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Stopping rust on raw metal

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  • Slash
    replied
    Originally posted by 90blackcrx
    wd-40 is not ment to be used as a pentrating oil, from my understandings at least.

    +1

    WD-40 is not a lubricant/penetrant, despite the marketing propaganda and wive's tales. WD has minimal lubricaing properties as applied from the can. What's worse, WD will polymerize over time and it is a PITA to remove, it will really 'Gunk-Up' any precision parts. The worst thing you can do for a firearm/fishing reel/micrometer/etc is to drown it with WD and put it away for long term storage.

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  • KS2K
    replied
    PickleX20

    I use a product called Pickle X 20 to protect bare steel. For example, when building a truck over the winter, I will blast the body to bare steel in the late fall and apply Pickle X 20. No rust will form on the steel during the winter. In the spring I can make ready for painting.

    When I buy sheet steel, I apply a application of Pickle X 20 to both sides. Its totally safe from rust from moisture or fingers.

    here is the web site;
    www.picklex20.com

    Paul

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  • pullerguy
    replied
    I don't worry about the surface rust. Just clean the area were you are going to weld. the i wash the chassis with soap and water,let it dry then paint it with POR 15. works like magic and it likes some rust to lock onto. Al

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  • Chopper
    replied
    I use naval jelly, works pretty good most of the time. Can get it at local hardware store usually. And no funny remarks about that either

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  • fun4now
    replied
    i love thouse chanels about the only thing on TV werth watching well i have the discovery and history chanel but not the lerning wish i did

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  • burninbriar
    replied
    I saw on the discovery chanel that nasa had it developed for the space project. Mayby I misunderstood and they just adopted it. Another interesting fact acording to them is no one but a handfull of people in the company knows how its made. The show I watched was called the history of oil.( it might have been the learning or history channel, not sure)

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  • AV8OR
    replied
    Originally posted by MAC702
    General trivia: The "WD" in WD-40 stands for "Water Displacement" It was invented for the USAF to spray down the ballistic missiles in underground silos to help repvent corrosion due to the constant condensation.
    ……and the dash 40 stands for the 40th try before they got the right recipe that worked.

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  • Tanner
    replied
    Working, mostly. I've been in the hospital visiting a friend, one of my biker friends that is 20 years old had a stroke...so, yeah. I've also been riding my bikes a lot, almost too much. Not much welding going on, I have yet to get all my welders in order, and it's just been hectic. I still read a lot of the forum here, just don't post too often. Thanks for worrying about me, PJ! Take care, all!

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Tanner--where have you been, missed you.

    Be cool,

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  • Tanner
    replied
    I run WD-40 in my hydraulic brake lines on my bike. Works like a champ. Oh! DON'T PUT WD-40 ON A BIKE CHAIN! That is all.

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  • 90blackcrx
    replied
    Originally posted by fun4now
    walmart also carries there own brand of wd-40 in a black can that in my expereance workd better than wd-40 at everything and at $0.94 a can ya cant go rong. as a penitraiting oil it is great. I also use it on my welding table to keep the surface from rusting light coat and you are good to go.

    wd-40 is not ment to be used as a pentrating oil, from my understandings atleast.

    Thanks for all the suggestions guys, I do use a rust-oleum product but that happens way down the line.

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  • MAC702
    replied
    General trivia: The "WD" in WD-40 stands for "Water Displacement" It was invented for the USAF to spray down the ballistic missiles in underground silos to help repvent corrosion due to the constant condensation.

    Of course, naturally it works great on firearms, fishing reels, tools, you name it.

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    keep in mind if useing it on your welding table wipe the table down after you aplie the oil as it is flamible. dont realy want to leave puddles of it around or put that much on.

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  • fun4now
    replied
    walmart also carries there own brand of wd-40 in a black can that in my expereance workd better than wd-40 at everything and at $0.94 a can ya cant go rong. as a penitraiting oil it is great. I also use it on my welding table to keep the surface from rusting light coat and you are good to go.

    Leave a comment:


  • SparkyatMACC
    replied
    Any dent, pit, or surface defect weakens the material. All cracks start on a molecular level where the atoms are misaligned (i.e. a dent, rust pit, manufacturing defect, whatever). This is the reason you want a weld with the least amount a bubbles or illregularity. However, most of the time you need not worry because 99% of the time these defects (or surface quality as it it referred to) are accounted for in the strength rating of the material. If you want a more scientific explanation I can reference some books for you.

    Sparky

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