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  • Home made gun rest

    I couldn't find a gun rest that I liked so I built my own. I bought the Army type black stockholder and the leather forearm bag.

  • #2
    Prototyped is the word yer looking for Tack.

    TACKtickle Prototypes for the Shooting World. You design it we build it..
    Be a real seller over on Gunbroker.com where all the retired cubicle dwellers lament their inability to build.

    BUT

    You gotta offer it in John Deere green and AC Prairie Gold and CIH red.

    Comment


    • #3
      Looks good tack
      Richard
      West coast of Florida

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      • #4
        Looks great
        Bob Wright

        Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
        http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

        Comment


        • #5
          Don't encourage Tack. He'll be on gun sites saying Endorsed by Richard & Bob if you encourage him.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Ltbadd View Post
            Looks good tack
            Thanks LtBadd.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post
              Looks great
              Thanks Bob.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Franz© View Post
                Don't encourage Tack. He'll be on gun sites saying Endorsed by Richard & Bob if you encourage him.
                Hey, it's cost-effective and does a great job. To take the slop out of the 1" althread, I used three nuts, one on top to lock the screw in place, and two hidden inside the square tube frame. The hidden top nut was welded to the top plate and the second nut was tightened just enough to take the slop out of the rod, then it was given a small tack to hold its place. The 1" rod turns through both bottom nuts so smoothly it feels like I used a precision lead screw and nut.
                Last edited by tackit; 12-03-2019, 07:58 PM.

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                • #9
                  Nylock Tack.
                  If you can't find them drill into one flat of the nut, tack a ¼-20 nut over the hole and after it cools insert a short hunk of PVC or even Poly rod thru the nut on the flat. Insert a setscrew behind the plastic rod to compress it against the threaded rod and you have variable resistance against turning the threaded rod. Call it Option 3.7 and charge 23 bucks extra after you paint it IH red. The red makes it easy to find when its dropped.

                  I like PVC rod best for the application.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Franz© View Post
                    Nylock Tack.
                    If you can't find them drill into one flat of the nut, tack a ¼-20 nut over the hole and after it cools insert a short hunk of PVC or even Poly rod thru the nut on the flat. Insert a setscrew behind the plastic rod to compress it against the threaded rod and you have variable resistance against turning the threaded rod. Call it Option 3.7 and charge 23 bucks extra after you paint it IH red. The red makes it easy to find when its dropped.

                    I like PVC rod best for the application.
                    I like the PVc idea. I have used brass before instead of the PVC before. What I did is drop a piece of brass brazing rod down the hole and put the set screw against it, got the idea from set screws that come with brass tips.

                    The problem I see doing it your way is, the set screwed nut will move away from the upper welded on nut when the althread is lowered, and is stopped by the moving nut when the allthread is turned in the upward direction, no? Without the nut being anchored to the top nut, it will move, losing any ability to remove the thread slop. Thanks for reminding me of the idea though, I forget things..
                    Last edited by tackit; 12-03-2019, 11:21 PM.

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                    • #11
                      It's sort of like when some kid tells somebody that man forgot more than you'll ever know about whatever. Hopefully I ain't forgot too much yet cause what I forgot don't do anybody a bit of good.
                      Lot of hospital equipment uses the plastic tipped screws to lock in place with knobs on the screws too. You sit and screw with it and scratch the nuts you'll come up with an idea. Make sure you got full nuts too, not the fin nuts that are the same size as a bolt head. No meat to those at all.

                      You can get brass, aluminum and bronze rod in 3/16 diameter. I use a lot of it with 1/8 pipe for hinges and it works better than the Coleman barrels I ran out of.
                      If you run a leather or rubber washer between the nuts will it help keep the nuts together?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Franz© View Post
                        It's sort of like when some kid tells somebody that man forgot more than you'll ever know about whatever. Hopefully I ain't forgot too much yet cause what I forgot don't do anybody a bit of good.
                        Lot of hospital equipment uses the plastic tipped screws to lock in place with knobs on the screws too. You sit and screw with it and scratch the nuts you'll come up with an idea. Make sure you got full nuts too, not the fin nuts that are the same size as a bolt head. No meat to those at all.

                        You can get brass, aluminum and bronze rod in 3/16 diameter. I use a lot of it with 1/8 pipe for hinges and it works better than the Coleman barrels I ran out of.
                        If you run a leather or rubber washer between the nuts will it help keep the nuts together?
                        I have days when I can hardly remember my kids names, it gets frustrating running through all their names to come up with the right one. Putting things away in places so I won't forget them has cost me many a wasted dollar too.

                        Using Coelman barrels for hinges I can't get in my mind wrapped around.

                        Leather washers I don't think would work unless perhaps very small up and down movements were made.

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                        • #13
                          Coleman air rifles were made here. Most machining was done on piecework basis in basement shops to minimize employee costs. Thousands of barrel blanks went out & came back. Coleman's main costs were cutting blanks and inspecting completed barrels.

                          I was able to get a few hundred barrels that were either rejects or whatever for a dime a barrel.
                          10¢ for a ½ diameter steel tube with a .177 bore about 16" long is hard to pass even if you got no immediate need.

                          Hinge is easy to weld on and keep aligned in 1 piece rather than 3. Precut into 3 pieces leaving a feather uncut so the assembly rmains together. Insert rod for best alignment & TACKK in place. It really helps to remember which sections weld to which sides of the hinged assembly.
                          Rotate rod to check alignment. Employ Zip wheel to remove feathers - complete weld. Easy hinge every time.
                          Final step after cooling, pull pin back and insert small plastic or brass washers into cuts for hinge bearings.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Franz© View Post
                            Coleman air rifles were made here. Most machining was done on piecework basis in basement shops to minimize employee costs. Thousands of barrel blanks went out & came back. Coleman's main costs were cutting blanks and inspecting completed barrels.

                            I was able to get a few hundred barrels that were either rejects or whatever for a dime a barrel.
                            10¢ for a ½ diameter steel tube with a .177 bore about 16" long is hard to pass even if you got no immediate need.

                            Hinge is easy to weld on and keep aligned in 1 piece rather than 3. Precut into 3 pieces leaving a feather uncut so the assembly rmains together. Insert rod for best alignment & TACKK in place. It really helps to remember which sections weld to which sides of the hinged assembly.
                            Rotate rod to check alignment. Employ Zip wheel to remove feathers - complete weld. Easy hinge every time.
                            Final step after cooling, pull pin back and insert small plastic or brass washers into cuts for hinge bearings.
                            Now I understand the Coleman connection now, it sounds like a good way to make a hinge. I did something similar with 1/2" black pipe, a 9/16 bolt, and a piece of 3" square tubing with one side removed for a 10'? gate's hinges.
                            Last edited by tackit; 12-04-2019, 05:22 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Franz© View Post
                              Coleman air rifles were made here.
                              Coleman or Crosman?
                              Bob Wright

                              Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
                              http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

                              Comment

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