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  • #16
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ID:	602889These were shards from the fore mentioned washer that destructed. A magnet held next to the plastic outside altered the shards and with movement of the magnet, did cause movement in the shards.
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ID:	602890The same magnet did crap to metal particles in this dry section of an oil pan cut for future modification to increase capacity. .
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ID:	602891It might happen one day and if that day ever comes I'll take pictures. But I didn't see a reason to add oil. Magnetic drain plug, a good plan, magnet at the bottom out side the pan, not good for much as Franz mentioned.
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ID:	602892But back to welding and magnetism. +/-
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ID:	602893Who do you know with hair like that? Lol.

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    • #17
      Afternoon naps are the best. I start at 5am, at the shop at 7, open the doors at 8:30-9. Work like a maniac until about 2, have a huge lunch, close/lock the doors, prop the feet up, and nap half way through a physics lecture. Open back up at 4pm, deal with the "after work car pick ups", and grind again until about 8pm. Today the doors fell at 11pm. Suck it up buttercup. Work while you can, play while you can, make a difference and people will remember you. Only thing I am sad about is missing early days with my kids due to work. Turned out OK, fortunately. My Brady Bunch have impressed me with their doings.

      J.Caraher
      Wide Open Throttle Technologies (WOT-Tech), Pompano Beach FL
      Miller Sync 300,Hobart 190
      RogueFab pneumatic, Hossfeld Manual
      Kitamura CNC, Bridgeport 2j
      TunerPRO, HPTuners, AEM, Megasquirt, DynoJet
      NASA Racing Official/Driver

      YouTube Link, Instagram Link, FaceBook Link

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      • #18
        This is a xmas present from my wife, could have made the same thing with an old jam jar and some rare earth magnets but probably never would have got around to it, lots of fun to play with.

        I put rare earth magnets from old hard drives on my oil filters, maybe the paper filter would have caught those particles or maybe not but this way I know I pulled any iron particles out of the oil.

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        • #19
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ID:	602931 They say an olive a day keeps the doctor away. Well those olives come in jars and those jars I've found a use for.

          I guess the next step is seeing if a thinner steel, like that used in a filter will allow the magnet to pull something rather then just stick to the side?

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          • #20
            Canadians, always trying to sneak something by.
            Grit blasting or you got a wheelbrator up there in the snow drifts?

            I use it by the bag for deadblow tools.

            NO, you may not just dump used oil on the ground to beome next generation tar sands or pavement

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            • #21
              I'm not sneaking nothing and declaring everything. Garlic stuffed olives people, nice health snack. Second best part is the labels on these jars wash off easily and the jars display well. Fill them with junk and add crap to any space for decor.

              I use glass bead. Most of the stuff I make for mess get gone in a clean up. These accumulations were from cast iron, mild steel, high carbon and the tailings from cutting. I like to think I keep an interesting place for all ages to visit.

              We have a new way too transport our Alberta oil, you guys hear about that? For the record, I recycle. I fix what leaks. If I have a spill I clean it up. I'm a responsible guy Franz, lol, most days.

              I did do another experiment if you can call it that. As the metal gets thinner, you get attraction to particles. Limited, but some. Bottom of an oil pan, doubt it does anything. Bottom of an oil filter, maybe, but that would also mean the metal stuff is circulating. Inside or on the end of a drain plug, that's going to work effectively.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Noel View Post
                I'm not sneaking nothing and declaring everything.

                We have a new way too transport our Alberta oil, you guys hear about that? For the record, I recycle. I fix what leaks. If I have a spill I clean it up. I'm a responsible guy Franz, lol, most days.

                I did do another experiment if you can call it that. As the metal gets thinner, you get attraction to particles. Limited, but some. Bottom of an oil pan, doubt it does anything. Bottom of an oil filter, maybe, but that would also mean the metal stuff is circulating. Inside or on the end of a drain plug, that's going to work effectively.
                Resorted to pig manure and wood chips did you? Rototiller fluffs it nicely and the oil gets eaten by microbes in the manure. Crapperpillar built giant tillers for that technique in Californicate, but the imitation humans kept getting in the way.

                A magnet capturing at the filter is sort of too little too late. Ideally you want to capture in the pan so the pickup doesn't block off from chips & sludge.
                I used to have a setup for backwashing engines from valve covers down to the pan using a small pump and pan with #2 distilate for the wash. The carbon solids getting flushed out were considerable, especially on engines with turbos. Granules of carbon resembled tide detergent in size and shape.

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                • #23
                  "I used to have a setup for backwashing engines from valve covers down to the pan using a small pump and pan with #2 distilate for the wash. The carbon solids getting flushed out were considerable, especially on engines with turbos. Granules of carbon resembled tide detergent in size and shape."

                  Did you do this with the pistons, rods and crank installed?

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by skippyelwell View Post
                    "I used to have a setup for backwashing engines from valve covers down to the pan using a small pump and pan with #2 distilate for the wash. The carbon solids getting flushed out were considerable, especially on engines with turbos. Granules of carbon resembled tide detergent in size and shape."

                    Did you do this with the pistons, rods and crank installed?
                    Wouldn't it just flow down the oil galleys below the intake? Most of that oil is shot through the lifters, pushrods and rockers?

