even worked on a refinery for many years. I have looked at his welds and they are so perfect it looks like a machine created them.

            Anyway both of em told me that all those bells and whistles have a very minimal effect. Skill is 95% of it and all that other stuff is minor. I’m not saying you don’t need a good machine and a harbor freight will weld as good as a Miller or Lincoln. But they have a nice miller in the shop with that wave form control and they say they NEVER use it.

            What started the question was when I found a good deal on my SW180, it was an older model without the wave form control and I asked if I should hold out and get the newer model with more features. Both said **** no, you don’t need em and wont miss em. So far they have been right but then again I’m just welding simple stuff like making a weight bench and practicing on aluminum.

            I don’t know what you will be making but if I was planning on spending around 3k on a welder I would get a multi process welder so I could do TIG and MIG. For production work a mig might suit your needs better.

            But between the syncrowave/dynasty It depends on what model.

            SW250 DX is $2842 (from miller site) and Dynasty 200 is $2955. I would get the Dynasty just because it’s much smaller and lighter. But the Dynasty300 is around 500 more then the SW 350DX so I would probably get the SW350.

            The only other thing to consider is reliability and is inverter technology as reliable as transformer welders? I have no idea but transformer welders have been around forever so it’s tried and true (and heavy) technology.

            My thought are basically this. They all do the same thing, they melt metal right? Who cares what the waveform looks like. I have seen Dave make perfect (I mean perfect) looking welds on older miller machines so this new wave shaping technology to me seems like cruse control on a car, not really needed and wont make you a better driver.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by lowlypawn
              I don’t know what you will be making but if I was planning on spending around 3k on a welder I would get a multi process welder so I could do TIG and MIG. For production work a mig might suit your needs better.
              we already have 3 mig machines just need the tig to round out the arsenal.
              The one that dies with the most tools wins

              If it's worth having, it's worth working for

              Comment


              • #8
                The best TIG fabricators I've ever met work eight hours every day on the same parts (SS for boat handrails, bowrails, radar arches, etc.). After welding, the parts go to prepolish, final polish, and shipping. As near perfect as any human-driven weld can be. Certainly the upper ten percent of welders I know.

                The inverter has an advantage for the other 90%. If you don't weld eight hours a day, but you also run MIG, stick, O/A, etc., arc-shaping is an advantage.

                Inverters don't make you a better welder. They do make it easier to achieve better weldments.
                Barry Milton
                ____________________

                HTP Invertig 201
                HTP MIG2400

                Miller Trailblazer 302, Spoolmatic 30A, Suitcase 12RC
                Clarke Hotshot

                Comment


                • #9
                  Do you want to have a smaller cleaning zone on your alumimun welds?
                  The Syncro can never match that Dynasty in that area.
                  It also will have much more adjustment in the area of pulse.
                  It's just flat out faster with more range. I happen to not like having
                  the hi-freq running around my CNC cutting machine.
                  Another area the Dynasty kicks butt. It will run on three phase
                  power too. The inverters arc are just more powerful on ac,
                  then a Rec.trans machine. You can get more heat into the weld
                  at the same amps output.

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                  • #10
                    I like all the feautures that the inverter machines offer, but, something just scares me about pulling 200-400 amps through microchips, diodes and transistors. There are 30-40 year old transformer based tig welders still being used every day out there, but who knows what the service life of the inverter machines is going to be or how long parts are going to be made to keep them running.

                    I might also suggest you look around on the used market for a good machine. I recently picked up a synrco 351 with very low usage and it is a great machine. Plenty of welders sitting around out there in the corner of shops not being used.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Compchassis
                      I like all the feautures that the inverter machines offer, but, something just scares me about pulling 200-400 amps through microchips, diodes and transistors. There are 30-40 year old transformer based tig welders still being used every day out there, but who knows what the service life of the inverter machines is going to be or how long parts are going to be made to keep them running.

                      I might also suggest you look around on the used market for a good machine. I recently picked up a synrco 351 with very low usage and it is a great machine. Plenty of welders sitting around out there in the corner of shops not being used.
                      I'm just curious,do you mind saying how old the 351 was and what you had to give for it ??I have a 2000 miller Syncrowave 350LX with a V-3 cooler that I purchased new in late December of 2000 and I have been toying with selling it,but it is very near new with all the bells and whistles and well under 50 hours on it since new,so I dont want to give it away,either,because I have a ton of money in to it.I would like to try a dynasty 300,but not if I have to give away my Syncrowave.I cant remember how to check the internal hour meter,does anyone out there know how? It was quite simple,I just cant remember how to do it.

                      tooldude56

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tooldude56
                        I have a 2000 miller Syncrowave 350LX with a V-3 cooler that I purchased new in late December of 2000 and I have been toying with selling it
                        tooldude56 if you decide to sell, come up with a price and shoot me a e-mail at tigman250atyahoo.com

                        i think i will go with the transformer machine it's tried and true and a better duty cycle. not that the inverter machines aren't good but i think i will be happier with a sync.

                        thanks to all!
                        The one that dies with the most tools wins

                        If it's worth having, it's worth working for

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                        • #13
                          I paid $2800 for my 351 and it was originally purchased new in may 97. It had been sitting idle since 2000 and came complete with a water cooler torch etc. It's 400 amp capability was way more than I needed, but I figued I was getting it for almost a grand less than a new tig runner package and if I ever do need 400 amps it is there.

                          Also, if there is some kind of internal hour meter I would be interested in knowing how to get to it myself.

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                          • #14
                            No bad choice here. Learned on a sinusoidal wave ~output machine.

                            Tigman 250,

                            I spent much time mastering the 60HZ sine wave outputfrom a Lincoln Ideal Arc. I learned to make great welds with the beast. It is still in operation though only in memory for me.

                            Later I became familiar with the squarewave arc output of the Syncrowave. It made things easier. I believe the best operators got better and the average guys picked up a notch too.

                            The advanced squarewave arc of the Dynasty inverter requires no HF, except for arc initiation, and has almost unlimited AC wave shaping with phenomenal results in the hands of a skilled/machine familiar operator. For applications within its duty cycle and amperage range it simpy cannot be beat for AC or DC GTAW. I've done everything from .004" hastealloy ribbon to 1" aluminum webbing.

                            Looking at the big picture through your eyes I would have to vote for the Syncrowave 350 series. Space and power don't seem to be an issue. The Syncrowave 350 has a superior duty cycle rating and time tested technology under its wrapper.

                            Just for grins I hope you have an opportunity to work with a D300DX and a skilled operator that can make it walk the walk. You will be amazed and may want to add a high tech Dynasty 300DX or even a newer VP 350 version to your arsenal on down the highway.

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                            • #15
                              I agree with HAWK, I've welded with both and either will get the job done. prefer the inverters. The added features will make an amature look pretty good, and an experienced welder just amazing! I would recomend a test drive on the Dynasty 300DX unbelievable! I'll let you come to southern Indiana and run my 200DX anytime!

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