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350P Contact-to-Work Distance on 1/8" steel; 0.035 wire; 90/10; 250 ipm

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I know exactly what you mean with the tweco gun. I took a few real thin strands of wire and laid them in the threads of that insulator, helped snug it up so it stopped playing its little game.

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  • Willvis
    replied
    Looks good but maybe travel a bit quicker, your weld is bigger then it needs to be. Are you just practicing though? because there is no real reason to run pulse on 1/8. The main reason to run pulse would be to weld thicker (1/4" plus) material out of position. Pulse lets you maintain a spray transfer while lowering the overall heat input. It basically allows the puddle that split second to freeze a bit so it doesn't droop on you when your doing put of position welds

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  • AlphaBob
    replied
    Had some modest success today thanks to all the good comments! Practicing on 2" square 11 gauge tube and probably my biggest challenges during the earlier [less successful] attempts were: (1) The Tweco Classic No 4 Gun has a screw-on insulator that supports the nozzle - it was unscrewed about half way which made the nozzle very floppy; (2) my CTWD was way too close so the machine effectively goes into short circuit transfer and generally makes a mess; and probably caused my burn back; the Lincoln Procedures were very helpful (I'm using the same wire as tackit), and (3) wire speed was too low.

    Minor clarification and I probably did a poor job describing my situation - I've been welding for a while, just never got particularly good - what we used to call a farmer / welder when I was a kid - they don't come apart, but they ain't pretty. Pulse is what is entirely new to me and I am having trouble getting good information on pulse on steel. Discovering pulse on steel has been like the scene in the movie The Jerk when Steve Martin hears the blues and discovers his rhythm!

    I've got a ways to go before I can produce welds like this consistently, but its a start! Thanks again! As always comments, criticism, and suggestions are welcome.
    Last edited by AlphaBob; 12-14-2019, 07:39 PM.

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  • Willvis
    replied
    That's a fair bit of welder for someone new to welding. A bit like learning to drive with a Ferrari. Anyways the pulse program is synergic so if your bead is too tall, lacks fusion, etc you probably just need to turn up the wire feed speed a bit. Its not likely you need to play with the trim or whatever millers word for that is (the voltage), what that will do is adjust your arc length but shouldn't change the bead too much. I only really use mine on aluminum but 90% of the time I leave it on the factory setting and its good. There's time that I will turn the trim way down if I want to really drive the wire into the puddle but thats about it.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I’ve been rather impressed with the pulse technology to be honest. Even pulse stick welding is impressive. As has been said before, it’s not magic but in the right application, man it’s dadgum nice. The next wire machine I buy will definitely have pulse capability.

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  • MasterKwan
    replied
    I was going to leave this topic alone because of the walls of relatively unrelated text. I will suggest that treating pulse like spray is a mistake. While the beads look the same, pulse is really a unique process that only vaguely maps to spray.

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  • tackit
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Tack, you are correct.

    MasterKwan, you are spot on with the pulse mig as understand the operation as well.

    AlphaBob, increase your WFS and practice. Pulse mig is an incredibly versatile process.
    Thanks Ryan, I'm like a country bumpkin lawyer, I get things right by keeping things simple and letting MIT experts dwell on things I don't need to know and that put my mind in a fog.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Tack, you are correct.

    MasterKwan, you are spot on with the pulse mig as understand the operation as well.

    AlphaBob, increase your WFS and practice. Pulse mig is an incredibly versatile process.

    Leave a comment:


  • Noel
    replied
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNRBSUNvFEs

    You want to know what stubs my electrode. I watch these video's of people with all the high tech and higher education but who seemingly fail to apply it in a manor that's of value to the viewer. This video is an example of that.

    That was produced, shot...at the U of A here in Edmonton.

    Cool as it is, looking at the irregularity of droplet formation, droplet transfer, somethings out of sorts.
    While it's quite a visual display, it's an example of CTWD being over extended, or other parameters being out of wack. Does it matter, no. But it could be adjusted and tweaked to be done better, yielding more uniform droplet formation and a more consistent transfer.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drCSLgfvY8I

    Around 5 minutes things are dialing in. Note the setting.
    While I would describe his technique in forward progression as jerking the dog off not walking it along, as he mentions, the arc becomes needle like.

