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filling a gap with a spool gun

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  • OscarJr
    replied
    Correct, that is more for robotic manufacturing processes. Definitely can't see it (in stock form) welding in and around roll-cage tubing assemblies. I was simply referring to the type of setup compared to tip-tig.

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  • tarry99
    replied
    Originally posted by OscarJr View Post

    That's where a TopTig-type setup could help. The wire feed path and guide are integrated into the cup, so needed clearances are minimized.
    Hummm........The setups I've seen are bulky at the tip w/ feed off to the side and in no way could you weld inside and around a intersection where 2-3 tubes are coming together where now I have the tungsten stuck out 3/4" + with a gas cup..........don't get me wrong I see some benefits to the top tig ........but not yet for me on specialty work. Thanks

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    It looks like the tip tig torch is a big odd shaped and larger than normal torches, so I don’t think it would be good for getting into tight areas for roll cages. The tip tig also runs hot wire and vibrates it. Probably not at all intended for repair work, but certainly for production. It’s still pretty cool.

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  • OscarJr
    replied
    Originally posted by tarry99 View Post
    Not so sure getting into tight areas on a roll cage would help?
    That's where a TopTig-type setup could help. The wire feed path and guide are integrated into the cup, so needed clearances are minimized. But obviously those are proprietary systems where they won't just sell you the specialized cups. You'd have to make your own, which would be pretty cool. I could see a cup made of Hastelloy-X for the ultimate in heat/corrosion resistance in a TIG cup, with an insulated (and replaceable) copper wire guide welded onto the side going inside the cup via a small Hastelloy-X "tip holder" welded to the cup. Then you need a beefy wire drive system in order to have the wire feed through a sharp, small-radius 90° turn in order to not take up a lot of clearance space around the TIG torch.

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  • tarry99
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    This is the tip tig I was talking about:

    https://youtu.be/tZyntkRFXto
    Yep I've seen that before........I would guess on the production side it would be beneficial......Not so sure getting into tight areas on a roll cage would help?........and wondering where if any is the benefit on weld quality vs Mig or arc other than speed but setting up the equipment is another factor that may only work on long runs?.........Thanks

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  • OscarJr
    replied
    TipTig is basically what [email protected] was replicating. Its still a relatively slow process since its still TIG. Now, TopTig is cooler and works a bit faster, but its still not as fast as MIG.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    This is the tip tig I was talking about:

    https://youtu.be/tZyntkRFXto

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Have you seen the tip tig process, Tarry? It’s hot wire feed tig welding. And the wire vibrates. It’s pretty awesome.

    So What I’ve been doing to clean it, and it works really well, is this:

    Get in there with a scraper to get the peddles out, give it a good spray down with brake cleaner and watch the schmoo just metal away, then I use wire wheel on a grinder, then brake cleaner again, then I spray it down with some aluminum cleaner, like that weldmark spray bottle stuff that kind of smells sulphury.

    Works great. You darn sure know when you hit a spot that isn’t clean enough. My left knee looks like Swiss cheee from the BBs flying out of the of the weld puddle.

    As far as the anti-stick fluid....they’re old school.

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  • Franz©
    replied
    Nothing stops the new adjust on the fly SuperSpool Gun Ryan uses.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8l_2...ature=youtu.be

    That baby fills gaps like nothing else

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  • tarry99
    replied
    I'm wondering how your getting that aluminum body clean enough to weld with all the asphalt garbage everywhere? I've welded for hours w/7018 in steel trailers that have seen asphalt.......and it's a PITA......we did use the UHMW plastic for that purpose in our steel trailers.........worked well but we also haul demo concrete and it tears it up.........so I added air vibrators to the body and use a synthetic EPA approved release agent that lasts a few loads before you have to reapply when hauling AC.............Not a perfect world.

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  • usufruct
    replied
    Thanks for introducing me to the concept of adjusting parameters on the fly with MIG. First thing I thought of when I read the original post was if this might be a case for Aaron's ( 6061.com) use of a MIG feeder to supply filler metal when there is a large gap? https://youtu.be/T1KRaZAIqdw

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Solid advice. Thanks. I have some 1/4” aluminum rod and I can actually roll that out a little thinner if need be in one of the rolling mills.

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  • MMW
    replied
    For steel I carry lengths of different diameters of round stock for just this purpose. Rounds are cheap. 1/4", 3/8", and 1/2". should work the same for aluminum. I also doubt that 1/8" will do anything other than disappear before the puddle gets to it. I would use something bigger.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Be better is it was a cold beer.

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  • Olivero
    replied
    That is odd, I guess it's just mother nature at her finest.

    Lol, coffee is always good.

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