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Homemade Tig cooler question

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  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    I got mine for $30 and change delivered. I looked into getting a 220v motor for it (since my fans are 220v - as is the welder), but that might break the bank at $80 for a new one. I'm going to keep my eyes open for another motor via my usual sources. There very well could be one at another location my surplus place runs (and I'll be down by it tomorrow).

    Procon pumps are used in all the commercial coolers. It has to do with the duty cycle of the pump and expected lifespan of it's internals - while being able to provide the pressure needed to keep cavitation from occurring in the torch body (where the air in the water boils off and makes an insulated pocket from being able to transfer the heat into the coolant). You can get a whole carbonator (same pump) for under $100 with a co2 tank on ebay, or you can keep an eye out for the pumps and motors. You'll be better off buying a pump attached to a motor, because the drive coupler is around $15 separately.

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  • RadMan
    replied
    I'm sure you could get a free old computer for the power supply if you looked locally on craigslist. People have to pay to recycle them, so giving it to you would help them out.[/QUOTE]


    I think have have 2 or 3 working power supplies, Jim, plus many dead ones with no fans lol, i love em for the free parts.


    you like procon pumps? at $250 american?

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  • RadMan
    replied
    [QUOTE=Fishy Jim]Could work. I'd use a bigger fan over the little ones though. I got those 6"s for $12.50 a piece brand new (old stock - pulled them out of the styrofoam package myself).

    I suspect you are correct, I will be cooling a (hopefully) very small, very light liquid cooled torch, welding at 50 to 70 amps, I dont think this setup would compliment a syncrowave 250

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  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    Could work. I'd use a bigger fan over the little ones though. I got those 6"s for $12.50 a piece brand new (old stock - pulled them out of the styrofoam package myself).

    I'm sure you could get a free old computer for the power supply if you looked locally on craigslist. People have to pay to recycle them, so giving it to you would help them out.

    Leave a comment:


  • RadMan
    replied
    This thread really has me thinking..........

    I'm gunna start with this, cost so far... $0.....gotta find another dead power supply............

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  • Sundown
    replied
    Originally posted by RadMan
    I think you fella's are making a mountain out of a mole hill, it seems to me that periodic changing of the 'electrolyte' is all that is needed.

    Cooling system problems almost always has to do with neglect, that has been my experience.


    Start with distilled water and a glycol based coolant , change it out from time to time and you are good to go
    I have to agree, I was thinking that during the winter I might put some RV antifreeze in with the water, its glycol based and cheap.....for the spring-summer-fall water will do for around here. I got the paint done, but have some sags on the wrapper due to the cold...guess I wll sand them out tomorrow and see if I can get an finish coat on.

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  • RadMan
    replied
    Originally posted by Fishy Jim
    Have you seen the crud electrolysis makes out of "clean" water? Rust and other oxidation is rampant in automotive cooling systems. That's why they use such high ratios of antifreeze - so you can get all those free oxygen molecules tied up with other elements so they don't eat away the metal.

    Rust is a big problem in sealed systems. A filter (clear is actually good being upstream of the pump) will tell you the state of the systems health. I'm also conjuring up a way to make a flow indicator. I want to know how my torch is doing.

    I think you fella's are making a mountain out of a mole hill, it seems to me that periodic changing of the 'electrolyte' is all that is needed.

    Cooling system problems almost always has to do with neglect, that has been my experience.


    Start with distilled water and a glycol based coolant , change it out from time to time and you are good to go

    Leave a comment:


  • Sundown
    replied
    Jim,

    Looks like that setup should handle anything the #20 torch can handle.

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  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    No prob at all.

    I'll be buying a drill press or a bandsaw before I get a better still camera.

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  • RST200
    replied
    Hope you don't mind Jim, the photos are alittle dark. I made them alittle lighter. That fan set-up looks nice...
    Attached Files

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  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    Some pics of what I've got thus far:

    http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y24...m/AUT_0518.jpg
    Some small propane bottle I got free. Will be mounted horizontally with bottom tap and top inlet snorkel (so the fill tube will be above everything else in the system).

    http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y24...m/AUT_0519.jpg
    Air conditioning condenser of unknown origin (got it for $20 as surplus - still full of freon no less). Carbonator pump (procon 150gph) in the background.

    http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y24...m/AUT_0520.jpg
    Side view of the three core condenser. 3/8" OD copper cores in AL fins. 1/4" barbs soldered in on both ends.

    http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y24...m/AUT_0521.jpg
    And these are my lovely 220V 35W 6" fans. If you thought your welder fan was loud... lol My hand got cold testing these suckers. $12.50 each (new, surplus), but I got a voucher for $5 free stuff since I spent over $25.

    I've got all the hose connection issues sorted, just need to get some final parts and the cooler will be complete. I'm not working any more on this till after I get the christmas present projects done. I also will be buying a 220v pump motor, so if anyone needs a 115V motor for their raw pump - email me. I'll send you this one for $5 over actual shipping cost.

    Last but not least - the money shot. Weldcraft #20 with 25' rubber hoses (I still need to get the collets, lenses, and all that stuff for it).

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  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    I've just been soldering the barbs on my condenser - it holds 90 psi without any problems.

    Frank, email me with info on the flow indicator. I might be willing to relieve you of the extra.

    I'm also installing a cheapy (99 cents at my surplus place) campbell hausfeld psi gauge. Not sure how it'll like water, but we'll soon find out. lol

    Leave a comment:


  • Sundown
    replied
    I forgot to mention that I am going to install a brass drain valve in the rear bottom of the water pan, I plan on draining the system and refilling it often as I am going to use demineralized water with out any additive in it. Also I think I am going to use overcenter clamps to hold the pan to the pump so that I can remove the pan easily (that part just came to me as I was typing, I will have to see if it will work the way I vision it, guess I should have thought of that before I installed a fill tube and screw on cap, now if that works I guess I don't need the drain valve either ).

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  • Sundown
    replied
    Originally posted by frank865
    I don't think a plastic filter would be a good choice @ 50 psi, unless you were planning to put it in the return line?
    I'm going to use the pick-up "sock" from an electric fuel pump (Various sizes & shapes, about $5) on the suction tube.
    Acually the filters have metal ends and barbs with glass filter chambers, but I do know the ones you are thinking of, they were more common and also cheaper. But now that you mention the pickup sock I think that it will work better with the pickup tubing I am using. Do you have any idea where I can get one to fit a 3/8" ID tube?

    BTW, the hard work is done. Now I need to decide on the paint job, find somewhere warm enough to paint it, glue the gasket on the roaster, make two small holddown brackets, and assemble...plumb...& wire the electrics. Hopefully I can have some pictures to post by Monday. Guess I better decide which torch I want & who to order it from.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sundown
    replied
    Originally posted by Fishy Jim
    Have you seen the crud electrolysis makes out of "clean" water? Rust and other oxidation is rampant in automotive cooling systems. That's why they use such high ratios of antifreeze - so you can get all those free oxygen molecules tied up with other elements so they don't eat away the metal.

    Rust is a big problem in sealed systems. A filter (clear is actually good being upstream of the pump) will tell you the state of the systems health. I'm also conjuring up a way to make a flow indicator. I want to know how my torch is doing.
    I priced the flow indicator Miller uses on the CM3 at $16.50, not a bad price, I chose to use a 2.5" panel mount psi guage for $2.95 from surplus supply. When the pump is working the needle is rock solid at whatever psi you set it to, If anything disrupts the flow the needle go's nuts at once.

    Also I thought you guys might be interested in this:
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:

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