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  • Amps and volts

    Specifically regarding stick welding, I'd like to hear thoughts on this question. A 110 volt inverter DC stickwelder capable of max 120amps vs a 220 volt DC stick welder both set to weld at 100 amps .... Do the machines individual input voltages have any appreciable effect on the weld given the same parent mild steel aside from perhaps duty cycle?

  • #2
    The differences in arc characteristics will be from things other than input voltage.

    While the duty cycle will surely be less on the 120V machine, that's because it's probably a physically smaller machine, also.

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    • #3
      One specific thought is penetration of course which I feel is far more dependent on purely the welding amperage regardless of the machines input voltage, but on the other hand is all that extra voltage all that extra potential energy push just sitting there in reserve or in fact does the 220 volts help push that 100 amps out? Guess a good test may be the same machine with dual voltage capability, then a cut and etch. I just hate going through all that if somebody knows the answer.

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      • #4
        I think for that experiment to be accurate you’d need to make sure you were basically on the same volt/amp curve with your weld settings.

        But it would seem to me, by just dissecting the definitions, that it’s merely easier for the 230v machine to make the welding current of the same rating as a 115v machine. I’m probably missing something in my thought string though. We used to have some really sharp guys that checked in on here often, hadn’t seen them around in a good long time now.

        I’m interested to see your experiment.

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        • #5
          As others have said it will have more to do with the output characteristics of the machine(s) in the two tests. If for example on 220v input the output volts are 70v and on the 120v input test is done at 55v out both at 100 amps the lower voltage test will not see the same heat as the higher voltage test. So you need to check the output volts as well as the input volts to compare.

          ---Meltedmetal
          ---Meltedmetal

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          • #6
            This is the kind of thing that I'm curious about. Is there some kind of a generic voltage output per amperage based on 110 or 220 if so obviously the higher voltage output at a given amperage would mean not only better penetration but also crispr art starts. I just don't know if there is some kind of a generic chart that explains at 100 amps and 220 volts this is your output voltage and at 110 volts and 100 amps this is your output voltage in those are just carved in stone relations across the board for all different manufacturers? I have no idea how I would test the output voltage while I was welding something other than putting a voltmeter across the dinse connectors and having someone look at it.

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            • #7
              Every welding machine manual I’ve ever seen has a volt/amp curve chart. Check yours, you’ll see it. It certainly makes more sense when you see it graphed out, I’m with you there.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                ...We used to have some really sharp guys that checked in on here often, hadn’t seen them around in a good long time now....
                I think I'm offended!

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                • #9
                  Ha! Don’t be brother. You know the guys I’m talking about, you’re another one of the good ones holding on through tough times. Fortunately our know-nothings aren’t participating either.

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                  • #10
                    I've noticed that more folks have been starting threads and posting responses, since a certain faction has seemingly disappeared. Very refreshing!

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                    • #11
                      Your not going to get 120 amps out of a 120v machine. I suppose anythings possible if it had enough input amperage but I imagine what your refering to is the machines that plug into a standard outlet. I have one little machine like that and it maxes out at like 85 amps stick and 95 amps tig. The reason for the extra amps on tig is that the tig arc need less voltage. On stick I can burn a 3/32 7018 rod bit its on the cold side. Its also really hard to get it started and likes to stick a lot. It will also not run a 6010 rod. The reason for that is they are trying to push as much amperage as possible by scimping on the voltage. Its really does not have enough voltage for stick welding. So lets say a weld done with this machine and a proper machine using 3/32 7018 would they be as strong? Depends. The proper machine would certainly make it a lot easier. I certainly wouldnt want to use the 110v machine on some pressure pipe but it could probably be done if you ground out all your starts as they would likely be to cold or have perosity. Hopefully that answers your question lol
                      www.silvercreekwelding.com

                      Miller Trailblazer 325 efi
                      Miller extreme 12vs
                      Thermal arc 186 ac/dc
                      Lincoln power wave 455m/stt with 10m dual feeder

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                      • #12
                        My little maxstar 150 STH is dual voltage and the best it will do on 115v a 3/32 7018, but it actually does good on that rod. It’s also only 100amps max on the lower voltage. That would probably be a good machine for an experiment like this. Turn the amperage down to 100 when it’s plugged into 230v and fire away.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Slagslapper View Post
                          This is the kind of thing that I'm curious about. Is there some kind of a generic voltage output per amperage based on 110 or 220 if so obviously the higher voltage output at a given amperage would mean not only better penetration but also crispr art starts. I just don't know if there is some kind of a generic chart that explains at 100 amps and 220 volts this is your output voltage and at 110 volts and 100 amps this is your output voltage in those are just carved in stone relations across the board for all different manufacturers? I have no idea how I would test the output voltage while I was welding something other than putting a voltmeter across the dinse connectors and having someone look at it.
                          Yes you can do that with a volt meter and you can also put a clamp on amp meter around a lead if you want to know the true amperage. Its not so much the 110v input that is the limiting factor as much as the actual wattage you can pull on a 15 or even 20 amp circuit. A 30 amp 240v circuit is going to have 4 times the amount of wattage available. As I said in the previous post the manufactuers of these little 110v machines are sacrificing the output voltage in order to squeze as much amperage as possible. As a result they often wont run a 6010 or even a 7018 properly
                          www.silvercreekwelding.com

                          Miller Trailblazer 325 efi
                          Miller extreme 12vs
                          Thermal arc 186 ac/dc
                          Lincoln power wave 455m/stt with 10m dual feeder

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                            Ha! Don’t be brother. You know the guys I’m talking about, you’re another one of the good ones holding on through tough times. Fortunately our know-nothings aren’t participating either.
                            It also seems that those who think they know something are still moving lips and offering gibberish. Try and stay on task.

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                            • #15
                              Thanks all for the input!

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