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Stopping rust on raw metal

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  • burninbriar
    replied
    Very interesting.

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  • hurricunning
    replied
    WD-40, Welding and Phosgene gas

    I don't want to ruin anyone's day here but WD-40 and other spray lube/solvent type products should be used with much caution around the welding arc! Even though some feel WD-40 smells great when sprayed on hot metal and is a great rust preventative/metal cooler/quencher the UV light of the arc and even the heat of welded metal may cause it to disassociate and produce Phosgene gas. This gas is extremely toxic. It was used in chemical warfare during WW1. It can be irritating to the lungs and/or deadly! See some of the following info in the sites below...

    http://www.bt.cdc.gov/agent/phosgene/basics/facts.asp
    http://www.osha.gov/doc/outreachtrai.../weldhlth.html


    CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON SOLVENTS

    Various chlorinated hydrocarbons are used in degreasing or other cleaning operations. The vapours of these solvents are a concern in welding and cutting because the heat and ultraviolet radiation from the arc will decompose the vapours and form highly toxic and irritating phosgene gas. (See Phosgene.)

    PHOSGENE

    Phosgene is formed by decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents by ultraviolet radiation. It reacts with moisture in the lungs to produce hydrogen chloride, which in turn destroys lung tissue. For this reason, any use of chlorinated solvents should be well away from welding operations or any operation in which ultraviolet radiation or intense heat is generated.
    This was drilled into me years ago by my 1st Welding instructor. I just thought I would return the favour.

    Another sneaky welding danger is welding on Cad-plated bolts...another topic for safety that should be mentioned. Maybe we should have a safety thread where some of the things that can bite you in the welding trade could be documented for all the new or unaware people?

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  • TOMWELDS
    replied
    Originally posted by MAC702
    General trivia: The "WD" in WD-40 stands for "Water Displacement" It was invented for the USAF to spray down the ballistic missiles in underground silos to help repvent corrosion due to the constant condensation.

    Of course, naturally it works great on firearms, fishing reels, tools, you name it.
    Thats correct Mac. And the '40' stands for: it was made after the fortieth try.
    You cant go wrong with using WD-40 as a rust preventative. It also makes wiping off the oil easier. It loosens it and then you can finish with paint thinner.

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  • burninbriar
    replied
    I've also used it to loosen some glues, It would be an interesting topic to see how many diferant ways people use WD40 , kind of like a duct tape thing.

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  • fun4now
    replied
    he he he yep do that a lot too, seems like i go through a lot of the stuff

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  • burninbriar
    replied
    It makes a prettygood small parts cleaner in a pinch too.

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  • fun4now
    replied
    i would have to say i too am a fan, and use it on my welding table regularly

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  • burninbriar
    replied
    The only problem I have ever had with WD40 is when it is on something exposed (uncovered) it has a tendency to evaporate over time and leave the peice unprotected. In general I am a WD40 fan.

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  • fun4now
    replied
    i have a set of paddel bits for wood drilling i keep on the shelf sandwitched between 2 folded shop towels that i sprayed down with wd-40 or the walmart equivilent and 3 years later not a spot of surface rust to be found, so i would conclude it dose infact repell moisture. this is a shop with lil to no inselation untill recently as it was a 12'X12' tool shed to start with so the moistur level is plenty high, and rust is abundent on anything not protected. so i supose it would come down to the aplication you are useing it for and what you wish to acheave. i would never use it on any of my guns as they make a special oil for guns and to use anything else would just be risky, in a pinch i supose i might use it on a gun for short term but would clean and oil it properly as soon as possible

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  • aametalmaster
    replied
    I just use it on the outside to help remove fingerprints, sprayed on an old sock. I use gun oil on the insides...Bob

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  • Slash
    replied
    Originally posted by aametalmaster
    I disagree, I hose my lathe down everytime i use it with WD-40. Everything still shines like the day it was put in service. What would you rather buy a gun that was hosed down with WD or one that wasn't wiped off at all. I have guns sitting in my safe that i looked at the other day and they look great. The last time i had seen them was 5 years ago when i sprayed them with WD and put them away. But to each his own...Bob
    Fortunately, those aren't the only choices.

    WD40 is a marginal protectant, it won't harm the outside of your guns. The problem is inside. While everything may look shiny on the exterior, things might not be so pretty inside. Over time, WD40 will turn to varnish (polymerize), gumming up the action/trigger.

    Case-in-point:
    I have a friend who inherited a Browning O/U from his father. Not knowing much about guns, he dosed it with WD40 and stashed it away in the back of a closet about six years ago. After a recent rash of burglaries in his neighborhood, he asked if I would allow him to store the shotgun in my safe. When he brought it to me, the action was 'frozen' shut - the lever wouldn't even move. After nearly a week of daily applications of KROIL, I was finally able to break it open. The entire action was jammed up by the dried-out WD40. My ultrasonic cleaner wouldn't touch the stuff, I ended up soaking all of the metal parts in laquer thinner to get the gunk cleaned off.

    This isn't the only gun I've seen neutralized by WD40. If you insist one using WD40 on your guns, please limit it to the outside only.

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  • bigdogjoe62
    replied
    I remember reading in a scandal rag WD-40 also helps with arthritis rub it into your joints LOL

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  • wb5jhy
    replied
    I use a product called Zep 45. It displaces water much better and preserves metal longer.

    For real long term storage I use Iron Clad also from Zep.

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  • fatfrank
    replied
    Originally posted by Slash
    +1

    The worst thing you can do for a firearm/fishing reel/micrometer/etc is to drown it with WD and put it away for long term storage.
    I agree with the metal master, that isn't the worst thing you can do to them.

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  • aametalmaster
    replied
    I disagree, I hose my lathe down everytime i use it with WD-40. Everything still shines like the day it was put in service. What would you rather buy a gun that was hosed down with WD or one that wasn't wiped off at all. I have guns sitting in my safe that i looked at the other day and they look great. The last time i had seen them was 5 years ago when i sprayed them with WD and put them away. But to each his own...Bob

    Leave a comment:

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