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TENSILWELD vs 70S2

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  • TENSILWELD vs 70S2

    Is this really a viable replacement for 70S-2 when welding chrome-moly???
    LWS claims 70S2 has been discontinued and recommended TENSILWELD.

    https://weldingwire.com/products/Ele...ose/TENSILWELD

  • #2
    Read the link, did not go further than that. Really a vague description. One rod for all metals? Seems like a snake oil. Over the years every so often a magic rod/wire pops up that can weld anything. I would stick to 70S2. Maybe find a new LWS if they can't get 70S2.

    Here is the description if you do not wish to click on the link.

    "Tensileweld is the ultimate AC-DC electrode to use where high strength and porosity-free welds are required. Weld deposits are impact, abrasion, heat and corrosion resistant. Tensileweld is especially formulated to weld dissimilar steels; high carbon, tool and die steels; stainless steels; spring and coil steels; pressure vessels and aircraft steels. It is the perfect electrode to use where the alloy content of the base metal is unknown. Typical applications would include the underlayment of hardfacing alloys in mining applications, rebuilding shafts and agitator blades in turbines, frames, cast steel parts and gears.
    "
    MM250
    Trailblazer 250g
    22a feeder
    Lincoln ac/dc 225
    Victor O/A
    MM200 black face
    Whitney 30 ton hydraulic punch
    Lown 1/8x 36" power roller
    Arco roto-phase model M
    Vectrax 7x12 band saw
    Miller spectrum 875
    30a spoolgun w/wc-24
    Syncrowave 250
    RCCS-14

    Comment


    • #3
      Jody did a video on welding chrome-moly, and talks about er70-2, still a viable option on thin (1/8" or less) wall tubing. Go to his YT channel and do a search for chrome, it was done about a year ago.
      Richard
      West coast of Florida

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      • #4
        Jody? Never heard of her

        Comment


        • #5
          I was trying to give you a link to Jody Collier's website but it apparently offends the censors somehow. Will try something more creative.

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          • #6
            His site is weldingtips& t r i c k s . c o m

            Replace the & with the word "and", and take out all the extra spaces. Excellent site. Be sure to look up Amazin' Blaze there if you haven't seen that video.

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            • #7
              Appreciate the link but I suspect Jody won't have a video on TIG welding Chrome moly racecar chassis with TENSILWELD. If anyone was to do a video I would bet they would use 70S2 or S6.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Electric4Life View Post
                If anyone was to do a video I would bet they would use 70S2 or S6.
                Perhaps that is your answer...

                Richard
                West coast of Florida

                Comment


                • #9
                  ER80-SD2 is what I generally use on race car stuff like tube chassis work, roll cages or wheelie bars. But there’s ain’t a dadgum thing wrong with ER70-S2 or 6.

                  Your local welding supply is trying to up sell you. There are several companies making the same thing. I actually have some in a stick rod form. The stuff actually does an excellent job. But at $35/lbs, I think I’ll save it for something critical.

                  Anyway, it sounds to me like they’re taking a 312 stainless and adding some fancy words to the description to make it sound like it’s new and amazing. Rebadging alloys like that is something maintenance and repair welding alloy companies have done for a long time. Maybe tweak something in the flux a little and call it proprietary.

                  How much is that tensile-whatever-it-is a pound vs er70?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Just to follow up on my original post. The rod in question is most likely what is called a "maintenence" rod/wire. I did not mean to make it sound like it was no good if that is how it came across. They have their places in the industry, especially when a "maintenence guy" has to repair something but has no clue what kind of material it is. He could choose something like tensilweld and be reasonbly sure that he did the best he could under the conditions. However if you know what the material you will be welding is, then you choose the correct rod for that job. Ryan is correct in these type of rods are usually very expensive.

                    After much research I have used 70s2 when tig welding chrome moly tubing on a race car. I have only done it a couple times but I trust what the majority of the industry says in their reccommendations.
                    Last edited by MMW; 07-15-2020, 06:13 AM.
                    MM250
                    Trailblazer 250g
                    22a feeder
                    Lincoln ac/dc 225
                    Victor O/A
                    MM200 black face
                    Whitney 30 ton hydraulic punch
                    Lown 1/8x 36" power roller
                    Arco roto-phase model M
                    Vectrax 7x12 band saw
                    Miller spectrum 875
                    30a spoolgun w/wc-24
                    Syncrowave 250
                    RCCS-14

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I am reluctant to take the word of most LWS's. As for 70S2, its been an offroad industry standard FOREVER but that doesn't mean a rod with higher nickel content wouldn't work, it might come down to cost or it might not share in other characteristics like elongation.

                      Thanks for the input Gentlemen.

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                      • #12
                        As a general rule, I'm annoyed when a product uses a trade name instead of a standard designation that actually tells me what it is. I've no problem with a truly new invention that keeps its formula a secret for as long as possible, but that's not the case here. Just tell me what it is, not what you call it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MAC702 View Post
                          As a general rule, I'm annoyed when a product uses a trade name instead of a standard designation that actually tells me what it is. I've no problem with a truly new invention that keeps its formula a secret for as long as possible, but that's not the case here. Just tell me what it is, not what you call it.
                          I'm inclined to agree with you however if you look in the Washington Alloys downloads and select "Technical Data Sheets" you can find it listed there and it gives a chemical specification. I would assume the unlisted balance is iron.

                          ---Meltedmetal
                          ---Meltedmetal

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                          • #14
                            I'm in the same boat Mac, unless its a proprietary formula tell us what it is. MMW said it like it is, snake oil. IMO, use any "name" to promote the product but just be upfront with the metallurgy.
                            If you're market is hobbyists than re-name it and limit the information but not every fabricatior has an engineer to determine the formula to descifer the application.
                            Washington Alloy has provided exceptional quality in my opinion. Nothing against them, only agreeing with the lack of clarity.

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                            • #15
                              Make sure you use Stargon gas, too.

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