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Splicing I beam columns

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  • Splicing I beam columns

    I have some pieces of 8" I beam about 7# per ft. , they are 7' and 5' long. I would like to splice by welding to make 12' col.s that I plan to use to make a shed. Anybody got a suggestion. Thanks

  • #2
    Only 8" STRUCTURAL I beam I see on the chart is either 18.4 or 23 lbs/foot; is yours made out of tinfoil, or??!? ... Steve

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    • #3
      What part are you asking for suggestions on? For welding, bevel the edges and weld until it looks nice...

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      • #4
        splice by welding can be tricky. make sure the ground clamp is level with the ground and the electrode is facing north...?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by widetrackman View Post
          I have some pieces of 8" I beam about 7# per ft. , they are 7' and 5' long. I would like to splice by welding to make 12' col.s that I plan to use to make a shed. Anybody got a suggestion. Thanks
          Years ago I saw manufactured homes being set on crawl spaces with I beams spanning the crawl space. Many of the beams had been extended and the guys called them "scabbed" beams. The short version is they put two pieces of beam butted against one another and then welded a flat plate that spanned the joint on both sides. I don't know if they welded the joint before adding the plate or not. For a shed I think something like that would be fine...maybe 1/4" thick plate that goes a foot either side of the joint should do the trick. The plate they used filled pretty much the entire span from top to bottom.

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          • #6
            I was taught to butt the beams, vee out as necessary for penetration depending on thickness, weld, then plate the sides of the web with an elliptical-shaped splice plate. The elliptical shape obviously allows the beam to bend at the weld in the same manner it would if there were no splice. If you use a square or rectangular plate, the stress points are just moved to the ends of the plate, which is little help from a structural viewpoint. I'm sure there were guidelines for the width vs length of the splice plate, and how much of the web it should cover, but that was 50 years ago and the numbers are long gone. I have done a couple, and they are still holding up the building, so it must have worked. For a shed, unless its a really big one, you probably aren't too concerned about major structural issues and you could probably just butt the pieces and weld them.Click image for larger version  Name:	BEAM SPLICE.jpg Views:	0 Size:	21.1 KB ID:	609176
            Last edited by Aeronca41; 06-23-2020, 05:37 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BukitCase View Post
              Only 8" STRUCTURAL I beam I see on the chart is either 18.4 or 23 lbs/foot; is yours made out of tinfoil, or??!? ... Steve

              It’s probably a junior beam.

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              • #8
                I butt welded I-beam for my gantry, fairly heavy for the application too. Keeping it straight will be your biggest problem unless you have a fixture or a way to keep them from warping. On mine, I prepared all planes by beveling them out and left a small land and a gap. I ran 6010 of the open root and capped with 7018. I made these welds in the beam’s final position, so I had flat, uphill and overhead. Ran a string line to keep it flat, level and plumb. I welded a strong back temporarily on the top of the two beams to help hold them together and keep them from twisting up. Your goal is to make them one solid piece of steel again, not just two pieces welded together.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by BukitCase View Post
                  Only 8" STRUCTURAL I beam I see on the chart is either 18.4 or 23 lbs/foot; is yours made out of tinfoil, or??!? ... Steve
                  These are not H beams but light I's . These were scrap left from col's used to build a red iron shed for a friend of mine.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by widetrackman View Post
                    I have some pieces of 8" I beam about 7# per ft. , they are 7' and 5' long. I would like to splice by welding to make 12' col.s that I plan to use to make a shed. Anybody got a suggestion. Thanks
                    Well based on some of you guys comments and my guessing , would 1/4' plate on both sides be necessary and how long. I have some 1/4"x6" plate x 20'? What about? butt beam, weld 1 plate on one side, V out other side and weld. Then V out both flanges and weld, or weld 1/4" plate over joint at flanges? All plates cut to fishplate. What other welding would be needed such as the underside of flanges? No need for overkill as this is a 12' tall 20'x20' tractor shed. What is you guys advise

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                    • #11
                      I say don’t over think it, you’re not building a bridge. As long as you get full penetration there is no reason why a butt weld wouldn’t be just fine. But if you’re still worried about it, butt weld it, grind down the welds and make some fish plates that are twice as long as they are high and weld those on. Or make rectangles and bolt it together.

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                      • #12
                        ^^^^Ryan said it best^^^^

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                        • #13
                          make the joints anything but 90, it will add more weld and a little more drop will be used....
                          sorry about the smart ass reply the other day

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