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  • #16
    I think real electricians take some of this for granted after a while but I been at this a while and still find some intricate code and design aspects that never occur to me with simple cord and plug.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Bsawyer1 View Post

      https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...1RKZTZD48&th=1
      https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...DKIKX0DER&th=1

      So Running these 2 with a 8 Gauge AWS and a 50 AMp breaker and ill be golden, sound good?
      Yes, that will work perfectly.

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      • #18
        You should be able to get those at any hardware store right now. Might cost a little more than Amazon, but if you want it now, Lowe’s, Home Depot, ace, menard’s, etc.

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        • #19
          I always use the 4-wire nema 14-50 with neutral, and 6awg wire, because who knows what you or someone else will want to plug in in the future. Downsizing to 8awg doesn't save much money, but does mean the receptacle has to be strictly dedicated to a single welding machine with a limited duty cycle.

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          • #20
            I know a lot of guys future proof, it doesnt hurt but I never had it happen. Where the extra conductor is good is if a guy wants to put a panel. Can often go around old or existing wire and have a new 120V tool circuit. Gives a local breaker too.
            That is quite a starter machine.

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            • #21
              A 50A breaker with 8ga wire doesn't need to be a dedicated welder circuit. A 50A breaker with conductors smaller than 8ga would need to be dedicated to a non-continuous load, which may or may no be a welder.

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              • #22
                As I understand it, per 110.14C, you have to use the temperature rating of the terminations if it is lower than the temperature rating of the wire. This means that you have to use the 60C column even if you have 75C or 90C wire, since the receptacle has a 60C rating. Also, unless you're in chicago, or just like bending pipe for the exercise, you're probably going to use NM-B (romex), which is limited to 60C regardless of the rating of its internal conductors.

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                • #23
                  You are probably right, its been so long since I read aby of that and didnt always understand it well anyway. I think you mean,,, he needs number 6 if using cable?

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                  • #24
                    Most of you guys know more about electricity than I do anyway. My only forum peeve is when someone jumps in with .... you cant,,, when it pertains to a legal circuit followed by the only thing a breaker does is protect the wire in the wall which it really only does on general use circuits with multiple outlets.

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