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  • tackit
    replied
    Originally posted by Noel View Post
    Lol. Really... or are you just saying that?

    From Lincoln:



    This is part and parcel to the problem. Probably buddies problem by the sounds of it. He's gone past the range required. Now, let's assume he bobs in and out a bit, doesn't support the gun well in technique (who knows? ) and while the machine is set and will make rapid changes, all it takes is a variation and parameters change further as I mentioned with in and out or weld profile changes for that matter. Doing a fillet and weaving across the middle to the sides as an example. We don't know. Maybe the pre set was for 1/4" plate and he's using a 1/4" plate, but his is on a table acting as a heat sink and the factory did theirs in free air on a smaller piece being welded? We don't know. I got 6" but depending on the angle viewed it looks longer.

    And the thing with a longer stick out, at some point no matter what those setting are, the shielding gas still has to provide an environment with gas coverage for those transfers to occur.

    What holds true however is the basics of the process. Guys see that spray transfer occurs between X volts and x volts, x WFS and x WFS yet fail to account for the process variables of wire size, type, material, joint design and CTWD. The latter and longer would mean a change to those parameters for such to occur.

    Lastly from Lincoln:



    Not of all it was BS you know. Not to say it was brilliance either but...it was something.

    The highlighted, those cathode forces...those are over come by reducing voltage, increasing WFS, or lengthening stick out. All with limits attached of course.





    Perhaps Miller can come put with a nozzel that has a guide wheel to keep the torch at the proper distance from the work, and gold contact tips for those weldors who want the most electrical + and - thingies traveling down the wire and through the shielding gas money can buy?

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  • Noel
    replied
    Lol. Really... or are you just saying that?

    From Lincoln:

    For most of the diameters of filler metal alloys, the change to axial spray transfer takes place at the globular to spray transition current. A stream of fine metal droplets that travel axially from the end of the electrode characterizes the axial spray mode of metal transfer.
    This is part and parcel to the problem. Probably buddies problem by the sounds of it. He's gone past the range required. Now, let's assume he bobs in and out a bit, doesn't support the gun well in technique (who knows? ) and while the machine is set and will make rapid changes, all it takes is a variation and parameters change further as I mentioned with in and out or weld profile changes for that matter. Doing a fillet and weaving across the middle to the sides as an example. We don't know. Maybe the pre set was for 1/4" plate and he's using a 1/4" plate, but his is on a table acting as a heat sink and the factory did theirs in free air on a smaller piece being welded? We don't know. I got 6" but depending on the angle viewed it looks longer.

    And the thing with a longer stick out, at some point no matter what those setting are, the shielding gas still has to provide an environment with gas coverage for those transfers to occur.

    What holds true however is the basics of the process. Guys see that spray transfer occurs between X volts and x volts, x WFS and x WFS yet fail to account for the process variables of wire size, type, material, joint design and CTWD. The latter and longer would mean a change to those parameters for such to occur.

    Lastly from Lincoln:

    During the use of all metal-cored or solid wire electrodes for GMAW, there is a transition where short-circuiting transfer ends and globular transfer begins. Globular transfer characteristically gives the appearance of large irregularly shaped molten droplets that are larger than the diameter of the electrode. The irregularly shaped molten droplets do not follow an axial detachment from the electrode, instead they can fall out of the path of the weld or move towards the contact tip. Cathode jet forces, that move upwards from the work-piece, are responsible for the irregular shape and the upward spinning motion of the molten droplets.
    Not of all it was BS you know. Not to say it was brilliance either but...it was something.

    The highlighted, those cathode forces...those are over come by reducing voltage, increasing WFS, or lengthening stick out. All with limits attached of course.






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  • tackit
    replied
    I see.

