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  • #31
    I'm in the same boat as you on an SA200 - budget's gotten too anemic to pay for one that actually WORKS (altho if Franz was closer, I might be tempted :=), and I unequivocably do NOT need another project of ANY kind between now and "pat in face with shovel" time -

    I haven't run a 210 MP, but don't remember EVER seeing a BAD review - I'm guessing by now you're aware that nearly ALL multiprocess machines are a compromise, some more than others. Still, option #2 would give you choices, even on your fence project - several different stick options (probably one of the fast freeze rods) or flux core.
    TIG on that machine sounds like it's a version of scratch start, so probably no razor blade welds or jewelry repairs - and it's DC tig, so no Aluminum or Magnesium tig UNLESS you wanna keep a bottle of HELIUM around (guess where "heli-arc" got its name) - those limitations are NOT exclusive to Lincoln, Miller, etc, it's just metallurgy/physics.

    You still could do basic aluminum with that machine, just add a spool gun (or keep your MIG torch REALLY straight :=) ... Steve
    Last edited by BukitCase; 11-06-2019, 05:19 PM.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Franz© View Post
      Well, before you learn to weld pipe, you gotta learn to cut pipe and fit pipe, so that gives you a while to ponder on machines..

      Hey, you can even go purist and gas weld the fence, and really cook off money.

      Machine prices are very regional. I have a SA 200 sitting in the yard with a complete engine rebuild and 10 hours on the engine, and in this area it won't sell for $1000-
      Watching plastic gas line getting drilled in all over this area, NO Welding involved.
      Well franz you crack me up. What I wouldn’t do to sit down and have a beer with ya and listen to the experiences you’ve had. No sarcasm intended, I mean that! Very true on cutting pipe. Going to have each 30 cut down and pound those lengths in. So before welding time, I have to learn to pound pipe for sure! Then notching / grinding / fitting / welding. I have a feeling I’ll get the hang of it after about 10 hours of cursing and mistakes!

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      • #33
        Originally posted by BukitCase View Post
        I'm in the same boat as you on an SA200 - budget's gotten too anemic to pay for one that actually WORKS (altho if Franz was closer, I might be tempted :=), and I unequivocably do NOT need another project of ANY kind between now and "pat in face with shovel" time -

        I haven't run a 210 MP, but don't remember EVER seeing a BAD review - I'm guessing by now you're aware that nearly ALL multiprocess machines are a compromise, some more than others. Still, option #2 would give you choices, even on your fence project - several different stick options (probably one of the fast freeze rods) or flux core.
        TIG on that machine sounds like it's a version of scratch start, so probably no razor blade welds or jewelry repairs - and it's DC tig, so no Aluminum or Magnesium tig UNLESS you wanna keep a bottle of HELIUM around (guess where "heli-arc" got its name) - those limitations are NOT exclusive to Lincoln, Miller, etc, it's just metallurgy/physics.

        You still could do basic aluminum with that machine, just add a spool gun (or keep your MIG torch REALLY straight :=) ... Steve
        That sa 200 sounds quite appealing he has sitting there doesn’t it! I’m with ya. Yes a compromise for sure. I think the only tig I see in my future is to make a frame around a large built in fire pit. It doesn’t conduct heat as bad as steel so hopefully less burns on our guests. The granite cracked with the extreme heat!
        I like tha Lincoln’s mig and stick reviews (clearly no experience with it or anything for that matter)

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        • #34
          If you're gonna pound all your posts in, here's another thing to toss in the budget -
          https://www.rohrermfg.com/?gclid=EAI...SAAEgLARvD_BwE

          I have the 2=7/8" version, added the T post adapter AND a 2" square adapter (if I'd known, I woulda just made my OWN adapters (except for the T post, that'd be kinda tricky)

          With the 2" square adapter, I then built an adapter (heavy capped 2" square tube, welded to a heavy capped 6" piece of 4x4x3/16" wall tube - pencil-pointed PT 4x4's and soaked the cuts in penta - in my heavy clay soil (NOT mid-summer :=) I drove those 4x4's 3' deep in about a minute each. T posts take about 25 seconds. Built another adapter (1-1/2" x 10" piece of pipe, "shim" from 1/4" FB, drilled couple holes, welded a 1/2/20 nut over one, slide that into the 2" adapter, tighten the "wing bolt", and drove 1-1/4 EMT in on the same pattern as a couple of Costco 10x20 "garages" - slid the garage pipes OVER the conduits, assembled in place, stands up to the 60-80 mph winds on our hill.

