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Battery terminal repair

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  • Noel
    replied
    Yea, the bolt looks crafty doesn't it! And so does this battery disconnect.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_6770.JPG
Views:	165
Size:	108.5 KB
ID:	602698I tend to have vehicles sit for extended periods so this saves hook up times to get in and go, as well dead battery issues. Quick and simple. Less stripped terminal bolts.
    Attached Files

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  • Forced_Firebird
    replied
    Originally posted by Noel View Post
    [ATTACH=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"medium","data-attachmentid":602694**[/ATTACH] My solution is cheaper.
    Haha! I have a Trans Am GTA in the shop right now where the owner did the very same thing.

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  • Noel
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_6769.JPG
Views:	169
Size:	71.6 KB
ID:	602694 My solution is cheaper.

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  • Franz©
    replied
    WirthCo 30400 Battery Doctor Side Mount Long Stud Terminal Battery Bolt

    Save your eyes & body

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I agree about those side terminals. I was thinking of setting a threaded insert into the lead and melting some filler around it.

    The only time I’ve had the side terminal junk I used those screw-in tits to make it like a normal battery. Fortunately it wasn’t in a car anymore at that point.

    Our fire trucks have screw in terminals, but they’re a heck of a lot more skookum than those small batteries.

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  • Forced_Firebird
    replied
    That GM side post design is such a PITA and had that very same scenario when an id10t over torqued the snot out of one a few years ago. It was also a friend, so to try to get him back on the road attempted to drill/tread it and found that it indeed has a steel insert. He was trying to leave that night for Indiana from here in South Florida and we were packing his car all eve, so it was too late to go and purchase one anywhere. Fortunately there was another GM car in the shop, so I let him use that one to get home. Customer wasn't happy (also another mutual friend at least) since his was a red top sealed cell. That was in 2016 and the battery with the bad terminal is the very one sitting next to the tire machine.

    ....and as far as young, that's a relative term. The beard is grey and my one of the four offspring graduates college in a few weeks, the rest are in high school, but am still a few years from getting my AARP card and/or senior discounts at the greasy spoon - just was in a different industry before opening shop in '07 and retiring the contracting license completely in '10.

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  • Fix Until Broke
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    I have an immediate use for a repair like that. Friend of mine has one of those side terminal screw in type batteries and one of the terminals is stripped out. I was considering just using a soldering gun and melting some lead in and around the screw in doohickey. This looks way more effective.
    Many of those have steel inserts for the threads, similar to what you'd find in a plastic part, so if you're planning to re-use the side terminal, you might want to consider how to replace or replicate this. If you're just going to put a post on it and change the type of connection, than it probably does not matter much.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I have an immediate use for a repair like that. Friend of mine has one of those side terminal screw in type batteries and one of the terminals is stripped out. I was considering just using a soldering gun and melting some lead in and around the screw in doohickey. This looks way more effective.

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    Can't go too hard on the kids when it comes to hard rubber cased batterys Griff, they probably never saw one.
    They also never saw Edison batterys or 2 ton trucks powered by them or battery boxes buried next to RR tracks for the signals containing glass cased Edisons that got changed out to go back for charge by a crew with a motorcart and trailer.

    Far as rubber cases discharging goes, a fellow from Gould once explained the rubber was actually pourous, and sufficient electrolyte got thru the rubber to become a current carrying path or secondary battery like a Bagdad battery. It was a little beyond my scope of understanding, but I sure remembered the problem.

    Still remember the first battery I rebuilt the bridges on it was on a Massey Harris and the old man hooked it up backwards. When the tractor started lead flew from those straps and evil words flew. Being a kid just smart enough to solder and dumb enough to not know the safety issues I grabbed a big copper and a bar of solder and rebuilt the straps in place. Connected it up correctly and charged the battery with the old Silver Beauty overnight. Tractor started & ran just fine the next morning. The old man got pissed again because he was sure that new battery had been money down a rathole.
    Battery lasted a few years.

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  • Forced_Firebird
    replied
    I honestly missed the rubber part, and replied after reading plastic. I deal with modern plastic case batteries often, and the tire balancer runs on 12v. So, there's a battery sitting right next to it on bare concrete. Can't tell you how many times people mention that it's going to discharge, but it doesn't. The machine isn't used but a few times a month, and doesn't draw a lot of current, so a charge lasts a very long time.

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  • griff01
    replied
    Originally posted by Franz© View Post
    Used to do this in Niagara falls into the 1970s when OSHA declared it unsafe. Also rebuilt cell to cell bridges pretty much the same way, and replaced individual cells in big batterys in hard rubber cases with pitch tops.

    Hard rubber cases were the reason batterys didn't sit on concrete because they would self discharge.

    https://youtu.be/7CDAlu8VxEE

    Carbon electrodes are used because they heat "slow" and withstand the short circuit.

    I recommend against trying it with a plastic cased battery.
    We were still repairing fork truck & tugger batteries that way when I left my Power House job in 2004.
    And to the youngsters telling Franz he is wrong about batteries discharging while sitting on concrete, too bad.
    Franz is correct. The old rubber cased batteries would indeed, discharge while sitting on concrete.

    Griff

    Leave a comment:


  • Helios
    replied
    Storing batteries on concrete hasn't been a problem since they stopped making battery cases out of wood.

    https://northeastbattery.com/do-ceme...car-batteries/

    https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/ge...tored-concrete
    Last edited by Helios; 10-02-2019, 05:28 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    Let me guess; You also believe all that scientific writing that says Bumblebees can not fly due to aerodynamics, The men and women in Washington DC know what they're doing, You never oiled a battery cell, and you never handled a rubber case lead acid battery with wood plate separators.

    Leave a comment:


  • Forced_Firebird
    replied
    Concrete certainly does not discharge batteries! Hogwash.

    People often forget battery positive attracts, negative repels electrons. "Ground aka "Earth" actually repels electrons. Lighting actually goes "up".

    Old physics joke/riddle: How far does an electron move in xx time vs xx length? Many make @$$umptions disregarding the Boolean effect. You push one electron, one pops out the other end, so movement is minimal.

    Concrete is a poor conductor sitting at the bottom of an extremely good insulator (plastic). Lead acid is no exception, electrons are great at spooky action, not so great at performing miracles aside from FTL speeds. Only way a battery drains is by having a Great Attractor. :P

    Age can drain a battery, but it's due to electron looses to the atmosphere, but not by placing it on a stone/mortar mix...sorry to my Grandpa Vaughan, science>myth.

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    started a topic Battery terminal repair

    Battery terminal repair

    Used to do this in Niagara falls into the 1970s when OSHA declared it unsafe. Also rebuilt cell to cell bridges pretty much the same way, and replaced individual cells in big batterys in hard rubber cases with pitch tops.

    Hard rubber cases were the reason batterys didn't sit on concrete because they would self discharge.

    https://youtu.be/7CDAlu8VxEE

    Carbon electrodes are used because they heat "slow" and withstand the short circuit.

    I recommend against trying it with a plastic cased battery.
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