Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Advice for a beginner

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Advice for a beginner

    Hello everyone,

    I am new and slowly learning to weld. I have read and watched plenty online but am just now starting to do it on my own. I have a Miller Multimatic 215 that I’m using.

    I am using 120 volt power, 75/25 gas, .030 wire, and the auto-set feature on the welder. I’m practicing on some 3/16 flat steel I had in the garage.

    I think my beads may be too convex and have tried moving slower, lowering the wire speed, and upping the voltage but I’m getting the same results no matter what I try. The beads are about a 1/4 inch wide and I would say about 1/8 inch tall (convex).

    Any advice for a beginner?

    Thanks,
    Dave

  • #2
    Too thick of metal for the setting. Have any thinner pcs?...Bob
    Bob Wright

    Comment


    • #3
      Location? Maybe someone has some extra scrap
      Bob Wright

      Comment


      • #4
        I need to make a trip to the scrap yard. I’m in the Virginia Beach area.

        But to you it sound like a welder being out of its comfort issue and not something I’m doing wrong?

        Comment


        • #5
          Thats why i hate auto sets
          Bob Wright

          Comment


          • #6
            I have attached a few pictures of some of my welds on 1/8 inch steel. How do they look?

            A few questions about the welder. When I’m done welding for the day is it best to close the shielding gas valve? And should the torch cable and ground cable be disconnected or can they be safely stored rolled up on the cart while still connected?
            Is it bad for the welder to pull the torch trigger just to extend the wire and not to actually create a weld?

            Comment


            • #7
              You really need 230v to get any good use of that machine. Get some 1/8” metal for your testing. Start by cleaning the mill scale off.

              Sometimes it sounds counter intuitive, but the way in increase or decrease penetration with wire welding on a simple machine like that is to adjust the wire feed speed. It increase penetration (amperage) either increase the WFS or wire diameter. There is a range, too high WFS and it’ll pile up, you’ll feel the wire bumping into the base metal. Increasing the amperage will drive that little arc into the weldment. More heat will give you a faster travel speed too, which will help tremendously.

              Keep a tight stickout. A long stick out will make your weld mound up too.

              I agree with bob, I don’t really like the auto sets either, but it’s a good starting point. Adjust one thing at a time and only a little bit. Figure out a manipulation you like to use, cursive e, u, little Ls, whatever, try them all and see what you like. When you get good results, write the settings down.

              Good luck.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Dbow1 View Post
                I have attached a few pictures of some of my welds on 1/8 inch steel. How do they look?

                A few questions about the welder. When I’m done welding for the day is it best to close the shielding gas valve? And should the torch cable and ground cable be disconnected or can they be safely stored rolled up on the cart while still connected?
                Is it bad for the welder to pull the torch trigger just to extend the wire and not to actually create a weld?
                I am no where near the accomplished weldor many of the folks here are, but I think I can help with these questions.

                --Yes, always a good idea to close the valve on the gas bottle when not welding. If you get the tiniest leak in the solenoid valve or at a hose connection, it will get expensive having the bottle refilled.

                --No reason you can't leave the cables connected, as long as you don't whack them with something and break the connectors on the front of the welder. When I'm not going to be using the welder for a while and set it aside, I usually take them off, just to be safe. However, there's something else to think about here. I always unplug the machine when I'm not using it. More than one welder has been destroyed by a lightning strike, perhaps miles away from your location, that travels down the power lines and induces surges into the machine. Not all that common, but it does happen. Do not assume that just because a switch or breaker is off, the machine is safe. Simply not so. Unplugging the welder is a very cheap and easy way to potentially avoid a large repair bill. Even if there is no immediate impact after a lightning storm, you can have damaged components--the "walking wounded"; the problem may not show up for months or years, and by that time you will have no idea what caused it. Is this a high probability? Probably not. Is it expensive to fix if it happens? Generally, yes. So, why not play it safe?

                I had a case a few years ago with an air conditioning system in a church--four compressor units, four air handlers, all compressors mounted in a row at ground level, all air handlers co-located in the attic, and fed by separate 3-phase breakers from the same panel. One lightning strike nearby--the system was not running. For whatever unexplained reason, one of the four units was down when the storm was over, and we found its controller board failed--no visible damage. Board replaced, system up and running again. Some months later, the same unit failed again--dead contactor in the compressor/condenser unit. Coincidence? Maybe, but all four units were the same age, this was 3-4 years ago, and only that unit has a failed contactor, --before or since. Same unit, about 2 years ago--failed on a very hot and humid Sunday morning during services. Troubleshooting found a bad run capacitor on the condenser fan motor. Fast forward to about a year ago...same unit failed again--bad run capacitor on the air handler fan motor. Another coincidence? I really doubt it. The other three units' run capacitors and contactors are still fine. One of the finest examples of serial "walking wounded" failures I've ever seen. Unplug your welders!

                --No issue with running the wire drive with the trigger. You have to do that when loading new wire, or if you need to cut off the end for some reason. Just remember that it's "hot" when you do that--don't let it hit something that's grounded.

                Comment

                Working...
                X