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Toothed blade on chopsaw

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  • Toothed blade on chopsaw

    I was watching a video and saw for the first time a carbide toothed blade cutting steel. 2 questions. 1. When did it become possible to use carbide blades on steel? 2. Is the carbide on a steel cutting blade different or harder than a woodworking blade?

  • #2
    1. 1963...(according to the interweb)
    2. No idea.

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    • #3
      I keep the cut well lubed and have been amazed at how long the blade lasts. I’m a hobbyist, not in production, but the performance and durability is impressive.

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      • #4
        Carbide has been used on various metal lathe and milling machine inserts/cutters/etc since the 1920s, so it's not a new concept. I don't know if the carbide insert material is different than on a woodworking blade but the saws themselves run much slower and the tooth size and count are very different. There are also different blades for thin steel, thick steel, aluminum, etc. You can cut wood with any of them but most leave a rougher edge and take a bigger kerf.

        A while back I bought an Evolution Evosaw S380CPS and love it. Now I only use the bandsaw on really big stuff or harder steels like spring steel, tool steel, etc.

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        • #5
          We cut HSS tool blanks with a Carbide saw
          Bob Wright

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          • #6
            The carbide is not really any different, the profile is what is different for steel. Don’t buy a blade and put it in your abrasive saw though, needs a special saw.

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            • #7
              Although Carbide can be had in many grades........The Good: the exceptional thing about this saw is it's slower blade speed around 1600 rpm's advertised which allows this to glide through ferrous & Non-ferrous materials and still live for thousands of cuts......I have two Fifteen inch EVO 380 saws here.....and after years of service , I have not yet changed a blade in either............Great for compound miters in steel tubing.....can't say enough good except: The Bad: A new 15" blade is around $140 and the chips it spits off are little razor sharp shards that will stick to your shoes and even your fingers........so wear some protection including hearing and be ready to sweep up often or the Mrs. will rip you up if ya bring any of that debris inside!!
              Last edited by tarry99; 04-22-2021, 01:54 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by tarry99 View Post
                ... the chips it spits off are little razor sharp shards that will stick to your shoes and even your fingers....
                And if you are wearing anything fuzzy, you will never be able to get all the shards back out unless you pick them out one by one with tweezers. I threw away an otherwise perfectly good sweater after just a few cuts before I noticed.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tarry99 View Post
                  A new 15" blade is around $140 and the chips it spits off are little razor sharp shards that will stick to your shoes and even your fingers........so wear some protection including hearing and be ready to sweep up often or the Mrs. will rip you up if ya bring any of that debris inside!!
                  Absolutely....they are much louder than folks might realize. Not only are those chips sharp, they're hot and will melt right through many synthetic materials!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by walker View Post
                    The carbide is not really any different, the profile is what is different for steel. Don’t buy a blade and put it in your abrasive saw though, needs a special saw.
                    Yep, needs a slower-speed saw motor (for steel) and a different tooth profile than for wood. You can use woodworking saws and woodworking blades to cut aluminum, but don't try it with steel!

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