Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Gasoline question?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Gasoline question?

    A while back I bought a used Miller Bobcat 225g. Cleaned it up changed the carburetor and got it running good. I did this and other preparations in order to start up my own little mobile welding business, now that I'm retired. BUT, going on a little over 2 months now and no one has called me for any business. Which brings me to my gasoline question. How long and how often do I need to crank and run this welder to keep the gas from gelling in the system again?

    Thanks for the info.

  • #2
    I recommend shutting off fuel and running the carb dry if you're not going to use it for a bit. a pair of vise grips on the hose between the tank and the fuel pump, if there's no shutoff **** (I don't remember what the 225g has), start it, and let it idle until it stalls.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Bushytails View Post
      I recommend shutting off fuel and running the carb dry if you're not going to use it for a bit. a pair of vise grips on the hose between the tank and the fuel pump, if there's no shutoff **** (I don't remember what the 225g has), start it, and let it idle until it stalls.
      I have put a shut off in the line. I have not had a lot of luck doing that with my lawn mowers or other small engines though.

      Comment


      • #4
        Every time you start it up, you fill the carb with fresh gas, which then evaporates and builds up another layer of varnish... starting it repeatedly, unless you start it so frequently as to not let the gas in the carb evaporate, just makes it worse. I've had the best luck with running the carb bone dry before storage.

        Comment


        • #5
          I do concrete work on the side here in Arizona. During the summer months, I do what Bushy does. Shut off the fuel to my compactor, run the engine til it dies, add some Stabil and when summer is over, a couple of pulls and the engine fires right up.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Metjunkie View Post
            I do concrete work on the side here in Arizona. During the summer months, I do what Bushy does. Shut off the fuel to my compactor, run the engine til it dies, add some Stabil and when summer is over, a couple of pulls and the engine fires right up.
            So, don't need to drain the tank, just put Stabil in it? And close the fuel valve and run it dry.

            Comment


            • #7
              I have a little more in-depth process, and I agree completely with the run it out of fuel thing too. On my equipment that I run infrequently, I drain the fuel out of the tank and put SOME 110 race fuel in it. I run the machine until I can smell a change in the exhaust, then I run the carb out of fuel.

              For machines that need to stay fully fueled, like an emergency backup generator, I keep them full of 110. It’s expensive, but since I’ve been doing this, I have had zero fuel related break downs. I do this with both 2 and 4 stroke small engines.

              The extra cost in fuel, for me, has been well worth it. I keep my regular fuel in cans and write the date on it. If it sits for 90 days it gets ran through my daily driver (wore out old Jeep) and new gas put in the cans.

              I’m a bit sensitive to fuel related issues with my primary job and have extended that into my small business as well. Been doing this for several years.

              Comment


              • #8
                I think most folks would probably say it's best to drain the tank if it's going to sit for awhile, but I've done the Stabil routine on many of my small engines and I haven't had any major issues. I will say though, as a retired factory maintenance tech, I do periodically take the carbs apart to clean and check them. If you're not familiar with Stabil, check it out and then decide if it'll work for you.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I save the time, effort and hassle by running nothing but ethanol-free "recreational gas" in all of my small engines. I have quite a few small engines and haven't had a carb issue in a decade. Three saws, snow thrower, leaf blower, string trimmer, zero turn, generator/welder, pressure washer...and several more that I've sold.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                    If it sits for 90 days it gets ran through my daily driver (wore out old Jeep) and new gas put in the cans.
                    That's a good idea.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I run them out and dont mess with a lot of other stuff. The crapp you add turns to gunk anyway and its just extra stuff. I use common gas and when I start up try to run the old gas thru. It dissolves stuff slow vs changing with new fuel that cuts varnish so fast it clogs. I dont seem to have more problems than other people and clean a carb on occasion if they sit a lot and need it. Not worth all the hassle.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Cleaning a carb is sop really and once one has been apart its usually a minor deal and can do them and back on in a few minutes. You dont need a "kit" every time a screw is removed. People seem to think bad gas is a new thing. Truth ius gas is now so clean and got such good solvents that we rarely have problems, havnt bought a carb kit in decades, fuel problems used to be a regular occurrence. Gas tanks are now spotless inside, people dont haul fuel in dirty cans anymore, equipment stored inside etc.
                        Last edited by Sberry; 09-23-2021, 06:52 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have found that the gas now does go bad, not like it use to but does to the point it has a hard time igniting. I have used Stabil but still ended up having to boost the gas octane for it too burn properly ( if you use boost it should contain toluene or you are just buying snake oil manganese crap). Also they use plastic for fuel tanks now so no rust out if tank is left only part full as that was always a problem with vehicle fuel tank back in the day.
                          Thank you for the shut off idea. Do you put it after the fuel pump? I have a 1994 ackland tigercat 225g (a rebranded bobcat) I am not sure how the fuel pump is designed, thinking about automotive mechanical they crack if left to dry out.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X