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  • Syncrowave 200?

    I'm still quite sour about my Maxstar 280 failing, in Miller's defense it definitely had a hard life, nonetheless, I am not so sweet on the idea of getting another inverter machine after looking inside that thing.

    My next machine is probably an HTP Invertig 221, not because I think they make a better machine, but because it's affordable, not Chinese, offers great customer service and a 3 year warranty.

    On the other hand, relatively local to me there is a very clean looking Syncrowave 200 for sale, which I can get for $1850. Sync 200 is obviously discontinued, but it's also a transformer machine which in my opinion is a better investment.

    Can anyone here help me make a decision?

    Thanks in advance!

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  • #2
    It has a transformer yes but it also has a group of triacs and a monolithic controller board with no easily available schematics not much different than an inverter machine.

    https://www.millerwelds.com/files/ow...25389x_mil.pdf

    All I'm suggesting is that this welder is one broken part away from scrap too just like the Dynasty. You can buy 2 new Chinese 200 amp welder for the price of this one with more capabilities.

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    • #3
      I have the HTP 221 and that syncrowave 200 you have pictured. The syncrowave is 400 times heavier, does not have near the capabilities of the HTP and takes up a lot of space for only 200 amps. That said, I use my syncrowave all the time. I used it yesterday, in fact, to tig weld and stick weld. I use it so much I just added a coolmate 3 and a water cooled torch to that setup. My biggest complaint about the syncrowave is it’s a power hog. I run both machines off the same 60amp circuit. I can weld all day with the HTP and barely warm up the breaker. It’ll melt down an air cooled torch before it pops the breaker. The syncrowave, full pedal, will heat that breaker up and pop it in about a minute.

      In my opinion, that syncrowave is a little over priced, but that’s for my area. The market might drive a higher price where you’re at, but it will save you some bucks over something new.

      The HTP is an very capable machine. You will not regret picking one up if you go that route. 44 lbs vs 460lbs machine, the HTP is a bad little mammerjammer.

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      • #4
        I had a sync 200, bought and sold for less than that ten years ago. I found it to be under powered for aluminum.

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        • #5
          I agree completely. Especially for how big the machine is.

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          • #6
            Master Kwan makes a good point. Even though the Sync 200 is a transformer machine, the lack of available schematics to support repair of the circuit boards by someone who may be otherwise capable of fixing them devalues these machines greatly. I think Miller could help their position if they would be more willing to support users by making schematics available. I would hasten to add they clearly have every right to handle their intellectual property however they choose, but the fact is quite apparent that the old days of clinging to trade secrets on 10-20 year old machines is almost becoming silly-it is quite obvious other people have figured out how to build very capable welders.

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            • #7
              Totally agree with the above comments by Aero and Master Kwan. I don't think the intellectual property has value beyond a couple years. The more machines I look at, blue or whatever color, follow the same design principles, and the only difference that would account for cost I have seen are the added circuit protections and QC on assembly and components. The prior generation pre-PFC/autoline inverters are all very similar inside, though some use surface mount analog components, some use thru-hole analog components, some use programmable components, and some use a mix. The intellectual property for the latest ones probably mostly lives in software and component/module packaging/design anyways.

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              • #8
                Thanks for the input. Gonna pass on that Sync for sure. The HTP is or repairing my Maxstar are the only options it seems.

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