Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

MIG Brazing

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • MIG Brazing

    I've done a little oxy/A brazing over the years on sheet metal lap joints, cast iron (worked surprisingly), other projects, but would not trust it on butt welds (seems like it would be impossible to pull off) or anything structural. I'm seeing more and more automotive manufacturers recommending MIG Brazing w/ Silicon Bronze and (forgive me) would like to open up this discussion item for feedback, discussion.

    My previous work on sheet metal was .025 (4-4.5 / 40 on the Miller 211) and I got more burn thru than I liked. Moved to .023 (slightly lower settings on the 211), but still got some occasional burn thru on old vehicles, but reduced considerably (almost eliminated completely) when I used copper backing plates.

    The MIG brazing seems like it might be an answer to burn thru and the manufacturers are approving it for butt welds. Some of the cars I work on already have plenty of "gold welds / joints" --- guess they used quite a bit of brazing back in the day.

  • #2
    What kind of parts are you talking about joining, non structural flat sheet steel panels? Isn't there a spot welding tool for panel work?

    Comment


    • #3
      One of my steady customers runs one of the largest body shops around here. Several years ago now they added mig brazing to their repair processes. A lot of body shops have funny wire welders, machines made for their industry specifically. I’ve never used one, but he says if you have someone that knows what they’re doing, it’s fast and strong. They get less warping in their body work that they’d have to go back and address and it’s much easier to work the weld bead back down.

      As I understand the mig brazing process, when done correctly, is supposed to braze both sides of the butt joint simultaneously.

      I bought a roll of the wire a while back with the intent to learn it, just haven’t had the time.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by tackit View Post
        What kind of parts are you talking about joining, non structural flat sheet steel panels? Isn't there a spot welding tool for panel work?
        16G - 22G Sheet Metal predominantly and it's typical "cut and butt" type welding -- also some rosette, plug welding but I'm not aware of any reasonably priced spot welders that actually behave like the factory tools --- with the resistance based, "clamping" force those tools use. The hand held spot cutters I've seen (under $2000) don't really do the compressive force like those used by the OEMs.

        I'd love to have something like Craig uses at the Installation Center, just can't justify the cost given my limited work:

        http://theinstallationcenter.com/?fb...BDcZ5w_6yZNdVg

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Auto_Tech View Post

          16G - 22G Sheet Metal predominantly and it's typical "cut and butt" type welding -- also some rosette, plug welding but I'm not aware of any reasonably priced spot welders that actually behave like the factory tools --- with the resistance based, "clamping" force those tools use. The hand held spot cutters I've seen (under $2000) don't really do the compressive force like those used by the OEMs.

          I'd love to have something like Craig uses at the Installation Center, just can't justify the cost given my limited work:

          http://theinstallationcenter.com/?fb...BDcZ5w_6yZNdVg
          Nice shop that's for sure. Takes lots of money to make lots of money a lot of times.

          I bought a electrode holder from Eastwood back in the late 80's as I recall which would magnetically pulse 6013 rods up and down rapidly, as I recall it had an adjustment to how fast it would pulse. It worked, but I never used it enough to become proficient with it.

          Comment


          • #6
            I did lots of mig brazing with my MM185 on sheet metal parts.
            Bob Wright

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post
              I did lots of mig brazing with my MM185 on sheet metal parts.
              And??

              Comment


              • #8
                And I loved it. As long as you weren’t doing a downhill all seams were perfect. Cab corners, floor and trunk pans. Thicker parts not so good. I have seen guys online do cast iron and I didn’t have that luck
                Bob Wright

                Comment


                • #9
                  This a cast iron wheel silicon bronzed to a steel forge project using my MM180, would this be considered Mig brazing? From around 2 o'clock to 12, the wire started to slip.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X