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Who else keeps their Sticks in the refrigerator?

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  • Who else keeps their Sticks in the refrigerator?

    When I was a kid, my grandfather used to have an old defunct Kelvinator that he stored all his electrodes in, with a light bulb burning 24/7. He thought it told me it kept them dry and just like a good grandson, I believed him. Years later and armed with college degrees, I instrumented-up that old fridge and determined that was BS. 40%+ humidity in that monster Since I was then acquiring welding gear of my own, I opted to not follow grandpa's advice and instead just used ziplocks and desiccant packs like I did with gunpowder (we lived on the coast in Southern California)
    Now retired to the high-desert and setting up my shop I began to rethink the whole problem and whilst sitting and thinking, was admiring my brand new shop refrigerator and marveling how when ever you closed the door a vacuum was pulled so it would not generate any frost and... wait a minute.. I put a humidity gauge inside that baby... 11%!!
    So now my 3D printing filament, gun powder, AND 6013 are all chiilin' in the fridge
    and I need to get another one cuz, now there's no room for the beer.

  • #2
    I live on the gulf coast. If I want to bet serious about storing my low hydrogen rod, it has to be a rod oven. I’ll have to look, but if I can find it, I got an excellent article from Lincoln about electrode storage and temps and it’s put in terms that a dummy like me can understand it.

    But unless you’re welding on things that are critical, I don’t think you’ll reap the benefits of a 24/7 rod oven. I have one of those barrel size ones and two portable. But from time to time I weld on things like heavy trucks, heavy truck trailers, etc. So for me, I prefer to keep my rods stabilized to the manufacturer’s recommendations. And it makes a difference. Once you’ve ran old, coffee can 7018 and then some stabilized 7018, you can tell.

    But you definitely need a beer fridge. All productivity should cease until that problem is corrected.

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    • #3
      I have a couple of 50lb cans of opened 7018....Atom Arc and Excalibur. They've been open for a couple of years and burn perfectly. The only difference I see to rod straight out of a sealed container is the start a touch easier. For anything but code work or something like a truck frame that Ryan mentioned it's not worth the extra effort.

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      • #4
        I would say it's all about where ya live and your Weather.....I'm in NorCal East of SF by about 40 miles...average humidity around 45-50% though in the winter if it's not raining it can be in the teens. I've got boxes and cans of series 60 & 70 Rod that have been riding around in the service truck for decades...never had a problem, although from time to time I throw some of it away.....just because I'm feeling guilty or the label on the box is not readable.....I've had guys try to give me old rod that seems as if the shielding is falling off or turning to powder or showing rust spots.....and that's where I draw the line between good or bad.

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        • #5
          I’d say that’s a good indicator of when it’s time to toss it.....when the flux is crumbling away! Definitely don’t go welding on any bridges with it at least!

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          • #6
            Dunno what the actual time difference would be, but rejuvenation of 7018 is recommended to be 5-800F for 2 hours- approximae rod tip temps run around 7 THOUSAND F - I'm thinking that'd shorten rejuve time by quite a bit, might explain why we get away with it (unless it's a code thing of course) ... Steve

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            • #7
              I know we sold piles of small sealed cans to the gas company. They open them and use 3 or 4 sticks and throw the rest away
              Bob Wright

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              • #8
                This is what got me to start thinking about storing my stuff in dryer conditions....
                Attached Files

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                • #9
                  I wouldn’t say that 6013 doesn’t require stabilization, but I’ve never kept anything other than low hydrogen stabilized and I don’t know anyone else who has. I’m certain the book will say they need to be, but I doubt I ever will. In fact, I believe reading that the storage temp between 6013 and low hydrogen is considerably different. I’m not really sure what you’d use 6013 for. I don’t think I’ve ever considered it on a job. If I was using it around the farm, it’s highly unlikely that I would have paid that little bit of rust any attention at all. The rod oven is for the flux composition for the most part anyway anyway. As long as the flux isn’t falling off it’ll probably run fine.

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                  • #10
                    Welding rod comes from my local welding supply in individually plastic wrapped cardboard boxes of about 8 lbs.(3.63 kgs.) I put it into one of these type of containers after opening (except for lo-hy which now goes to an oven): https://www.amazon.com/Forney-93097-...%2C1998&sr=8-2
                    ---Meltedmetal

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