Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Wood burning stove for garage

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • katiebo
    replied
    Another option to consider would be a pellet/corn stove. The fuel is cheap ($1-2 per day). Many models have 3 or 4 heat settings that allow for a continous regulated heat output that make burning for extended periods easy. They have a hopper (30-50lb capacity) that one has to fill and the ash is easy to handle too. The only drawback is that they are not cheap. Though it might be worth the mention in the spirit of looking at all options available. Good Luck.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    My sister has a house they built from scratch with infloor heat. The contractor screwed up the heat zones, but after they got it sorted, it's been a very nice system. No cold feet.

    It does take longer to respond than a gas/blower heater, but if you're not losing massive amounts of heat due to bay doors opening and closing all the time, it would be ideal (like for my intended use).

    Leave a comment:


  • Stick rod
    replied
    Originally posted by Fishy Jim

    My goal has always been to do in-floor heat via hot water (glycol mix) if I build a shop from scratch, but the radiators would be a cheap alternative to more expensive methods. No issues with blowing shielding gasses away either.
    Buddy of mine has a 60x120 shop with 20' ceilings and it has in floor heat.That is the cats meow.we once did repairs to a lo-boy trailer that was covered wit 2+inches of snow,brought it in the shop at quiting time and by morning it was melted off and the floor was dry under it.Sure made working on the floor a lot nicer.Blowing away the sheilding gas isn`t a problem either.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    Anyone use the old cast iron radiators and a water heater?

    My goal has always been to do in-floor heat via hot water (glycol mix) if I build a shop from scratch, but the radiators would be a cheap alternative to more expensive methods. No issues with blowing shielding gasses away either.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeepasaurusrex
    replied
    Our personal best was 3.5 cords in one day. Cut, split, and stacked. My *** was dragging at the end though. It was mostly alder and maple, easy to split. Also didi that a few years ago, now I have a couple more years under my belt and dont think I would be up to it again!

    Leave a comment:


  • 90blackcrx
    replied
    Sticking with kerosene. I used it more and more since I posted this thread, and it heats up the garage really well. I let it run for 20 mins and turned it off, kept the garage hot for about 1 hour.

    So its time to insulate the garage next summer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Coalsmoke
    replied
    thanks for the clarification, I thought someone said they were burning two chords in a day dropping, bucking, splitting, and stacking is hard pressed for 1 person to get more than a single chord done in a day, from what I've found. Others stronger / faster than myself may get better results, but that is a fair bit of wood. We used to sell firewood, got a tree farm instead. Growing christmas trees is way easier than the firewood game.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zapit
    replied
    Its not hard to cut/split a few cords of wood in a day
    I was refering to the above quote from Jeepasaurusrex about cutting a couple of cords of wood in a day. I define "cutting wood" as the whole process--from tree to stacked neatly. Now some may end up with a couple of cords in a day---but that is an awful lot of work in a short period of time.

    Now, if you mean "cutting" as in bucking up enough to make a couple of cords, that's different---but if you add in the splitting and stacking--way more than I want to do in a day.

    I burn wood to heat my house--up here in the Pacific Northwest and I have used just under a cord so far this winter---I have 3 more stacked up--just in case it gets really cold---I have a brother-in-law who runs his own logging outfit so wood is easy to come by--it's the preparing it to fit in a stove that's not quite so easy---but good work-out for shoulders and back

    Leave a comment:


  • Coalsmoke
    replied
    2 cords a day ?????? didn't someone tell them to put it in the fireplace first? we burn our airtight 24/7 in the winter (october to may) and burn between 1 - 2 wheelbarrows of wood per 24hrs, depending on the temperature outside.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zapit
    replied
    Well, I'll chime in---I heat my house with wood and agree with most of what has been said. You need to think about a year in advance--so if you cut wood now---you are doing it for next winter. Yes, it is time consuming and question the 2 cords a day figure. 2 cords is a stack 16' long x 4' wide x 4' high. I haul my wood in a little Ford Ranger and it take about 3 to 4 loads to make a cord.(I need a bigger truck!!!) All that said--I actually enjoy cutting and splitting the wood and I tolerate the stacking. And I get the wood for "free" meaning I don't have to buy the wood. and hey it makes a good excuse to buy a new tool once in a while (chainsaw, splitting maul, etc.

    anyway I've rambled on enough---I think I'll go work some more on next years wood!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Last year I helped my buddy build a logsplitter, money well spent, $350 and he split 4 cords in the first weekend.

    Peace,

    Leave a comment:


  • jeepasaurusrex
    replied
    When I had my shop, I had a big custom built wood stove in it. I would fire it up in the morning when I woke up, and by the time breakfast was done the shop would be warm. I also plumbed in some copper tubing from a metal container and would feed used motor oil into the fire after it got hot. My parents live right on a river, and every time it floods (every fall) I would use a grappling hook we fab'd up to hook trees that were floating by. Let them swing into the bank and tie them off. After the water went down, we would break out the saws. Its not hard to cut/split a few cords of wood in a day. Let it dry all summer and enjoy the free heat in the fall and winter. I had a cheep redneck blower on mine. 24" Box fan from WalMart.

    Leave a comment:


  • Portable Welder
    replied
    I have a wood stove in my shop along with my furnace, I only burn wood as long as I come across it for free other wise its not an economical thing to do.
    I enjoy having a wood stove, however when we have alot of work going on we dont have time to mess with it, so we just leave the furnace on.

    My furnace is one of the home made types, I made my own triple wall plenum for the stove pipe to go through the wall. and the smoke pipe outside is a 6" x 6" x 3/16" thick with a footing on the outside of the building.
    A friend of mine who owns a HVAC company just lauphed when he looked at my set up. I asked him what he thought about my set up and he said it by far exceeds any ratings that they have out there.
    That made me feel lucky that I did it right.
    Note I realize the 3/16 wall tubing was a slight over kill but it was free so I used it.

    As many of you said however if the stove is not UL rated the insurance companys does'nt care if its made out of 2" plate. all they care about is that UL rating.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    For Bob's shop, that could be the "hot" (har har) ticket.

    Leave a comment:


  • lgjhn
    replied
    Originally posted by 90blackcrx
    Anyone own one ? If so how do you like it ? I was looking at this one just to see what there all about

    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...=47723&R=47723

    One load last 5 hours , for the price of wood compared to how much kersene cost, that sounds really nice.

    Any opinions ? Probably look into it more for next year, maybe insult the garage, seal it up really good. Garage is a 2 car but actually is a little bigger, how many btu should I be looking at do you think ?
    I have an old, old Ashley wood stove out in my shop that looks just like that and I use it in the winter to take the chill off. But heating/cooling a shop leads to lots of humidity = rust.
    As many have stated on here, wood can be a pain to regulate and when you do regulate it to get a long burn, you end up creosoting the chimney. Plus, you gotta split it, dry it, carry it, etc. etc. etc.

    If you're into fabbing things in your shop and you change your own motor oil in your vehicles, you might try one of these:
    http://journeytoforever.org/biofuel_.../me4.html#mwoh

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X