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5 year old Syncrowave 210 worth buying?

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  • 5 year old Syncrowave 210 worth buying?

    hello....was wondering if a 5 year old syncrowave 210 is worth buying for 1300 dollars.....it had repairs done when first bought but has been running great ever since so the owner says.....he bought an everlast to replace it recently and wants it gone....he showed me the repair slips from 5 years ago but they just say diagnosed and repaired on them.....he also sent me pics of pieces welded by the machine which look good

  • #2
    Originally posted by joetig View Post
    ........he also sent me pics of pieces welded by the machine which look good
    Are you going to have to buy it based on pics and have it shipped, or are you able to go test it yourself? Are you experienced enough to know what it can do so you can test all parts of it?

    I'm leery of anyone that replaced a Miller Syncrowave with an Everlast. Something doesn't add up there.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by MAC702 View Post



      I'm leery of anyone that replaced a Miller Syncrowave with an Everlast. Something doesn't add up there.
      I agree with Mac. I have a 20 yr. old MM185, bought new, that still works great. No reason to replace it with a new one. And if you can't check it out in person, if it were me, I'd pass.

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      • #4
        im going to go try it......i should ask what model everlast he bought

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        • #5
          The only reason, I'd swap the 210 for an Everlast would be if I needed a lighter package. The 210 is > 130 lbs though so, maybe they needed a light machine to lug around. Still, you can get an Everlast with water cooler pretty cheap compared to this machine.

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          • #6
            yeah i was thinking maybe he bought the everlast because it has more options than the miller.....but your suggestions sound good too....

            i was just wondering really if the syncrowave 210 is any good at 5 years old, like is it ready to burn out a pc board or something....or is it a good life time machine to use on weekends.....its going to sit in my garage and never leave unless someone rips it off but good luck with that my garage is booby trapped with hidden alarms

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            • #7
              its a tough call.....i was looking for a welder and i have a 1300 dollar budget and this thing pops up on fb marketplace......and who doesnt want a miller

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MAC702 View Post

                Are you going to have to buy it based on pics and have it shipped, or are you able to go test it yourself? Are you experienced enough to know what it can do so you can test all parts of it?

                I'm leery of anyone that replaced a Miller Syncrowave with an Everlast. Something doesn't add up there.
                any suggestions to whats a good ac/dc machine with a 1300 dollar budget?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hey Joe,
                  My Sync was made in '99. It's a 250. Dont be deterred by the age.
                  I've used an Everlast before. They are an inverter machine. I assume that's probably why dude got it. IMO.
                  Hope for the best prepare for the worst.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by joetig View Post
                    its a tough call.....i was looking for a welder and i have a 1300 dollar budget and this thing pops up on fb marketplace......and who doesnt want a miller
                    You can buy a brand new AHP-201XD for $720 with 3 year warranty. I'd get the Everlast for about that same price. If I welded for a living, I'd get miller. As a hobbyist, I see no reason to go crazy on a machine. I used to own a Dynasty 200 and the AHP is just as good for the kind of welding I do. I'd love to have another Dynasty but it costs 4-5 times as much.

                    They are an inverter machine. I assume that's probably why dude got it. IMO.
                    The 210 seems to be a pure inverter machine too. No transformer according to the schematics.

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                    • #11
                      What sort of welding do you plan on doing Joe? Like race car stuff, fixing the lawn mower, etc.

                      If you buy the dynasty, you’re buying a machine that has support and a solid history. As for the inverter lasting a lifetime, nobody knows. As of right now, the only lifetime machines are the old transformer machines that still chooch like they did when they were new. For me, the jury is still out on the fancy technology. The capabilities are nice though. I have both and use both just about daily.

                      For a small work space, the smaller size footprint the better I say. Plus the power requirements on an inverter will be less.

                      For $1300 having a dynasty is cool and all, but does it fit your needs or is it driving a finishing nail with a sledge hammer? That’s my MO, buy bigger and better and hopefully only once.

                      Good luck joe. I’m interested to see what you decide.

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                      • #12


                        Good luck joe. I’m interested to see what you decide.[/QUOTE]

                        ive been shopping around......the eastwood 200 digital ac/dc sounds good......i was planning on just making stuff for myself like a trailer rack off a hitch to carry rubbish barrels to the dump and workout equipment instead of going to the gym make my own setup just for my needs....maybe make a ratrod someday and i need a mailbox stand....a couple of welding carts.....i also want to do finite stuff like r/c truck frames.....the whole gambit i guess......im just wondering if buying the used miller would be better than buying a new eastwood machine......

                        if someone came on here and said the syncrowave 210 is a piece of crap and keep away from them they are always breaking like they seem to have said 5 years ago on forums about the machine or once you get the bugs straightened out of them they are good to go thats what kind of answers i was looking for

                        it would really hurt if i buy a used miller and it craps out on me.....means i would have to save up another 3 years for a new machine.....but from what i read here and on other forums everything is a crap shoot unless its a transformer model.....but i like the fact inverters will keep my electric bill down

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                        • #13
                          Joe, if you're experienced, pass on the 210. I used one daily for the past year or so. Pulse adjustment is limited to PPS. There's little to no adjustment for AC.
                          It's a great machine for a beginner for sure and at 1300, its priced for a beginner as well.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Electric4Life View Post
                            Joe, if you're experienced, pass on the 210. I used one daily for the past year or so. Pulse adjustment is limited to PPS. There's little to no adjustment for AC.
                            It's a great machine for a beginner for sure and at 1300, its priced for a beginner as well.
                            yeah 1300 is the used price...its a 2600 dollar machine, no experience really, tig carbon steel only.....did it ever break down on ya?.....and i can get an update for ac frequency.....isnt PPS enough.....do you really need all that amplitude to do welds?

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                            • #15
                              If you’re planning to weld with high or low speed pulse, no, PPS adjustment only is not enough. You need to be able to adjust the pulse on time and the back ground current to take full advantage of that setting. Other wise you can just pulse with the foot pedal. It’s not the same, but it’s close.

                              Any machine you buy used is a risk, inverter or transformer. It’s like an old truck vs a new truck. The new computerized transmission can leave you stranded, but so can an old manual tranny. One is a little more low-level-skilled-guy like me friendly, but there’s always the chance. With that in mind, ALL of my equipment except one inverter machine and my plasma cutter I got used. I have had to work on two of them, but they’re all good now.

                              I don’t like Eastwood, everlast, longevity or a few others, but honestly I only have negative experience with longevity (it’s junk and the service is awful). The rest are just based on stories I’ve heard from people I like.

                              I currently use miller, Lincoln and HTP machines just about daily and my setup works for me. I won’t hold it against you, or anyone, if you buy an everlast. I just hope it works out for you.

                              Be patient Joe, the right machine will pop up.

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