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  • Hello everyone,

    A friend gave me a Lincoln Weldanpower 150. The Kohler engine k241 starts and runs strong. But I can't get any power off the welder. I have cleaned up the item where the brushes sit and disassembled the the rusted wires and Emery cloth the surfaces.
    Unfortunately the prior owner left this Weldanpower out in the weather.
    Any help would be awesome.
    thank you.

  • #2
    Welcome. Obviously not the depth of knowledge of Lincoln machines here as we have for Miller, but will try to help. Please post the model and serial numbers, and I think Lincoln uses something called a "code" number. If you could post a clear pic of the data plate, it would help, as well as some photos of the machine.

    Do you have any idea how long it sat unused without welding? Could be loss of residual field magnetism and just flashing the field will bring it back.

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    • #3
      So what is flashing the field?

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      • #4

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 1960F350 View Post
          So what is flashing the field?
          When you start an engine drive welder a portion of the generator called the exciter produces a small current to "excite" the main generator by passing that current through the brushes to its revolving field winding (the rotor). The exciter relies on residual magnetism to "boot" the exciter. If the welder has sat for a very long time and the residual magnetism has dissipated, and it does not have a diode inside to pass current from the starting battery to the exciter (many old machines didn't), you have to "flash" the exciter field with a battery (which makes sparks at the brushes when you do it, hence the name). Once Started, the exciter will make the current itself. It is this current you control when you select your welding current, by varying the field current in the main generator.

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          • #6
            The photos are not clear enough to be sure I'm reading the numbers correctly. Please post serial and code numbers.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post

              When you start an engine drive welder a portion of the generator called the exciter produces a small current to "excite" the main generator by passing that current through the brushes to its revolving field winding (the rotor). The exciter relies on residual magnetism to "boot" the exciter. If the welder has sat for a very long time and the residual magnetism has dissipated, and it does not have a diode inside to pass current from the starting battery to the exciter (many old machines didn't), you have to "flash" the exciter field with a battery (which makes sparks at the brushes when you do it, hence the name). Once Started, the exciter will make the current itself. It is this current you control when you select your welding current, by varying the field current in the main generator.
              So how one would wake up the exciter?

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              • #8
                Your are absolutely on the right track cleaning up connections after it sat out in the weather. I really suspect a bad connection somewhere is the trouble. Electrically, this is a pretty simple machine inside; not too many things to go wrong.

                Have you worked the amperage switch back and forth across its range a good number of times to clean up its contacts? That could be the problem. Have a look at the contacts and see if they look really dirty, or burned/pitted.

                I was able to find a manual for your machine from the code number, and it has a flashing diode built in, so it should not have to be flashed manually. It does it itself by using power from the engine magneto, which must be working if the engine is running well.

                https://www.lincolnelectric.com/asse...oln3/im287.pdf

                I wondered at first if your machine was old enough that it wouldn't have one, but not true. So, unless it's gone bad, there should be no issue. You can flash the field manually using a battery--I like a 6 volt lantern battery, although many people use a car battery. I prefer the somewhat limited current of the smaller battery first, and if it doesn't work, then try the car battery. I read of a guy who is a generator tech for Caterpillar, servicing huge hundreds-of-kilowatt units, and he says the lantern battery is his preferred method.

                Two keys:

                --the welder must be running, and
                --you touch the wires from the battery in the correct polarity to the wiring connections to the exciter brushes. It is marked on the schematic. Remember schematic diagrams generally bear no physical relationship to the placement of components in the machine, so you have to trace wires to be sure you have the polarity correct if it's not marked, which it often isn't . You just touch the wires for a second--don't hold them on there, especially with the car battery. Just a flash. Wear eye protection--sparks can fly.

                But the first thing I would do is check the connections for the flashing circuit, and use your multimeter to check the flashing diode to be sure it's OK. What is your level of electrical/electronics knowledge?

                Click image for larger version

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