          If you're gonna drive your posts in FIRST, might wanna reconsider a Plasma with a template rather than killin' yourself coping 'em the hard way. also, when I drive stuff like that I always bevel the OUTSIDE of the driven end - otherwise you're tryin' to COMPRESS the INNER soil inside the pipe - dunno how MUCH trying to compress the soil IN the pipe makes it harder to pound, but it's GOTTA be SOME... Steve

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Cityslickergonecountry View Post

            Well franz you crack me up. What I wouldn’t do to sit down and have a beer with ya and listen to the experiences you’ve had. No sarcasm intended, I mean that! Very true on cutting pipe. Going to have each 30 cut down and pound those lengths in. So before welding time, I have to learn to pound pipe for sure! Then notching / grinding / fitting / welding. I have a feeling I’ll get the hang of it after about 10 hours of cursing and mistakes!
            Problem #1, I worked in a beer foundry in 66-67. I know too many things about the beer foundry to drink beer.

            OK, s what ya know about pounding posts? Anybody in the hood with a power pounder?

            Or are you going to make your own drop pounder out of a hunk of pipe and a slug? If making your own I'll strongly advocate making it deadblow for more delivered energy per stroke.
            Anybody ever spain to you how a pipe can only be driven so far before friction of soil against pipe stops more motion?

            KERAPP, game plan just changed, he needs a welder to make the post driver.

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            • #36
              I got my hands on a pneumatic post driver at a pawn shop for $50. It was money well spent. I later adapted it to split fire wood, but I honestly prefer the splitting wedge and a hammer.

              If there was an SA200 in good shape nearby for $1k, I’d be all over that thing.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by BukitCase View Post
                If you're gonna pound all your posts in, here's another thing to toss in the budget -
                https://www.rohrermfg.com/?gclid=EAI...SAAEgLARvD_BwE

                I have the 2=7/8" version, added the T post adapter AND a 2" square adapter (if I'd known, I woulda just made my OWN adapters (except for the T post, that'd be kinda tricky)

                With the 2" square adapter, I then built an adapter (heavy capped 2" square tube, welded to a heavy capped 6" piece of 4x4x3/16" wall tube - pencil-pointed PT 4x4's and soaked the cuts in penta - in my heavy clay soil (NOT mid-summer :=) I drove those 4x4's 3' deep in about a minute each. T posts take about 25 seconds. Built another adapter (1-1/2" x 10" piece of pipe, "shim" from 1/4" FB, drilled couple holes, welded a 1/2/20 nut over one, slide that into the 2" adapter, tighten the "wing bolt", and drove 1-1/4 EMT in on the same pattern as a couple of Costco 10x20 "garages" - slid the garage pipes OVER the conduits, assembled in place, stands up to the 60-80 mph winds on our hill.

                If you're gonna drive your posts in FIRST, might wanna reconsider a Plasma with a template rather than killin' yourself coping 'em the hard way. also, when I drive stuff like that I always bevel the OUTSIDE of the driven end - otherwise you're tryin' to COMPRESS the INNER soil inside the pipe - dunno how MUCH trying to compress the soil IN the pipe makes it harder to pound, but it's GOTTA be SOME... Steve
                there is a guy that’ll come with his skiddy and pound em in for 6 bucks a post. That adds up pretty darn quick. I called my favorite local rental company and they have both gas and air post drivers. Once again, no experience, however the videos on you tube about them make me believe it’s managaeable. Figuring to rent one for a weekend. If it’s manageable, continue on. If it’s ****, I’ll call the post driver fella

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Franz© View Post

                  Problem #1, I worked in a beer foundry in 66-67. I know too many things about the beer foundry to drink beer.