                    Noel, Flock of Seagulls? I wasn't old enough for that band, just remember the reference in Adam Sandler's Wedding Singer...

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by skippyelwell View Post
                      "I used to have a setup for backwashing engines from valve covers down to the pan using a small pump and pan with #2 distilate for the wash. The carbon solids getting flushed out were considerable, especially on engines with turbos. Granules of carbon resembled tide detergent in size and shape."

                      Did you do this with the pistons, rods and crank installed?
                      I've heard of a few back alley tricks to remove sludge... and I've tried most of them. Some with limited concern, adding a little ATF to a top up before an oil change, to filling a crank case with diesel, disconnecting the coil and cranking away.
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ID:	603042But a worn out engine is a worn out engine.
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ID:	603041You can't clean broken down and worn out, you might however make the parts less ugly to handle on tear down and inspection.
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ID:	603040Rumor has it they was an era of bad cams in GM small block. Sometimes I think it's just neglecting changing the oil.

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ID:	603039This was discovered after paying a professional to install their supplied good used engine. Long story, but the short is I got screwed, and I got my revenge.

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ID:	603043That said, I crafted a shaft to connect to the oil pump to oil prime an engine or for circulation and a 1/2" drill to spin it and the oil pump.

                      My conclusion is that a magnetic on the drain plug is a good thing, but if it's collecting metal particles, chances are pretty good you have bigger worries then sludge to worry about.



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                      • #26
                        Object of long flushing with a pump & Diesel was to clear the returns and flush the accumulated carbon out of MoPar 318s with hours of idle time. If they weren't flushed the crud in the pan would block intake screens to the pump delivering ZERO oil pressure and a locked up engine. Retain the oil drained before flushing, put it back into the engine for a 5 minute run, drain, change filter and refill with new oil. Worked like a charm and none of the engines that were flushed experienced oil failure for another 50k miles.

                        As to additives back in the 50s & 60s we could get a product called Metropolitan Sludge eliminator that was used in Diesel marine fuel to retain the parefine in suspension and eliminate plugged fuel systems. Adding an ounce to the lube oil of an engine and letting it idle for 10 minutes kept oil systems cleaned out and lube flowing.

                        Quality lube oil is the answer to long engine life. My 78 pickup came from Dealer to my place with the factory oil, about 20 miles, and got an oil change to DA Gold Diesel service oil. At 80k miles it developed a leak in the timing chain gasket. Since the cover was coming off, I bought a new chain and sprockets since GM 350 chains and sprockets were well known to erode the plastic off the sprocket and chains were known to be sloppy from pin wear. When the cover was off it was very apparent quality oil saves parts. The original sprockets weren't eroded and the chain had no more play in its pins than the replacement had. That engine went back together with the factory parts & a new gasket & seal and ran another 55k without problems until the pickup was totaled in a wreck.

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                        • #27
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ID:	603063It brings back old memories looking at this, but when I do, I remember. I had to drive them out with a hammer. Oh yea. Noel was an angry man.
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ID:	603064Once again proving do it yourself gets it done. I took the easy road and still ended up on the hard road, should have just stayed on it in the first place.
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ID:	603065For those who like mechanical clean.


                          "Quality lube oil is the answer to long engine life." Couldn't agree more. Changing it, that takes the effort and isn't getting any cheaper. But I do mine. It's done down to a fine science of quick fast knowing the job all to well. While the ones that sit parked are usually filled with synthetic, the regulars get house brand 5/30 and changed out at 5000k no matter the weather, which means if they look to be needing an oil change in the middle of winter it gets parked and I drive something else.

                          I've told my kids there is a lot they can neglect, bills for instance...but never oil changes.

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                          • #28
                            Shoulda used a deadblow and avoided that excessive tool bounce. That dang bounce probably cost you 19-23 additional hits.

                            Tell them kids how much of that synthetic product comes from a rendering plant and watch their faces.

                            I miss the days of DA Gold 30 weight by the barrel. Got good enough with the sucker I could do most from the top if they came in hot. Filters were a PITA, but sucking oil out beats crawling under or degreasing belts on mowers.
                            Them suckers was real hard to build too, especially after I bought a cart full of patient suction units in a hospital auction.. Work good for bleeding brakes too.

                            Sucker even worked when the wife's baby boy stuffed 7 quarts in his Pontiac LeMans. But that's another story.

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                            • #29
                              Here in the lower 48 we do't have long Winter nights to play with maganets like you do. Our maganets have to earn their keep or they get sent off to be ground up and glued back together in different shapes. I managed to rescue this one and it sure works well pulling chips from the mill or drill press. Fortunately I had all the other parts to put it together on my junque pile.. That package of JB Weld ut a hurting on the vittle budget that week.

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                              • #30
                                Revenge was served cold. ..and in the evening around 11pm. I took it ALL apart and scattered ALL the parts in the entrance way of the drive into the shop who screwed me over. Then I called them in the morning to let them know I returned the engine they installed.




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                                14 years later I still have the van, and I'm still holding the grudge. Just not as tightly.

                                I did buy a hand held fluid suction pump. Like a tire pump. Works quite well actually. I use it before I do transmission service and the odd differential fluid change. I'm telling you, looks crowded in my garage, but most of it is there for a reason even if the reason is it's not needed at this time. I don't buy in 5 gallon pails, but I do buy by the case.





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