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  • Noel
    replied
    When we talk Constant Current and SMAW the idea of Amperage being adjusted as a value equating to "heat" is what we associate when turning the dial up or down. If we thought of that not as heat, but volume of electrons, little amps if you will think so, then we have more or less of them.
    This of course is based around the principle of electron travel, those +/- values and which terminal the greater number of electrons are traveling from or too.
    Voltage then would be the variable. Raising the rods end further away or closer to the surface would change voltage because the distance the electrons have to travel is diminished with a close arc, or increased due to a long arc.
    I should bring in a mention of volt/amps curves to such change in arc length but I won't. I will say though that the longer arc length scatters a greater percentage of those electrons and that typically is shown as a wider, wetter deposit of metal. It doesn't occur though without a loss of electrons, heat, or is it amperage?
    Now accounting for the idea the SMAW electrode is a consumable, to be used up, as it shortens, the rod appears to burn hotter. The reason is, less resistance in the rods length from the electrode holder,(point of contact) to the end of the rod. Longer to shorter stick out assuming the length of the tip of the rod is held consistently for arc length.
    Back to GMAW.


    differences in wire to work distances within the machine's designed range shouldn't change chosen voltage settings that much or at all? Am I not understanding correctly? Thanks
    Your understanding it correctly just I'm not being clear enough in my explanation.
    These "new" invertor based machines do some wonderful things to compensate and correct for us, our mistakes. I can't argue that. What I can discuss is what is still occurring.
    When you set voltage on a CV machine, even the old ones, it should hold fast, there shouldn't be any variance far past holding steady +/- 1 volt? So what's voltage? A pressure or force moving electrons. Pushing cattle thru the chute.
    So for the sake of discussion, if the machine was not of the abilities to self correct operator inconsistencies, and to a limited degree even if it was, variations to stick out will add more or less still from proximity and further in time due to a number of variables.
    Longer the chute, the longer it takes to load cattle. You got a corral
    (Contact tip)
    a cowboy ( Voltage) trying to move cattle ( AMPS) and he may get them in the chute (Wire size) but the longer the chute the slower the lead cattle move. Resistance.
    With the length of chute or wire size, it's the volume of cattle that can be moved at one time.
    We were talking GMAW-P, the change in two values. Like the SMAW rod melting shorter and appearing hotter, if it isn't lowered what are the effects? if we look at the process aside from the upper and lower transitioning range, is it so far fetched to think turning voltage up or down is much different than thinking hotter or colder? It isn't, but it appears almost so. It's not like the WFS is going faster or slower, but it when adjusted adds more or less, yet amperage is changing they say?
    Food for thought... Regardless of voltage, if the wire speed is slowed down, arc length increases. Sped up it decreases. That is a noticeable attribute to stick out changes as well. Since your not adding more or less wire, it becomes in effect, hotter colder, or seen maybe as a similar effect to/as more voltage or less voltage. What is happening however, is those cattle will not just leave the chute on there own, so when the cowboy zaps them with the prod, a group of them jump out, a large droplet. Spray transfer is nothing more the a narrower chute and more cowboys with prods to move them faster nd singular in file.


    Synergic power sources.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z7xWYmVd3EA
    I don't know if I answered your question Tact? But I tried to offer an explanation for it. Dazzle them with brilliance or baffle them with BS.

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  • MasterKwan
    replied
    Increase voltage,
    I'm not aware of any pulse MIG machines that aren't "synergic" or whatever the manufacturer term is for automatic voltage setting. Typically you tell the welder what the wire thickness is, you pick a feed rate based on the material being welded, change the arc-length to control where in the air the wire melts and that's about it for settings. The machine picks voltage and pulse parameters based on the wire speed and thickness. The pulse rate changes with wire speed. The frequency goes up as the wire speed goes up.


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  • tackit
    replied
    Noel, I thought because Mig machines are constant voltage welding machines, differences in wire to work distances within the machine's designed range shouldn't change chosen voltage settings that much or at all? Am I not understanding correctly? Thanks
    Last edited by tackit; 12-11-2019, 03:31 PM.

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