                  OK, s what ya know about pounding posts? Anybody in the hood with a power pounder?

                  Or are you going to make your own drop pounder out of a hunk of pipe and a slug? If making your own I'll strongly advocate making it deadblow for more delivered energy per stroke.
                  Anybody ever spain to you how a pipe can only be driven so far before friction of soil against pipe stops more motion?

                  KERAPP, game plan just changed, he needs a welder to make the post driver.
                  Everyone round these parts drives em in. Rarely augered and cement. Somewhat sandy top soil and moderate clay base below. Hopefully it all pencils out.
                  And more importantly: You won’t drink beer because you worked in a beer maker place. Okay.....I’m calling you out on that one. Or i feel bad for ya. Beers yummy man!

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                    I got my hands on a pneumatic post driver at a pawn shop for $50. It was money well spent. I later adapted it to split fire wood, but I honestly prefer the splitting wedge and a hammer.

                    If there was an SA200 in good shape nearby for $1k, I’d be all over that thing.
                    I’m thinking same thing on that sa200: Franz where ya at? I can ship that thing if it’s a good running welder. I’m seriously interested.

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                    • #40
                      Machine needs a battery and magneto touchup to run. Rebuilt the engine and put less than 10 hours on her when the game changed to either dragging 400 feet of cable to get destroyed by forklifts or run a propane machine inside the building. Lincoln got corked up and parked in the barn. Came out of the barn stayed corked up, and gets the MMO down the sparkplug treatment every year.
                      Got a genuine LinKoon running gear under it with mismatched wheels and tires. I wouldn't tow it far on that miserable running gear though. Tires are probably rotted too.

                      Location Zip 14468 Hilton, NY.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Cityslickergonecountry View Post


                        And more importantly: You won’t drink beer because you worked in a beer maker place. Okay.....I’m calling you out on that one. Or i feel bad for ya. Beers yummy man!
                        My lengthy career in beer began when I was about 10 and read how to make homemade rootbeer with yeast, water, sugar and flavoring. Few years later I'm in what was a cross between a penal colony and high school, and I got 3 75 gallon plastic drums under te auditorium fermenting beer. Building engineers generously provided me with a new hose in exchange for self service beer, and I'll tell you assemblys were quite entertaining considering 75% of the teachers were alcys. Beer aroma came up from the domed vent under every seat. 5¢ got your 16 ounce milk carton filled with beer and 900 of the 1300 male students always had a milk carton in their hand. I made enough money to pay for my first pickup, and was happy. Few years later I tell the boss to mail my check and drive off into the sunrise till I find a diner I like and sit there drinking coffee and reading help wanted ads in the paper.

                        Right there is an add for Electrician/ industrial, Genesee Brewing. Hey, it was inside work, and the winter of 65 had been colder than a witche's ###,
                        I drive over, walk in and ask for an application. Fellow comes over to talk to me with 2 beers in his hand and offers me a beer to begin the job interview.
                        I figure I'm screwed cause at the time I wasn't drinking, not even Skotch, and certainly not beer.
                        Long story cut short, 3 hours later I'm hired and headed to Police Headquarters to be fingerprinted.

                        Beer at the interview was nothing. Every shop, Electric, Plumbing, Truck Garage, Millwrights, Bottle House Mechanics all had coolers, full of beer, usually unpasturized and there were taps in the walls and cafeteria with stacks of 16 ounce paper cups. Adventure in employment to keep you from thinking about exploding bottles flinging glass, and leaking caustic trying to dissolve you. OSHA was still years in the future.
                        Only rules, 3rd time you get busted pissin on the wall or floor you get time off, and NO Beer leaves Brewery property unless it's hauled by a truck, and that does not mean a pallet of beer in your bud's pickup.

