Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Millermatic 130 XP Regulator

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Millermatic 130 XP Regulator


    Good Morning. New to this forum and MIG welding. My apologies if this question is redundant with previous posts. I have questions about a Millermatic 130 XP that I recently received in trade for some electrical work. Currently, it is loaded with a large spool of Hobart E71T-GS flux core .035 wire. (Stock # S222108-022). I wanted to try some gas welding with solid wire. But it does not have a regulator. Does anyone know what regulator is appropriate? Which Gas shall I try , 100% CO2 or 25/75 Argon/CO2? I have been doing a lot of WEB searching and have downloaded the owners and technical manual. But neither manuals list an appropriate regulator. Any help to get started would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    If you are going to use 75/25 all you need is a flow meter. Any welding supply company will have it. i recommend using 75/25.

    Comment


    • #3
      Welcome!

      For MIG there are two styles of regulator/flow meter available. One style has two round dials with one for tank pressure and the other for flow rate. The other style has a round dial for the tank pressure and a vertical tube with a ball showing flow rate. I think it's almost universally accepted that the vertical ball style are more accurate, but I'm sure somebody out there doesn't like them for some reason or another...you never know.

      Assuming you're going with the vertical tube style there are a lot of options but it mostly falls into inexpensive examples that supply the gas at 50psi to the torch and more expensive examples that supply the gas at 20-30psi to the torch. For MIG welding it doesn't make much difference, but for TIG welding the higher pressure blast when you initiate the arc can be annoying.

      As far as quality goes, even the big names are selling a lot of imported flow meters so if you walk into the local welding shop and buy a Victor flow meter for around $50-70 dollars, it's going to be the same as the other imported flow meters you can find on Amazon or eBay for a lot less. I've bought probably ten of the inexpensive flow meters off Amazon and they work fine, but I did have one with a leak that had to be returned (which was a simple process). For $40 you get the flow meter and the correct hose so you'd be in business. This is the one I've bought:

      https://www.amazon.com/ZISS-Argon-Re...4-3e7a9c0027d0

      If you like nice stuff and want to buy something still made in the U.S., I've been really happy with a couple of Harris 355-2 flow meters on both my MIG and TIG welders. They supply the gas at 20psi so no big blast when you start, which also probably saves a tiny bit of gas over time. The nice thing is you can rebuild them if needed and replacement parts are available. The best price I've seen with a hose is in the $110-115 range.

      https://www.ebay.com/itm/Harris-Argo...Cclp%3A2334524

      As far as which gas goes, it's a tossup. Co2 costs less and will give you better penetration, but you get more spatter and some folks say it takes a little more effort to dial in perfectly. 75/25 is very clean, with little spatter, but a touch less penetration, and costs a bit more. I like having less spatter so I stick to 75/25. Bigger machines can go with less Co2...like 80/20 or 90/10 and do spray transfer for better penetration, but your machine doesn't have the power for that, so no need to consider those blends.

      Long answer for a short question, right?

      Comment


      • #4
        Co2 or 75/25 will work just fine, simply get a flow gauge to match whichever bottle that you get. Chat with your local welding shop about fill prices and tank sizes before you commit. Find a local guy you can buddy up to and have him help you with the set up and some initial pointers, it will save you an incredible amount of time.

        Comment


        • #5
          I use CO2 for steel. It is _much_ cheaper, and works great.

          Any inert gas regulator will work for a basic MIG setup. The ball-in-tube kind is great when you have long hoses and different guns and etc etc, but for a small mig machine, it's not needed. I've found US-made regulators to last longer and work better, but if you just want to see how it works, a chinese one would be fine.

          I'd recommend switching to .023 for solid wire. You may need to adjust, reverse, or replace drive reels for this, and use a smaller contact tip.

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm in the cheap flowgauge camp myself. In fact, a relatively cheap Smith flowgauge is what would come with the machine from Miller. There's just no need for the "accuracy" of the floating ball. You don't need to know your flowrate to the exact CFH, you just need sufficient flow to avoid porosity. There are times when the flowmeter's floating ball's accuracy is desired. MIG welding with a 120V machine and a 10' gun ain't one.

            I use straight CO2 when I can, but this will require a more expensive regulator to avoid the freezing issues. But you'll save money in the long run. Note that the connection to the tank is a different fitting for argon gases and straight CO2. Adapters are available, but they don't solve the freezing that can damage an argon regulator used for straight CO2.

            If you are used to mixed argon, you'll notice a little spatter. If you are used to FCAW, you'll think it's the best thing ever. What little spatter you get is still easily knocked off with your chipping hammer. It's NOTHING like the spatter, slag, and smoke you deal with in FCAW.

            If you are going to do sheet metal (thinner than 16-gauge) I recommend going with the mixed argon route. It's a lot easier to do the thin stuff.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by MAC702 View Post
              I'm in the cheap flowgauge camp myself. In fact, a relatively cheap Smith flowgauge is what would come with the machine from Miller. There's just no need for the "accuracy" of the floating ball. You don't need to know your flowrate to the exact CFH, you just need sufficient flow to avoid porosity. There are times when the flowmeter's floating ball's accuracy is desired. MIG welding with a 120V machine and a 10' gun ain't one.
              If the price is roughly the same, why not go with the floating ball setup? I can't imagine anything being much cheaper than $40 with a hose.

              Comment


              • #8
                Fair point if you shop around. Except for something for straight CO2 usage, I've never had to buy one because enough of my machines have already come with a Smith flowgauge.

                One advantage with the floating ball is that you can't make the mistake of trying to set it without the gas flowing.

                But a major disadvantage is that when they get too close to my antigravity sled, it throws off the reading.
                Last edited by MAC702; 11-19-2020, 05:03 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  And be sure your polarity is set right for your wire process.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X