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210 a proven machine to buy used?

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  • 210 a proven machine to buy used?

    Hi, looking at purchasing a 210 used as my first welder. Looks like the last year of production on this model was 2011 and this one looks like one of the newer 210's.
    What should I look out for?
    This will be mostly welding light-medium duty trailer frames where 1/4" would be the thickest material I'd work with and a lot of 1/8" to 1/4" .
    and to clarify this is a 220v machine correct? Thought I read one place it was 3 phase.
    $1000 with tanks
    Thank you

  • #2
    Which 210 are you asking about? Millermatic, Syncrowave, Dynasty....etc.

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    • #3
      Thanks, it's the MM210

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      • #4
        I’d keep shopping at that price. You need to move into the 250, 251, 252 range for welding on trailer frames.

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        • #5
          Yeah, my sentiment exactly price wise. Machine wise, I would have thought the 210 would be plenty for 1/4". Is it because trailers suffer from so much movement?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Greenrig View Post
            Yeah, my sentiment exactly price wise. Machine wise, I would have thought the 210 would be plenty for 1/4". Is it because trailers suffer from so much movement?
            A MM210 will handle 1/4" mild steel, and the parameters chart shows up to 3/8" with solid .035" wire and 75/25 gas, so you'll have enough power. We have a 212 at work (similar specs to a 210) and I've welded enough 1/4" with it to know it worked nicely. The problem could be duty cycle. If you were going to be fabricating trailers and running long beads, as well as bead after bead you might wind up waiting on the machine a lot. If you were to jump up to the 250 class machines that's far less likely to be a problem.

            $1,000 with a tank for a late model (Miller shows 2007 as the last year) isn't all that terrible, but it's not an amazing deal...figure you're getting the machine for something like $750-800 and the rest for the tank. To answer your first question, I think most people would agree the MM210 has a solid reputation.

            I recently had a buddy ask me to find him a nice 250 size machine and I got him a super clean Millermatic Vintage with a Spoolmatic 30A spool gun for $870 at a local auction. It was made in 1989 and had a spool of wire on it which was marked 1998....it's nearly unused, and that model is highly regarded. I've seen several really nice MM251s sell locally for $1300-1500 and that's another very highly regarded model. Deals are out there if you're not in a rush and you can usually look at a machine and tell if it's trashed or not.

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            • #7
              Better off new for that price.

              Comment


              • #8
                Greenrig, I would ask what your intentions are. Are you going to be using this machine in a production environment building trailers, or just building one here and there? I have a MM185 I bought new in 1999 and I've built a couple light duty trailers with it and it performed well doing it. I believe the 210 replaced the 185 at whatever time they came out. If you're going to be doing a lot of trailers, I think a bigger machine would be better. And yeah, you can do better for that price.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Greenrig View Post
                  Yeah, my sentiment exactly price wise. Machine wise, I would have thought the 210 would be plenty for 1/4". Is it because trailers suffer from so much movement?
                  I replied earlier and it got flagged as potential spam....weird. This is what I wrote.

                  A MM210 will handle 1/4" mild steel, and the parameters chart shows up to 3/8" with solid .035" wire and 75/25 gas, so you'll have enough power. We have a 212 at work (similar specs to a 210) and I've welded enough 1/4" with it to know it worked nicely. The problem could be duty cycle. If you were going to be fabricating trailers and running long beads, as well as bead after bead you might wind up waiting on the machine a lot. If you were to jump up to the 250 class machines that's far less likely to be a problem.

                  $1,000 with a tank for a late model (Miller shows 2007 as the last year) isn't all that terrible, but it's not an amazing deal...figure you're getting the machine for something like $750-800 and the rest for the tank. To answer your first question, I think most people would agree the MM210 has a solid reputation.

                  I recently had a buddy ask me to find him a nice 250 size machine and I got him a super clean Millermatic Vintage with a Spoolmatic 30A spool gun for $870 at a local auction. It was made in 1989 and had a spool of wire on it which was marked 1998....it's nearly unused, and that model is highly regarded. I've seen several really nice MM251s sell locally for $1300-1500 and that's another very highly regarded model. Deals are out there if you're not in a rush and you can usually look at a machine and tell if it's trashed or not.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Metjunkie View Post
                    Greenrig, I would ask what your intentions are. Are you going to be using this machine in a production environment building trailers, or just building one here and there? I have a MM185 I bought new in 1999 and I've built a couple light duty trailers with it and it performed well doing it. I believe the 210 replaced the 185 at whatever time they came out. If you're going to be doing a lot of trailers, I think a bigger machine would be better. And yeah, you can do better for that price.
                    My intentions are minimal. I imagine using it only a few times a year. I've been restoring old airstreams and frame issues are common but I only do 2 or 3 a year. Sometimes the frames are fine and sometimes welding whole new one makes sense.
                    Just now learning about limited power here. I knew 220 was possible when I first looked at the electrical service panel with lots of room so I assumed I was good. On second glace I saw the main breaker is only a double 20! It's a sub panel so now I've gotta work it out with the owner and see what he has on his end and see if the wire size is big enough to bump up the breaker size. I get the feeling I won't be able to get a bigger machine and maybe not even the 210

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by G-ManBart View Post

                      I replied earlier and it got flagged as potential spam....weird. This is what I wrote.

                      A MM210 will handle 1/4" mild steel, and the parameters chart shows up to 3/8" with solid .035" wire and 75/25 gas, so you'll have enough power. We have a 212 at work (similar specs to a 210) and I've welded enough 1/4" with it to know it worked nicely. The problem could be duty cycle. If you were going to be fabricating trailers and running long beads, as well as bead after bead you might wind up waiting on the machine a lot. If you were to jump up to the 250 class machines that's far less likely to be a problem.

                      $1,000 with a tank for a late model (Miller shows 2007 as the last year) isn't all that terrible, but it's not an amazing deal...figure you're getting the machine for something like $750-800 and the rest for the tank. To answer your first question, I think most people would agree the MM210 has a solid reputation.

                      I recently had a buddy ask me to find him a nice 250 size machine and I got him a super clean Millermatic Vintage with a Spoolmatic 30A spool gun for $870 at a local auction. It was made in 1989 and had a spool of wire on it which was marked 1998....it's nearly unused, and that model is highly regarded. I've seen several really nice MM251s sell locally for $1300-1500 and that's another very highly regarded model. Deals are out there if you're not in a rush and you can usually look at a machine and tell if it's trashed or not.
                      Thank you for this info. I like vintage and models that are known standouts.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If you have limited power, that greatly reduces your options. Either a small, under powered machine, add available power or use an engine drive.

                        If it’s something you only use a couple times a year then consider farming that work out or renting the equipment you need.

                        Airstreams are cool.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                          If you have limited power, that greatly reduces your options. Either a small, under powered machine, add available power or use an engine drive.

                          If it’s something you only use a couple times a year then consider farming that work out or renting the equipment you need.

                          Airstreams are cool.
                          I've been hiring out for welding stuff for 10 years. I've avoided certain jobs because of this too. Feel like it's really calling me the last few years and that by getting a nice welder itll open some doors.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Looks like we are clear to up the breaker size, so the search continues.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Really the only option, if you’re set on doing your own welding (I don’t blame you there) is to improve your available power capabilities.

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