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Excavator pin boss replace

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  • Protraxrptr17
    replied
    Thanks again for all the good words. I put .008" clearance in there. I didn't worry about distortion too much. This thing was so thick. I woudl weld one pass and switch to the other side. Usually the phone would ring or somebody would come in so I would stop for a minute. I also had to start the machine and boom in or out to reach the top and bottom.

    Stickrod, I just left it like it was. The pictures did make it look like it could have used more, but up close I just really didn't see the need. It was beveled down to 1/8" all the way around. Thanks for your good words, customers like these are the best. I am free to do a good job because I don't have to worry about getting in a hurry or skimping on material.

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  • Coalsmoke
    replied
    Thanks Dan, sounds good and I'd like to see your shop. I have a couple (probably 3) of days of work left on the deck, and then hopefully I'll be killing time waiting for paint to dry. Ended up cutting out another chunk of the body yesterday, found a 4" x 10" spot hiding that was rusted down to about the thickness of a business card

    For the pins, if needed I could track down what the new specs are, they might be a bit tighter new from the factory, but for worn equipment, those are the median tolerances.

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  • dandimand
    replied
    good info to keep in mind for the future i know the clearances we run are quite a bit tighter around .003" so that may be why we have to run a ream after welding . stephan if you get a chance come on by new shop should be up and running shortly .so much work to do but finally seeing light at end of tunnel .

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  • Coalsmoke
    replied
    Dan, I have never had a problem with them getting out of round, and usually they are between 3/8-1/2" wall thickness. However, I have always welded one side and then the other only after the first side has cooled below a couple hundred degrees. I really don't know if allowing the first side to cool and stabilize really makes that much of a difference, but I haven't really been brave enough to try it without letting it cool. Too much time and money lost if things went sour The clearance for the pin is about that of a fingernail thickness (~.020 total). We often don't use the o-rings on the machines around here. For some reason the o-rings were holding too much foriegn junk in, so we shim tighter and grease a bit more often. This helps to flush any foriegn material and seems to work better in the long run.

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  • Stick rod
    replied
    Looks good! I`m more comfy with a gas sheilded flux core wire,thats what I would have used.But you went with what is comfortable for you and that is what is important.It is still a good repair(I`m sure we could get in a discussion of what would be better to use etc..)Did you add a few more passes or leave it go as pictured?Sounds like you have got yourself a good thing starting, doing work for that particular company.Sometimes thats all it takes to get the ball rolling.Again nice job and you gotta love it when they tell you just fix it don`t worry alot about the cost!!

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  • dandimand
    replied
    Ive never done this stuff before but was wondering is there a pin that goes inside the part you welded and if so how much clearance was there ? reason i ask if your welding on a round tube does it not distort slightly or is it so heavy that it didnt ? just curious as i know when i weld wishbone track locators for race cars they have to be reamed after welding .

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  • jeepasaurusrex
    replied
    I do this kind of stuff for a living. Most of our boss material is supplied by Timkin as well. We weld all of our stuff with robotic welding wire (1/16" hardwire) and a mix of argon and oxygen. Pushing around 30 volts and about 275 amps.

    Check out some of our products at ASC Coupler

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  • Protraxrptr17
    replied
    I asked him about cutting some O-ring grooves or some kind of seals, but he said he also uses this thing to burn brushpiles, so seals would be toast in no time.

    Like I said before, TIG is definitely not the best choice for this repair because of the speed issue. But, that's what I'm most comfortable with right now. Hopefully by the middle of next month I'll have a brand new Invision 345/74DX combo to do this type of stuff.

    The customer picked the machine up this morning. He was very happy with the work and the bill. He said they definitely would be calling on me for all their work. It's a pretty large construciton company based in the same small town as my shop. Brought in an exhaust manifold today. Yesterday they brought in a steel hydraulic line. Wouldn't it be great if they brought something everyday?

    I ran some Hobart Excel Arc .045 today in the Mega-Mig. I think this would have worked great for welding that boss. I just don't feel 100% confident with it for big stuff like that. Can't get consistant results. I'm too accustomed to TIG. I can see exactly what's going on.

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  • cnslmva
    replied
    I would make sure that if the bucket has an adjustable boss on it that it is shimmed properly and that the rubber "o-rings" are in place when it is assembled. We had a Deere 450C LC (Hitachi's American cousin) that had chewed up the stick bushings, boss faces and bucket boss faces due to excessive slop in this joint.

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  • J hall
    replied
    Looks like a good repair.
    I would have suggested installing seals. It's going to be hard to keep the grease in there.
    Jeff

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  • Coalsmoke
    replied
    Originally posted by mmw
    Isn't it nice when they say "I don't care just fix it right"
    ---MMW---
    Yup, but it means you add better be darn sure that everything is how it should be, as your name will probably turn to mud PDQ if it falls apart again. Its easy to be steroetyped and be lumped in with the countless ohers that muck things up. Also, always check well for other fractures that might be aggravating to the failure. If found, gouge, weld and fish-plate.

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  • admweld
    replied
    MMW,232 or 212 innersheild wire.

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  • MMW
    replied
    ADMWELD---Lincoln NR-232?
    PROTRAX---Looks nice. Isn't it nice when they say "I don't care just fix it right"
    ---MMW---

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  • admweld
    replied
    I would have innersheild wire welded that just how i do it or 7018 stick5/32.nice work anyways.

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  • Coalsmoke
    replied
    So long as he's not billing for time, I don't think it really matters. Just as long as it has the required penetration (among other things). If it were my job, I'd be grabbing the 7018, but I live by stick, never tigged in my life, so that's a biased opinion

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