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1993 Syncrowave 250 Amperage Adjustment Questions

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Helios View Post
    I've seen reports online from people who use nothing more than paper (no sand). When I've done it with crocus cloth, I've never seen any barnacles, so I'm not sure why a wire wheel is needed. Seems unnecessarily aggressive to me, especially if it "makes no difference before and after."

    YMMV.
    A fine wire wheel is less aggressive than crocus cloth. All a fine wire wheel does to HF points is remove dirt and oxidation....not a mark left anywhere on the points (even the steel parts). You can remove metal with crocus cloth pretty easily...I do it on my lathe regularly. The same isn't true of a wire wheel....you'd be there forever. The iron oxide used on crocus cloth is about a third harder than the steel used on a wire wheel and it's literally millions of sharp edges...no comparison really.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by G-ManBart View Post

      A fine wire wheel is less aggressive than crocus cloth. All a fine wire wheel does to HF points is remove dirt and oxidation....not a mark left anywhere on the points (even the steel parts). You can remove metal with crocus cloth pretty easily...I do it on my lathe regularly. The same isn't true of a wire wheel....you'd be there forever. The iron oxide used on crocus cloth is about a third harder than the steel used on a wire wheel and it's literally millions of sharp edges...no comparison really.
      You want to argue with somebody, argue with the techs and EEs at Miller. Sounds like you know far more about it all than they do. I'm just reporting what they told me.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Helios View Post

        You want to argue with somebody, argue with the techs and EEs at Miller. Sounds like you know far more about it all than they do. I'm just reporting what they told me.
        It's not an argument...just talking facts. Miller's own manual says not to dress the points, so the folks you talked to are already contradicting their own manual by suggesting any sort of abrasive use like sandpaper or crocus cloth.

        The point I was making is that crocus cloth or even extremely fine sandpaper is more aggressive than a fine wire wheel. That was just replying to your statement that a wire wheel seemed overly aggressive....it's simply not. A wire wheel typically won't remove metal, but crocus cloth and sandpaper will. Put a piece of crocus cloth on a piece of steel turning in a lathe and you get metal powder coming off. Do the same with a wire wheel and you won't get metal powder coming off....it's not really in question.

        Lots of folks have said they use abrasives like sandpaper and I don't doubt it's worked out fine for them, but it does disagree with the manual.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by G-ManBart View Post

          It's not an argument...just talking facts. Miller's own manual says not to dress the points, so the folks you talked to are already contradicting their own manual by suggesting any sort of abrasive use like sandpaper or crocus cloth.
          Maybe they want to sell parts, and won't stand behind somebody taking a flogging wire wheel to their points and expecting them to work right. Just a guess.

          "No user-serviceable parts inside."


          Originally posted by G-ManBart View Post
          The point I was making is that crocus cloth or even extremely fine sandpaper is more aggressive than a fine wire wheel. That was just replying to your statement that a wire wheel seemed overly aggressive....it's simply not. A wire wheel typically won't remove metal...
          ANYTHING driven by an electric motor is going to be "more aggressive" than somebody polishing some points by HAND with crocus cloth.

          Example: Cast iron is harder than the hammers of He||, but if you go after it with a wire wheel on an angle grinder, you're going to put a big divot into the casting. You could HAND sand that same cast iron with crocus cloth from now until the end of time, and not be able to put as big a divot into it as you did in 15 seconds with a wire wheel on an angle grinder.

          I'm done with this. Have fun.

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          • #20
            There was still a ton of tungsten left but they were very dirty. Wiping it wasn't enough so I had no choice but to use a bit of high grit sand paper. Put them back in and it works perfect now.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Helios View Post

              ANYTHING driven by an electric motor is going to be "more aggressive" than somebody polishing some points by HAND with crocus cloth.
              I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Brent Bousquet View Post
                There was still a ton of tungsten left but they were very dirty. Wiping it wasn't enough so I had no choice but to use a bit of high grit sand paper. Put them back in and it works perfect now.
                Glad to hear it!

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