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  • 90blackcrx
    replied
    Originally posted by Fishy Jim
    Grainger.com

    You need an account though.
    Never mind that one went over your head.

    Leave a comment:


  • Coalsmoke
    replied
    I think you can get them in the twenty somethings up here, for the long canadian winters

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    Grainger.com

    You need an account though.

    Leave a comment:


  • 90blackcrx
    replied
    Originally posted by RadMan
    I buy latex by the 100 pk
    Largest I have seen them is in 12 packs

    Leave a comment:


  • RadMan
    replied
    I buy latex by the 100 pk

    Leave a comment:


  • 90blackcrx
    replied
    Originally posted by Fishy Jim
    I wear gloves too, just not constantly.

    Any of you wear latex while working? I hated that when I was in the clean room, but I know a few mechanics who love them because of the clean up factor.
    I wear latex gloves when ever I work on cars. It sucks having to clean your hands everytime you need to go inside to eat or anything like that.

    Ok practice on pipe, that helps. But should I be doing it like mig ? Or should I be basically looking from the side, rather then head on ?

    Anyone know about my fillet question ?

    Leave a comment:


  • Coalsmoke
    replied
    only when painting (especially with xylene thinned paints) and if working with oiled foundry sand.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Tips on welding pipe? Yes, just one practice practice practice! That is the only way believe me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    I wear gloves too, just not constantly.

    Any of you wear latex while working? I hated that when I was in the clean room, but I know a few mechanics who love them because of the clean up factor.

    Leave a comment:


  • 90blackcrx
    replied
    Originally posted by Fishy Jim
    Bob, who's your hand model? I wouldn't believe you actually did any work seeing those clean fingers.
    That would be me, I wash my hands a lot. I have ocd .

    lol back to my fillet question.

    Leave a comment:


  • RadMan
    replied
    gloves......

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  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    Bob, who's your hand model? I wouldn't believe you actually did any work seeing those clean fingers.

    Leave a comment:


  • 90blackcrx
    replied
    Here are some of my fillet welds.

    http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y72...letweld005.jpg
    http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y72...letweld004.jpg
    http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y72...letweld003.jpg
    http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y72...letweld002.jpg



    My question is, I know you are suppose to tilt the torch about 70 degrees, but are you suppose to tilt it towards the end of the piece at all ? Find it really hard to get filler in there, and to keep the puddle moving when I don't aim towards the end of the piece.

    Leave a comment:


  • 90blackcrx
    replied
    Yeah I do sit down. And I'm not really trying to do the stack of dime look. I form the puddle and dip the rod, and keep moving. Sometimes I will run into the problem with the puddle getting to big, thats when I will slow down.

    So any tips on fillet welds ? Should I be pointing the arc at the gap, or should I focus it on the bottom piece.

    Leave a comment:


  • unixadm
    replied
    The beads are looking better. Personally, try to get used to the puddle and how it moves in relation to the torch movements. The high definition stack of dimes look can come later in reality. I've been practicing by establishing the puddle, insert the tip of the filler and then gently move the torch along, expanding the puddle and consuming the filler. That will keep the movements on your left hand a lot less as your not dabbing the filler and give you more focus on puddle control. Having a consistent bead in width and height IMO is more important than having the stack of dimes look. Once you get good with creating nice beads with good penetration and no undercut, you can move on to other techniques to make it look cool. On steel, I like the smooth look. On intake tubing (aluminum), I like the smooth look. On certain frames and weldments, the stack of dimes look if done right looks really trick. It helps set off the fact that you are a good weldor because you can instantly pick out the process type in most cases, just by looking at the bead. You can even get the stack of dimes look with pulsing and how you move the torch. There is a lot to it.

    Do you weld sitting down, with your forearms or elbows resting on the table? Long term, you need to be universal in how you weld. However in the early stages, use everything you can to help maintain consistent arc length, torch movement, angle and filler addition.

    Fillets to me are by far the most difficult. I now know why I keep my hair cut short, as I'd be pulling it out of I didn't.

    Leave a comment:

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