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Re-Baking 7018 Electrodes

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  • Re-Baking 7018 Electrodes

    So I bought a couple hundred pounds of 7018 electrodes in 50lb open cans cheap. I am learning to weld and am planning on using them for practice welds and running beads. I would like to re-dry them for use on upcoming projects, and my thought was that I could store them in my house until i needed them, and then re-bake. It seems, however, that while small storage ovens are inexpensive, re-bake ovens aren't. The only re-bake oven I have found so far is the Keen KFT-500. Pricey..

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks

  • #2
    A year or so ago I had an issue with some Messer brand 7018 electrodes I bought from Eutectic. After seeking advice from their engineering guys, they were confident that leaving them in a stabilizing oven for 48 hours would return them to as near new condition as possible. I only have small rod ovens too. So provided your rod oven gets good and hot, mine are around 230 degrees I think, that could be a solution for you.

    Your location also has some play in it. If you live in an extremely high humidity area like I do, on the Gulf Coast of Texas, then maybe keep them in the stabilizer a little longer before you plan to use them.

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    • #3
      For what you're describing, it's mostly a waste of time, effort and money. Unless the rods are soaking wet, or the flux is falling off, they're going to work just fine. They wouldn't meet code requirements if you were building a bridge, but that's an entirely different scenario.

      One of the longtime members here did some kind of demo where he left 7018 rods in a can of water overnight, then put one in the stinger, grounded it to the work and waited until it gave off a puff of vapor (water cooked off) and then ran a perfect bead with it. I think he even did bend tests afterwards with no problems.

      About the only thing you might notice different would be that rods from an oven will start a bit easier.

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      • #4
        I let mine set in the sun on a hot day when doing non critical work.

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        • #5
          That was my first thought, too. What's the upcoming project? Just use 'em. If it really matters, there's a guy watching you weld with it, usually.

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          • #6
            I agree with the above posts that it completely depends on your application. If you’re welding on heavy truck trailers, like most of my 7018 use lately, the absorbed moisture should be a concern for you to avoid hydrogen embrittlement or cracking.

            Reminds me, years ago when I sold welding rod after getting out of the army, one of my customers was a state ran bridge maintenance shop. They even had time limits for when the rod had to be used by, after it was taken out of a rod oven, that was dependent on air temp and humidity.

            It’s probably the best practice, but that’s almost always overkill for most applications.

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            • #7
              Thank you for the responses. I have a couple of different businesses, and so I have several projects I'll be working on in the future. One is a flatbed/vacuum waste and fershwater tank for for my portable toilet business. Portable toilet hand truck. Portable toilet trailer. Small gantry frame. All will require reliable welds. I suppose I could could cut open a test bead and see what it looks like, although I would see evidence of a bad electrode on the surface, no?

              Thanks

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              • #8
                Probably a lot of stainless on that vacuum truck huh?

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                • #9
                  No. Was planning on 1/4” mild steel plate.

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