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1993 Syncrowave 250 Amperage Adjustment Questions

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  • 1993 Syncrowave 250 Amperage Adjustment Questions

    I was given a Syncrowave 250 for the low price of having to move it out of the building it was in so i couldnt say no. Anyway i think its from 1993 based on the serial number. Ive never used one before and I dont understand how the Amperage Adjustment dial works. It doesnt have any indicator mark on it and it has this second part that also spins and has a small counter on the front. How am i supposed to tell what amps im set too if there is no indicator on the dial? I checked the manual and it doesnt mention it plus the picture shows a different dial.
    Also when I have it set to remote and use a pedal does the pedal span the whole range of the amps the welder can do or is the high just as high as i set the amp knob too?

  • #2
    That's some kind of replacement knob for sure. It should have a typical round knob with an arrow protruding that points to the set amperage. I think the part number has changed, and the style of knob is slightly different, but I'm pretty sure you can still get one from Miller.

    When set to remote the foot pedal gives you a maximum amperage based upon what you have the dial set at. So, if the dial is set at 200 amps, full pedal only gives you 200A.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by G-ManBart View Post
      That's some kind of replacement knob for sure. It should have a typical round knob with an arrow protruding that points to the set amperage. I think the part number has changed, and the style of knob is slightly different, but I'm pretty sure you can still get one from Miller.

      When set to remote the foot pedal gives you a maximum amperage based upon what you have the dial set at. So, if the dial is set at 200 amps, full pedal only gives you 200A.
      thanks thats what i thought but just wanted to be sure

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      • #4
        Mine is newer and has a digital readout, and I've never used one of that vintage, but maybe you could turn the knob counterclockwise until it stops, then use a paint pen to mark the knob where it lines up with zero...? Or does the knob rotate multiple times (with gearing) to go from lowest to highest?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Helios View Post
          Mine is newer and has a digital readout, and I've never used one of that vintage, but maybe you could turn the knob counterclockwise until it stops, then use a paint pen to mark the knob where it lines up with zero...? Or does the knob rotate multiple times (with gearing) to go from lowest to highest?
          The knob only rotates about 270*....from around 7 to 4 on a clock face, turning clockwise. I'd guess the shaft on that is a fairly common size and he could get a replacement knob that would fit from most good hardware places, then mark it the way you suggest. The factory knob looks like it's only about $10, so not bad.

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          • #6
            I didn't think this would be the hold up but I can't get the darn knob off. It's not held on with a grub screw like the others. I took another knob off and saw the shaft is split in the middle for one of those spring clip knobs to work so maybe that's how it's stuck on but no amount of prying has moved it. I may need more drastic measures.

            The knob is weird, the lower section moves the normal amount and I did just set it to zero then put a mark but the second section with the counter spins 360 and the counter only goes up once the lower knob is stopped at its max or min position.

            I just 3D printed a new knob all I have to do is get the old one off now lol

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            • #7
              A 250 that goes to 310 with a custom odometer knob that isn't removable?!? Sounds custom for sure. Have you tried un-threading the knob from itself...might be left hand thread as well. Forum knowledge 100%

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Electric4Life View Post
                A 250 that goes to 310 with a custom odometer knob that isn't removable?!? Sounds custom for sure. Have you tried un-threading the knob from itself...might be left hand thread as well. Forum knowledge 100%
                All Syncrowave 250s go to 310, so at least that part's normal.

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                • #9
                  "A 250 that goes to 310 WITH a custom odometer...thanks for taking 50% of the jelly out of my donut ya stingy *******

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                  • #10
                    I got the knob off finally. I had to take off the outer part then there was a grub screw under that. Its a nice knob apparently made in France. Got the new 3D printed knob on, works perfect.

                    I tried to use the high frequency and after the pre flow was done it would try but the spark gaps would go crazy sparking a bunch but I couldn't get an arc. Think they need to be cleaned?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Brent Bousquet View Post

                      I tried to use the high frequency and after the pre flow was done it would try but the spark gaps would go crazy sparking a bunch but I couldn't get an arc. Think they need to be cleaned?
                      There's a good chance if it's been sitting a while. Pull them out and run them over a wire wheel (they're tungsten and the wire wheel won't hurt them). I set the gap at .010" and have never had an issue with that setting...on 17 different Syncrowave 250s.

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                      • #12
                        I also use .010" gap but I prefer fine grit sandpaper on a hard flat surface using figure eight motions to clean points. Just my .02

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Electric4Life View Post
                          I also use .010" gap but I prefer fine grit sandpaper on a hard flat surface using figure eight motions to clean points. Just my .02
                          +1

                          IIRC, a Miller tech I talked to suggested a max grit size of (IIRC) 400 ... wire wheels and 36-grit angle grinders, not so much.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Helios View Post

                            +1

                            IIRC, a Miller tech I talked to suggested a max grit size of (IIRC) 400 ... wire wheels and 36-grit angle grinders, not so much.
                            I've done many, many, many points on Syncrowaves (17 machines so far) with a wire wheel and it works perfectly. Other than being cleaner, there is no difference before and after. The manual actually says "Replace point if tungsten end dis- appears; do not clean or dress tungsten." so I'm not sure why they would suggest using sand paper of any kind.

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                            • #15
                              I've seen reports online from people who use nothing more than paper (no sand). When I've done it with crocus cloth, I've never seen any barnacles, so I'm not sure why a wire wheel is needed. Seems unnecessarily aggressive to me, especially if it "makes no difference before and after."

                              YMMV.
                              Last edited by Helios; 04-21-2021, 10:37 AM.

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