Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Fork Distance Widening

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • BukitCase
    replied
    "Is this job a common ask of welding shops?"

    Not by any that're still in business...

    If doing something for your OWN use (does NOT include any friends or relatives) I'd say it depends on how brave/foolish/desperate/inventive you are -

    If the outfit that asked about this DOES come back, your only SANE answer should be "I'm sorry, but my liability insurance does NOT allow me to make modifications to ANY LIFTING EQUIPMENT"

    In my experience, anybody who says "we won't hold you responsible" very likely has their LAWYER on speed dial... Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • Meltedmetal
    replied
    Originally posted by stickermigtigger View Post
    96” fork width is necessary for 20’ shipping container.

    I looked for used and new adapters. Found one custom built and it looked **** expensive. Was built for a specific customer and no price listed.
    How wide the the fork lift now? Some good points above. If there is a way to do this it isn't going to be cheap or liability free.

    Leave a comment:


  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Actually you shouldn’t modify it without contacting the manufacturer. And they are going to say don’t do it

    Leave a comment:


  • Bushytails
    replied
    Shipping containers could have any random load in any random corner. Trying to use a narrow forklift with widened forks to move one is a recipe for a loud crash followed by someone yelling to call 911...

    Leave a comment:


  • stickermigtigger
    replied
    96” fork width is necessary for 20’ shipping container.

    I looked for used and new adapters. Found one custom built and it looked **** expensive. Was built for a specific customer and no price listed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    Buy used part.

    Leave a comment:


  • Meltedmetal
    replied
    A more complete picture of why they think they need wider fork spacing would be useful to you. There might be better more practical work arounds that could be better. OSHA's guys will have their eyes light up with dollar signs no matter what they end up doing short of the proper machine for the job. Any idea what they are moving? How big the lift is?

    I might consider replacing the existing forks with a properly fabricated and mounted wider attachment that mounts in the same fashion as the forks before I would monkey with the carriage. Even that won't likely get past OSHA and the insurance with out 4 engineers and 17 certifications. Fun, fun.

    Last edited by Meltedmetal; 05-25-2021, 05:45 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • MAC702
    replied
    It's not just the balance, but the entire construction of the carriage to even accommodate one more inch.

    Leave a comment:


  • MMW
    replied
    Liability comes to mind. It all depends how wide they want to go? A few inches probably wouldn't be bad. In response to your question it's probably not a common ask.

    Leave a comment:


  • stickermigtigger
    replied
    “Get a bigger forklift.”

    That crossed my mind too. They said they ‘finally’ bought their forklift. I’m thinking “and you knew before hand what it would be lifting?”

    Leave a comment:


  • tarry99
    replied
    Well without getting into any great detail.........a person with a decent mind for basic engineering just has to look at a carriage and then rationally think about what it does? The carriage is just a large hunk of heavy forged iron machined to accommodate all the lifting accessories ....which normally holds two forks that probably outweigh the person that's looking...........Forklifts operate on a fairly narrow foot print that keeps the weight centered over the hydraulic frame and of course the chassis and wheels below and inherently can have a high center of gravity when in use....offset the weight off the narrow footprint to one side or the other that is not balanced and it wants to go over.........Need a wider carriage? Get a bigger forklift..

    Leave a comment:


  • MAC702
    replied
    Actually, it sounds like an incredible ordeal, and probably not even feasible at all, without even considering the liability and capacity concerns, in that order.

    Leave a comment:


  • stickermigtigger
    started a topic Fork Distance Widening

    Fork Distance Widening

    Got a query asking if I had ever modified a fork lift carriage to allow them to widen the distance between the forks. That’s all they asked. I asked a few questions back but that was the end of it I guess.

    I’m sure there’s more to it than weld on some mild steel but it doesn’t sound like ‘that’ much of a project.

    I’ve never heard of it being done aftermarket but imagine it has a few times. Seemed these folks were stuck on past, direct experience.

    Is this job a common ask of welding shops?
Working...
X