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  • Franz©
    replied
    I remember 2 things aboot knitting.
    There are machines thatwill do most of it while a jack rod moves the bobbin back and forth.
    Second, getting busted attempting to teach the Lab to hold the skein of yarn so Mom could wind it onto a ball was a very bad idea on my part. When that pup went tug of war on her yarn badness came forth from that lady in huge portions.

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  • Noel
    replied
    Originally posted by Franz© View Post
    I opine that all the verbosity and drawings don't mean spit till the joint is cut, polished, developed and looked at. Pretty tops might mean something to somebody, but if the weldments ain't fused to create strength the crap on top ain't gonna help.

    Neil I am chagrined with the 1234 Canadian approach. Surely I'd have thought a country known for its woolens would have held firm to knit one pearl 2 for long passes.
    Noel learned 1234 and never learned to knit. I do wish I had, I like knitted socks, mitts, scarfs and sweaters. Winters are long, and yarn seems to be readily available. I see a bright side to the seniors lodge?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lW2gIJARpXA

    Voltage is like salt, to much isn't really a good thing, but that doesn't however stop people from using it in excess. As you mentioned, it's because they don't cut and etch, they see smooth and don't see much more or further past what's on top.

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ID:	603531I poached this picture from a publication. The whole side of the left face is flat, as well the corner being a sharp corner. Not for me to say, but looking at the picture, I bet I can stand a good chance of winning on a guess which side he was standing when he welded it and where the gun was pointing when he did. I'd also guess voltage was on the higher side when doing so.
    But it would be just a guess.

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  • One1
    replied
    Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post
    INWELD is great rod and wire. I sold a ton of it...Bob
    That’s where I’m heading for my next roll. I’ve had such success with the 6010 i gotta try the 030. If it’s as good as the rods I’ll never buy anything else.

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  • Franz©
    replied
    I opine that all the verbosity and drawings don't mean spit till the joint is cut, polished, developed and looked at. Pretty tops might mean something to somebody, but if the weldments ain't fused to create strength the crap on top ain't gonna help.

    Neil I am chagrined with the 1234 Canadian approach. Surely I'd have thought a country known for its woolens would have held firm to knit one pearl 2 for long passes.

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  • Noel
    replied
    Some guys have a natural knack for thinking...I'm not that guy. But from time to time I actually do think.
    I'm thinking I'll go to look at the threads in my sewing machine and see if they are a right lay, left lay, Lang lay or just how they lay? Most likely just covered in dust is my guess?

    Yup, covered in dust.

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ID:	603497 What I don't get is that they say do this or do that motion, this step or that step, but they don't mention the rest that goes with it like why you do it or when too use it.
    Hotter, tighter arc and moving faster is the way to smoothing out the bead with better blending. That's my take on it.

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ID:	603498 But it's also amperage, arc length and voltage force, puddle viscosity with the pause for melting, motion to spread, and steps to set the freezing and filling. This based on wire type, slag system if applicable, joint design, welding process and of course the skill and understanding of the guy doing.

    Besides that, a hot more fluid puddle hides the lack of rhythm most of us are known for with a tighter finer ripple that doesn't stand out as much as a course weld profile tends to do.


    1234,1234,1234...One, two, three, four. One, two, three, four. One, two, three, four. Big difference. Just like a sewing stitch.

    But I as previously mentioned, I wouldn't have weaved it in like that. I like to think my replies have leaned towards a soft correction to what is a poor welding practice or habit to break. Especially in a horizontal position. Failing that, how to improve what apparently is going to be done anyways.

    Could be I'm off the mark so I have to ask, how many of you would have performed that weld in just that fashion? Or do I stand alone once again in my opinion?






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  • Franz©
    replied
    Noel are you using left twist welding thread or right?

    I recall Bob was always demanding aboot using left on Singers.

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  • Noel
    replied
    What's that they say about third time being the charm? A guy getting lucky, or skillful?

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    Or my flogging a dead horse? " I think I can fix it if I beat it a bit longer"?

    You know, when you get this, and it applies to all types of welding, your welds will be smoother and blended better as a result. That includes SMAW and using the 6010. Third times the charm or lucky. The fourth says skillful.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I’ve been running esab solid wire but am considering changing to selectarc since I like their dual shield so much, probably give a roll of that stuff a try.

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  • aametalmaster
    replied
    INWELD is great rod and wire. I sold a ton of it...Bob

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  • One1
    replied
    S’aright. I prefer Lincoln, but I’m about to switch gears and run some off brand stuff to find a diamond in the ruff the same way i did with INWELD 6010. That’s gotta be the best rod I’ve ran and...... INWELD, who?

    Ran another weave and it came together better. So that’s 2 for this year. Total. Back when i was doing 30 a day i could drink coffee and run the gun with the other hand. Mig bores me to death so i try and make it interesting.
    Attached Files

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I’ve used very little blue demon wire, and what I have used was stainless. I don’t really have any complaints but I don’t have any other experience with it. You like that stuff?

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  • Noel
    replied
    Tell you what I'd like to see, the weld cut down the middle , cut as you did but polished and etched.
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ID:	603441 The welding machine is working well. But that wasn't my point of issue. The issue was in the weaving you did for a covering pass. I was suggesting you rethink doing that and if you were to continue doing it, re-thinking how and why.

    Second was if you were, the speed you took in forward progression with the stepping ahead being to great too quickly resulting in the voids and the inconsistent blending in the toes of the weld. Your picture shows the ridges and valleys. No harm no foul. Those are weld discontinuties however.

    But it begs to ask the question, does a guy speak or forever keep his mouth shut when he sees something wrong? I'm to old to care so I speak up.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkbgXQ7Wl-Y

    I recently watched this video. Good camera stuff. Poor technique however and it showed up in the welds that were cut and etched.

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ID:	603443Over filling and poor weld profile. The face should be flatter and suggests gun to joint angle of inclination is off and the speed could be quicker with less of a deposit. As well I would have made a slight adjustment to the weld parameters.

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ID:	603444Is this fused? Or fused much I wonder? This is like fake news. I think it was the short circuit transfer? Looking at this and you have to thing short circuit transfer sucks but I'd blame the guy running it.

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ID:	603442This is a money shot and spray transfer. High Volts and wire speed. Yet to what value?

    As you mentioned, the results don't lie? What does is a picture and a belief all is well in Denmark if it shows a smooth weld face.

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ID:	603445 This shows a slight over filling, but the fusion while present still resulted in a lack of penetration into the inside of the corner. Need a slight increase in WFS in my opinion, a little less riding the puddle maybe but again, I'm just expressing my opinion.

    More to the point, you can do it. But that doesn't make it's right, better or a best practice.




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  • One1
    replied
    I’m running Autoset on hardwire. Just popped a fresh 11lb roll of Blue Demon 030 in before that run.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    She’s choochin along just fine. Lookin good, my friend. The glass islands are silica deposits. Depending on the wire manufacturer, silica is added in varying amounts as a deoxidizer. When the metal melts, so does the silica, latching on to whatever nasties it can and floating them to the surface. I’m sure you know, but others that don’t and if it comes up in a internet search, it should be removed before subsequent passes are made. It is not considered a defect.

    Autoset or manual?

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  • One1
    replied
    Solid to the edge of the toes. Results don’t lie. the 211 is working well.
    Attached Files

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