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  • Threshold ramp

    I need to make a threshold ramp for my wheelchair that is 2 3/4 inches wide, 5/8 high and 36"long, it works out to be about 170 degrees when drawn on my table top, is there a way I can cut the 10-degree angle on a jigsaw or table saw with a jig? I can't think of how to build a jig that would work..

  • #2
    You tryig to build something like this?
    https://www.amazon.com/Prairie-View-...SIN=B0009QWATY

    Seems to me coming down the back side would be hard on the shair with the drop

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    • #3
      Poke "wheelchair threshold ramp" into the search block at Walmart.com. They got em there cheaper tan you can make one.






      even fetch it to your nearby Wally free.

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      • #4
        It might be easier to do it with a wood plane or planer or shaper. You could also bend a piece of .125 flat bar in you hydraulic press or weld a couple of pieces of flat together.

        ---Meltedmetal
        ---Meltedmetal

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        • #5
          Just tack the piece you want to cut to a piece of plywood at the angle you want it cut, then run the plywood along the fence.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Franz© View Post
            Poke "wheelchair threshold ramp" into the search block at Walmart.com. They got em there cheaper tan you can make one.






            even fetch it to your nearby Wally free.
            Thanks, I went there and seen a design I think I can make. I have a stack of .090 thick aluminum sheets with a pre-bent flange that may just work.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Meltedmetal View Post
              It might be easier to do it with a wood plane or planer or shaper. You could also bend a piece of .125 flat bar in you hydraulic press or weld a couple of pieces of flat together.

              ---Meltedmetal
              I thought of doing the 1/8 flat bar thing, but because it's going to live outside and I wanted to make it out of pressure-treated lumber so rust wouldn't be a problem, thanks for commenting melted metal.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by walker View Post
                Just tack the piece you want to cut to a piece of plywood at the angle you want it cut, then run the plywood along the fence.
                Thanks walker for the idea, If my aluminum idea doesn't work out I'm going to do it your way. and finish it off with a plane like Meltedmetal suggested. If I could do the work I wouldn't have any problem, but I have to be able to translate my idea to the SIL and I don't always make myself clear. what should seem simple and easy to make comes out a lot different than what I ask for. ..

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                • #9
                  If you make it out of wood (AND the SIL can be trusted around DANGEROUS tools) it shouldn't be too difficult to set the blade angle 10 degrees off of square and RIP a piece. Rip fence nearly touching the blade (on whichever side of the blade that tilts AWAY from the fence), a couple of sacrificial push sticks (beats losing fingers) - unless your saw is one of those marginal portables, that is - my PM66 would take maybe 5 minutes including setup... Steve

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                  • #10
                    Here's the way it came out, . after taking Franz suggestion, I went to Walmart and saw a ramp that looked like I had the materiel to build one like it. I have a stack of .090 X 33" wide X 29" deep ? aluminum pieces out in the shop that have a small bent flange on one long side, you can see the brake line at the top of the new aluminum ramp where it meets the aluminum threshold... the angle was perfect for what I needed, the new ramp is 6" wide. It required a 3" dutchman on the hinge side of the storm door for the new bottom slide on door weather seal to make a seal.all the way across the door.

                    Underneath the new ramp is a 3/8 thick X 1/2" wide X 36" long wooden riser strip needed to match the elevation of the threshold. I need to buy silicone caulking and then I can call this job done.
                    Last edited by tackit; 10-11-2019, 12:08 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BukitCase View Post
                      If you make it out of wood (AND the SIL can be trusted around DANGEROUS tools) it shouldn't be too difficult to set the blade angle 10 degrees off of square and RIP a piece. Rip fence nearly touching the blade (on whichever side of the blade that tilts AWAY from the fence), a couple of sacrificial push sticks (beats losing fingers) - unless your saw is one of those marginal portables, that is - my PM66 would take maybe 5 minutes including setup... Steve
                      Thanks for the info BukitCase. Wouldn't I need a jig or two fences so the work could lay on one fence while cutting the 36" long piece of work?
                      Last edited by tackit; 10-11-2019, 11:59 AM.

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                      • #12
                        I always enjoy borrowing product engineering and building a better product.

                        Might I suggest a coat of bedliner on the ramp before weather gets cold? I hate thinking of you spinning your wheels on slick aluminum.

                        Will we be movingahead to doorjam nerfs next to keep your knuckles attached?

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                        • #13
                          "Thanks for the info BukitCase. Wouldn't I need a jig or two fences so the work could lay on one fence while cutting the 36" long piece of work?"

                          Nope - but that wuz when you were still talkin' about a 2-3/4" wide ramp; for that, I would start with maybe 6" or wider piece by whatever your door width was, TILT the blade 10 degrees (move the fence to whichever side your blade tilts AWAY from, adjust the RIP fence as close to the blade as you can, then hold the piece against the RIP fence (NOT the miter fence), then when you run the piece thru the blade it should REMOVE a piece that's almost what you want - it would LEAVE an edge on the 6"+ wide piece that has your angle on it - then you would RIP that angled part off, and that would've been your ramp.

                          Obviously you got a more gradual ramp by going wider, but my method wouldn't work for that UNLESS you had an "old arn" saw with a 16" blade - a 10" would be lucky to make a 3" deep cut.

                          BTW, NONE of my method would work very well unless you have jigs to mount finger boards to the rip fence BEFORE and AFTER the blade, so THOSE can maintain good contact between the board and the fence WITHOUT the added advantage of NOT needing to trim as many fingernails as before :=(

                          The GOOD news - looks like you found a better way - also, if you like the "industrial" look I used this
                          https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
                          when I built a 3'x10' work platform to use on the loader of my Case backhoe - A bit flashy for a front door, but definitely works... Steve

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                          • #14
                            And the really good part, since the grumpy old RR employee posted a picture of his chair rerailer he has no excuse for not being in the shop knocking out work.

                            Get on it Tack!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Franz© View Post
                              I always enjoy borrowing product engineering and building a better product.

                              Might I suggest a coat of bedliner on the ramp before weather gets cold? I hate thinking of you spinning your wheels on slick aluminum.

                              Will we be movingahead to doorjam nerfs next to keep your knuckles attached?
                              That's a great idea Franz, I think I have a spray can of Bedliner in the shop. Knuckles so far have not been a problem, but it does require a bit of lining up the chair because of the door closer getting in the way. Next week I'm going to move the closer to the top of the door.

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