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Need something to cut sheet metal with

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  • burninbriar
    replied
    Originally posted by pjseaman
    Burninbriar:

    Great idea, where did you come up with that.

    Thanks,
    When I was in the sign trade I did a lot of panchanel letters and electrical signs and we used a lot of sheetmetal, brass and copper. Useing the styrafoam was sort of an industry standard in that environment.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Burninbriar:

    Great idea, where did you come up with that.

    Thanks,

    Leave a comment:


  • burninbriar
    replied
    If you want to use a jig saw, what I use uder the metal is 2" styrafoam sheet you can buy at any builder supply. It supports the sheetmetal flat and does not interfear with the jig saw blade. you can make meny meny cuts before the styrofoam is no longer useable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    I have an electric nibbler, made by milwaukee and it really cuts up to 14ga well. The best I've used!! Best of all my Father-in-Law gave it to me when he move to florida.

    Peace,

    Leave a comment:


  • 90blackcrx
    replied
    Originally posted by RadMan
    RC you are cutting out a car trunk, correct? a steel car trunk?
    The car is a hatchback, and in the back there is a cargo area that basically is mdf covered in carpet. Well the customer wants me to make it out of metal because he needs to keep his guns back there ( law enforcement ).

    Hank I will keep that in mind. lol nice song.

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    Bob,

    You need to think "portable" and "knock-down". Most of my larger projects get done on a temporary bench - two collapsible sawhorses with a pair of 2 x 6's laid on top, followed by a sheet of 3/4 AC or CDX ply (whichever I have on hand at the time!). When that stuff is not in use, the horses are folded, and the wood is stacked upright along the wall.

    That's the way (uhhuuhu) I like it!

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • RadMan
    replied
    RC you are cutting out a car trunk, correct? a steel car trunk?

    Leave a comment:


  • 90blackcrx
    replied
    Hank good idea but not sure if I can set up a table like that, I'm already running out of dam space.

    So is a nibble more accurate then shears ?

    Don't have to be perfect, I can go back and make it perfect with a grinder or something else.

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    Bbo,

    For stuff like you will be doing with large sheets and irregular cuts, I like my jig saw with bi-metal 14-TPI blades run on low speed. I have a "table" (a couple of pieces of 3/4" plywood glued together with a slot routed down the middle for the blade) that I set on top of the bench that allows the blade to move without hitting anything below it, and support the metal on the "table" and move the sheet around so I can always cut in the slot and not have the blade bottom put on anything. This lets me keep downward pressure on the saw to prevent "chatter" from the sheet being pulled up by the blade.

    Hank

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  • precisionworks
    replied
    RC - Didn't realize the workpiece was soooo big That moves the tooling right back to electric shear territory.

    Trumpf makes some of the nicest, most heavy-duty nibblers in the market. Their N 700-2 is an 18# tool with 1/4" capacity, but it's sorta pricey ...

    The N160e is rated for 16 Ga mild, 18 Ga SS, at less than $500.

    Leave a comment:


  • arcdawg
    replied
    I have a old b3 and I can wait to have a shop that I can mount it in They are really one of the best fab tools out there. they are *throatless* which means that you could cut something 10ft long if you had enough pairs of hands to feed it through.

    are they pricey sure but like was stated before you dont have to worry about air, fire hazards or consumibles (sp) just dont buy one from eastwood cause they will screw you on the price

    btw it would be nice to have a plasma too (ha)

    dawg

    Leave a comment:


  • 90blackcrx
    replied
    Originally posted by precisionworks
    Really? First thing that came to mind here.
    Well the piece of metal I will be working with will be around 3 feet by 6 feet, I just think that would be hard feeding it and holding it. I have used beverly sheers before and they are nice to cut smaller plates of metal.

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  • burninbriar
    replied
    Not to get too far from the subject, but I have been debateing the plasma purchase for a long time, you don't seem too impressed with them. I may need to study the pro's and con's some more.

    Leave a comment:


  • precisionworks
    replied
    burninbriar -

    You're exactly right, the B1 excels on lighter material. Some of my custom-bike-builder friends prefer that model.

    I use lots of 1/8" sheet, so the B2 works better for me.

    IMO, any of the Beverly Shears are preferred to plaz. No HAZ to contend with, no fumes to exhaust, no requirement for super-clean & super dry air, no consummables to replace, AND no plaz to purchase!

    Leave a comment:


  • RadMan
    replied
    I work with sheet metal(all kinds) on a regular basis, I use a jig saw, i also use a small angle grinder with a 0.045" cutting disc, great for hackin the tabs off a radiator.
    My favorite tool is my shear/brake/roll, very usefull for sheet metal work.
    Almost forgot...vertical woodworking bandsaw, ideal for aluminum.

    Leave a comment:

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