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Flatten A Table???

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  • #16
    I have dealt with similar problems with a used table I bought, but it's a single piece 4'x8'x1/2". It was from a pre-fab barn company and I guessed that with the plate on the floor, they stitch-welded the frame/legs to the top with MIG and then flipped it upright. The unevenness was easy to understand once you looked underneath at the stitch welds; they were the cause. Except for the ones in the center of the table, I cut the welds out with an angle grinder. Then using heat on the top and jerry-rigged cable come-alongs on each end against a fulcrum in the center to pry up the ends, it straightened pretty well.

    So, without photos of the underside of your table and chalk marks on the top showing high and low spots, it's not possible to say whether that method might work for you. How and where are the 1/2"x8" pieces attached?

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    • #17
      Will get some pics tomorrow
      =======================
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      "The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters"
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      • #18
        Depending on the type of work you will be using the table for would probably dictate what you do. If doing heavy work then a 1/2" table won't stay flat very long so it would not be worth it to straighten in my opinion. If you do light fabricating and layout work then maybe shim the low spots and bolt a 1/4" plate on top using a few countersunk bolts. This way as things change you can always unbolt it and re-shim. Just a thought. If you do need something very flat with holes then sell this one and by a certiflat table like you mentioned.
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        • #19
          So there are about 15 1” racks holding the slats to the frame. Wouldn’t be too difficult to cut them loose and drop a new sheet of 1/2” plate in their stead. Probably the most affordable and quickest solution.
          =======================
          Miller 211 AutoSet
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          Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 42

          "The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters"
          Francisco Goya

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          • #20
            Beads not racks.
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            Miller 211 AutoSet
            Miller Dynasty 200 DX
            Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 42

            "The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters"
            Francisco Goya

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            • #21
              Build a ladder frame with rungs every foot or so, weld the slats to them after clamping.

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              • #22
                I couldn’t afford the 4x8 CertiFlat in this video but I found it interesting and something to note that it’s flatness if relative to the flatness of the floor. The floor is pretty **** flat in this video and still the CertiFlat exhibits some surface variations.


                https://youtu.be/bJVZjhRTEfs
                =======================
                Miller 211 AutoSet
                Miller Dynasty 200 DX
                Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 42

                "The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters"
                Francisco Goya

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                • #23
                  I bought one of those certi-flat kits, assembled it according to the instructions and still got one heck of whoopty-do across the middle. Most likely operator error, but I was still irritated with it. Most of the work I do on it I can compensate though.

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                  • #24

                    An article by BOC on flame straightening.

                    https://www.boconline.ie/en/images/F...674-113398.pdf
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                    • #25
                      I think I’ll cut the slats loose and check the individually, free of any stress. It might be possible the frame and the way they were welded to it is the problem. There wasn’t a lot of effort put in to this thing when it was made. Worse case is I have to drop a new slab on the old frame and I’ll have four nice 1/2” planks to do something with.
                      =======================
                      Miller 211 AutoSet
                      Miller Dynasty 200 DX
                      Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 42

                      "The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters"
                      Francisco Goya

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                      • #26
                        Depending on what your frame looks like consider bolting as opposed to welding them back in place.
                        ---Meltedmetal

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                        • #27
                          Depending on how heavy it is and what you are doing with it, it may not even need to be attached.

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                          • #28
                            I would start over.....That's.a waste of time in my opinion trying to make that flat with all those individual pieces 96" long........I've built many tables and have learned a lot and in the process once again building another , but this time I'm starting with a nice flat piece of plate 48"x 96" by .750 thick... hand picked for flatness.........Now don't get me wrong this will also not be perfectly flat and in order to do so would require having it Blanchard ground which is hardly worth the cost.....for a flat table top you need a hunk of iron that can stay flat by itself and is not dependent on how flat or rigid the frame is below although the flatter the better but over 8 ft it's tough to have a super flat sub-frame........and as far as holes needed for doing jig work only about 25-30 holes split between both ends is all you'll ever need for different fixtures on a 4 x 8 table..........not the 2"on center in the field or 1" from the edge these folks try to sell.......and if you need a few more pull out the magnetic drill and let it rip...My tables all have screw Jacks and phenolic caster wheels and I first level the table, lock down the jacks and then start the build using a precision level from there up and shims if needed............

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