                        You get killed they'll have an ad in the paper before you're embalmed. You get hurt, you might have a job when you heal up. Welcome to the wild West.

                        Being just smart enough to know I can learn a lot here, and having a lot to learn, to say nothing of WARM in Winter, and BlueCross coverage, I keep my head down and safety glasses on. My boss is into sprint car racing, and when he finds out I''m #2 Track Electrician for Watkins Glen He loves me. I ask can I leave early Friday, he tells me he'll punch me in and out on the clock, no problem. He sees Maryann's picture in my toolbox sitting in a Cobra with Carole Shelby putting a sales pitch on her, I own the shop. Company has a STRICT Policy, no tours of the foundry. OK, Thursday half a dozen track crew get the escorted tour from the Electric Foreman and Plumbing Foreman. Maryann did look good in the black silk jacket with COBRA Cobra cobra Powered by Ford and her name embroidered on it.

                        That end of the job was good. Along came Glass cans. Job got a lot more dangerous with those things fragging all day. Forklifts all driven by Krauts who think they are driving Panzers on assault mean you're a target. One comes up the ramp one day, flips making a turn and launched the driver into the empty barrel conveyor, half mile long chain with a 50 horse motor. Firemen show up and can't get enough slack to pull him out so they want to torch the chain. I hear that and I want to be in the next county. We got the man out in 10 minutes by reversing the motor, and he wraps a rag around his ankle to go back to work. What's the code for my time card for getting Kraut out of conveyor? Month later 5 idiots get a bath of liquid caustic doing a halfazzed job with no safety. Then 2 of them near get scalded because the cleaners almost hosed them down with steam hoses.
                        Oh yea. It's warm in winter, but how long you survive is a factor of how good is your luck.

                        Plant engineer designed a gantry on wheels to do a job and made it too big to get thru the door without cutting apart. Rebuilt it and stuck his mitt between the A frame and beam. He fainted, somebody put a bundle of paper towels under his smashed mitt to absorb the blood and somebody else called an ambulance. He wasn't well liked.

                        New product called Fife & Drum, dark premium beer. Every shop wanted all they could get. OK, I'm early man, I get orders direct from Fritz, haul in all you can get. I had too much Fyfe, unpasturized, so Plumbers and Millwrights had to haul some to their shop. 2 days later management is crawling all over the line from filler to packaging looking for missing green bottles. Nobody is talking.

                        You think beer is yummy, I ain't telling you what that man tending the copper kettle does.

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                        • #42
                          Just an update. Told a few friends what I was planning on, then one calls me and saw on Facebook marketplace a 1200 hour single owner meticulous 2012 ranger 305g with a trailer for 2800 bucks. Went and saw it, brought it home today for 2500.
                          I feel comfortable with the deal and it’s in impeccable shape. Please don’t ask if it welds however, because no frickin clue

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                          • #43
                            New from Indiana Oxygen it's a $6000 machine, so price sounds good. Capable of both stick & wire so now all you need is a suitcase and you can fence all day every day. OK, some practice time too.

                            Can we ask if it runs and makes all 10000 watts of electricity for those Califooledya power shutdowns?

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                            • #44
                              It run like a champ. Will be amazing for the ca shutdowns for sure. We lose water also due to being on a well. The only way we can flush during outages is going to the gravity fed fire line and getting buckets to fill the back of the tanks. So yes, will be a massive improvement during outages.
                              I believe the 2012 has 10,500 peak and 9500 continuos. I believe that’s right, not positive though.
                              I will say this beast is loud however. I’m sure it would upset some neighbors if used for camping

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                              • #45
                                Couple preloaded 275 gallon poly caged tanks solves the water problem. Been flushing off a cistern for years in this house to save well consumption, and if you ever see rain out there you can collect roof water too. If you have the Koler pressure flushers a camper pump will get you there.

                                3600 rpm machines are naturally LOUD. Using it for power pipe the exhaust into a 3 foot wide 4 foot deep hole i the ground with a cover and exhaust pipe from the hole. Then you only hear the air flow.

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