Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

5 year old Syncrowave 210 worth buying?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    What sort of welding do you plan on doing Joe? Like race car stuff, fixing the lawn mower, etc.

    If you buy the dynasty, you’re buying a machine that has support and a solid history. As for the inverter lasting a lifetime, nobody knows. As of right now, the only lifetime machines are the old transformer machines that still chooch like they did when they were new. For me, the jury is still out on the fancy technology. The capabilities are nice though. I have both and use both just about daily.

    For a small work space, the smaller size footprint the better I say. Plus the power requirements on an inverter will be less.

    For $1300 having a dynasty is cool and all, but does it fit your needs or is it driving a finishing nail with a sledge hammer? That’s my MO, buy bigger and better and hopefully only once.

    Good luck joe. I’m interested to see what you decide.
    ill let you all know what i pull the trigger on.....should be this month

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
      You run across the right Powcon I’m looking for John, you know the type, give me a ring. You seem to see more of them than I do. I’ve only seen them on eBay.
      what are POWCONS?

      Comment


      • #48
        They're DC only inverters, with the main design in the 70's and some updates over time. They have a following, but no one makes or sells parts anymore.

        Comment


        • #49
          And they’re in a rugged fiberglass case with handles making it easily portable, which is what interests me. Plus it’s different.

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by jjohn76 View Post

            I see them every so often. I had never seen a broken Thermal Arc 300 AC/DC until a couple weeks ago and scooped it up. Same with a Lincoln Invertec V350/Power Wave 355. I have seen a lot of XMTs, usually at decent prices ($300 and under). And many POWCONs of all sorts. For the ones I have fixed it's more often a power component (capacitor, rectifier, IGBT) that needs replacement than a board.

            What I have noticed more often is if I fix one and put it up for sale (I always disclose I did the work), I have one or two folks ask me to rebuild theirs. So I think part of it is they're holding on to it in the case they can find a way to repair it cheaply - lots invested.
            been reading the lincoln invertec 205t loses its capability to weld plugged into 220......110 is fine but 220 doesnt work......is that an expensive fix?

            Comment


            • #51
              I haven't seen the inside or schematics of any V205Ts. If it only works on one voltage, that would lead to believe it uses something like Miller's auto-link and the 220V contactor/relay isn't working. It would take some troubleshooting to see why, but I think it would cost much more in time than money to fix. Does it actually weld on one voltage and not the other?

              Edit- I found a post from ccawg on weldingweb. Those Invertec V205's turn on in 230V configuration and if they sense a low voltage (120V input), trigger a relay, which I would suspect creates a voltage doubler circuit. Apparently, sometimes that relay sticks, which puts ~650V across capacitors and IGBTs expecting ~325V if the machine is plugged into 230V. The Millermatic 211 MVP has a somewhat similar relay (it's not an inverter, but reconnects an auxiliary transformer based on input voltage). That could burn up a lot of expensive things, but total cost really depends on what went first, the bus capacitors or the inverter IGBTs. It's a gamble.
              Last edited by jjohn76; 01-25-2020, 11:28 PM.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by jjohn76 View Post
                I haven't seen the inside or schematics of any V205Ts. If it only works on one voltage, that would lead to believe it uses something like Miller's auto-link and the 220V contactor/relay isn't working. It would take some troubleshooting to see why, but I think it would cost much more in time than money to fix. Does it actually weld on one voltage and not the other?

                Edit- I found a post from ccawg on weldingweb. Those Invertec V205's turn on in 230V configuration and if they sense a low voltage (120V input), trigger a relay, which I would suspect creates a voltage doubler circuit. Apparently, sometimes that relay sticks, which puts ~650V across capacitors and IGBTs expecting ~325V if the machine is plugged into 230V. The Millermatic 211 MVP has a somewhat similar relay (it's not an inverter, but reconnects an auxiliary transformer based on input voltage). That could burn up a lot of expensive things, but total cost really depends on what went first, the bus capacitors or the inverter IGBTs. It's a gamble.
                to be honest i found a v205t near me as you might of seen a few comments ago.....the person said he has it setup running on 110v right now, giving me the impression if your not smart enough to realize it that 220v doesnt work.....i havent asked if 220v works which i think i will today and if he gives me the excuse he lost the adapter cord which i think is how it converts from 110 to 220 ill tell him ill get one and see what he says about that.....he also said in the description that he doesnt have tungsten or collets as to steer you away from trying it out tig wise.....he was also asking 1100 dollars for it and i offered him 875 and he didnt even twitch like saying thats too low of an offer or anything.....i dont know how the machine goes from 110 to 220, if its just a matter of a plug adapter or you need to open up the machine and rewire it......i just wanted to know if it was aa easy fix and could talk him down to like 300 bucks barring it isnt able to weld at 220v.....thanks for the info.....

                Comment


                • #53
                  How much are those machines used elsewhere and what comes with it? That price seems high either way. If it doesn't work on 230V though, it won't work on 115V. It would only be an issue if you put it on 230V and the relay is stuck, which is best to try before you buy. I haven't had or seen one, but from what I read after you asked, it's best to dedicate the machine to 230V because that relay has no chance of sticking (it never gets triggered).

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by jjohn76 View Post
                    How much are those machines used elsewhere and what comes with it? That price seems high either way. If it doesn't work on 230V though, it won't work on 115V. It would only be an issue if you put it on 230V and the relay is stuck, which is best to try before you buy. I haven't had or seen one, but from what I read after you asked, it's best to dedicate the machine to 230V because that relay has no chance of sticking (it never gets triggered).
                    i looked them up and they go for 1800 dollars now new,,,,,,when they first came out they were 3 grand......lincoln doesnt make it anymore......thanks for the info.....so the relay is only used to bring it down to 110v.....thats good info to know......i havent asked him yet if it works on 220v......ill do it now and let you know

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X