Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Using water submersion to keep work cool/straight.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Probably caused by the magnet toys.

    You should have used a proper Pyrex baking pan too, that would have insulated the job from the bench.

    Comment


    • #47
      I did use Pyrex Franz, just didn't want to splatter it up so I covered it in tin foil. From the garage to the kitchen sink. Tin foil I left in the garage, I'll use It again.

      Around glass I always take extra precautions having blistered the door glass in a Ford Ranger once plugging mirror holes. Only one door and after the first of three holes I woke up to what I'd done, but by then it was to late. I remember it clearly. I was thinking about the asbestos blanket laying on the seat to protect it from sparks when I wondered why I didn't need to protect the glass? I remember the moment.

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by Franz© View Post
        Been meaning to contact you about that coffee shop thing Tack.
        Your barista Glonk, a female Klingon has filed a complaint you threw a 3 in the tip jar and took out 5 7s as change for the 3.
        And your comment about Glonk's short legs and lower body were overheard.
        Glonk doesn't move a lot because she has a reach of 17' 2" with either claw, and a bit of tood about being tossed from the intergalactic BB team for dunking everything she got a claw on.
        Having seen Glonk you undoubtedly understand why Klingon males are such fierce warriors. They don't want to go home to their assigned domestic partners.

        Thanks for stopping by Franz Zero-Gravity Dougnut Shop ® on your trip, hope you enjoyed your 6½ doughnuts but don't try the baker's dozen stunt again on half a dozen. I ought to bill you for cleaning costs on that machine. How'd you like your tripleshotdouble late frapuchino. Glonk whips those out nicely.


        Franz, please tell Miss Glonk she got me mixed up with someone else, I swiped the Martian Card Art Bell gave me which included a three 12s tip Martian for her.

        Evidently Glonks have good hearing. I can't believe she head my comments about her body parts being so short, she was 17' 2" away when I quietly made them to a Klingon welder standing behind me.

        I'm sorry for trying to scam Glonk out of 6 1/2 doughnuts, I was just testing Glonks mathematical skills out for Art Bell and Linda Moulton Howe.

        Don't say anything but Ed Dames has been remote viewing her for months and has come to the conclusion she is not a Glonk but a Klong la klong #7, .. which have the ability to make fantastic doughnuts and trippleshotdouble late frapuchinos, after reading all of Ed's report on Glonk, It's understandable why you hired her to run your Area51 Franz Zero-Gravity Dougnut Shop ®.

        Franz the doughnuts were absolutely out of this world, so light and delicious, after Art Bell ate two he began to cry like a baby, he said he can't contain himself after eating them they taste so wonderful, I have to ask, is there a secret out of this world ingredient in them?
        Send me the bill for clean up, I'll pay it as soon as my Coast to Coast paycheck arrives.

        P.S. Franz did you get the heat-less anti-warp wire and Kosher Welding Wieners I snatched from Area 51 and sent to you? Remember, they have to be used together to get the no warping properties from them.

        And with that I'll say.....Good night Mrs Kalabash where ever you are.

        Comment


        • #49
          Tack is a master fudger- he went to work on the railroad and convinced the yard boss as a signal maintainer his primary job was converting turn signals on locomotives to electric from kerosene and keeping them working right. After 9 years of hunting those turn signals Tack switched to installing replacements for missing signals on Diesels. 10 years later a new yard boss came along and offered Tack a package to retire. Naturally Tack counter offered and became Superintendent.



          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by Franz© View Post
            Tack is a master fudger- he went to work on the railroad and convinced the yard boss as a signal maintainer his primary job was converting turn signals on locomotives to electric from kerosene and keeping them working right. After 9 years of hunting those turn signals Tack switched to installing replacements for missing signals on Diesels. 10 years later a new yard boss came along and offered Tack a package to retire. Naturally Tack counter offered and became Superintendent.



            I liked working in the Signal Department but riding in the top house of a caboose with the conductor, (back in the days they ran cabooses and had conductors or in the engine as headman brakeman) was a great job too. The Signal Department is where I struck my first arc. The welder assigned to resurface our retarder shoe beam chair pads actually taught me how to weld and allowed me to practice on my lunch hour. those were great days and I worked with a great bunch of railroaders, I actually go my job in the Signal Department while at home on leave before I went to Vietnam, I had 45 days of leave and 10 Day's travel time? to get to Oakland Army Base. My Signal supervisor liked me and asked me when I got back and out of the service to come back to work for him so I did.

            Comment


            • #51
              High houses brake pressure gauges kerosene lanterns followed by Ray-O-Vac hand lanterns and men who could stay in the bunk as the caboose whipped all pretty much went away when ConRail came along with the ugly green shack on a flatcar caboose. And then came the dreaded EOT device that killed 2 jobs per train.

              There is a short haul road here that runs from the salt mine up to Rochester that still runs some cabooses in Winter. In the 70s they let a bunch of college kids from RIT try to develop a system to let the conductor know where the train was in fog. Government kicked in some heavy coin, and nobody admitted knowing anything about the evolving GPS world. The Railroad maintains an image as a cute little local short haul line. They are even conning governments at all levels to give them money to replace 11 foot high underpasses from the 1930s. They can't even afford the paint to cover the head end tower everybody going into Rochester Airport passes.
              They can't afford new power so they keep making Diesel smoke and get waivers on emissions.

              They also don't mention having built that short haul road into a short line holding company operating on 4 continents.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by Noel View Post
                ..........Now after all this, if you still think welding in a water bath is going to control distortion you are wrong. It doesn't. Call it a fail. That coupon if you look closely in picture #1 on the bottom, #2, far right , it took a twist.
                Noel - Thanks for taking the time/effort to do this experiment, even though it turned out "bad", that's how some experiments turn out.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Those three coupons are still resting in the garage and I'm sure I'll be fondling them at least once more before I toss them in the scrap heap. I thought I might just cut and etch them? Hit them with a file to note hardness?

                  While learning through failure is still learning, being successful does taste sweeter. I think the sucess was the discussion and opinions shared. The experiment was seemingly flawed and slightly foolish.
                  Thanks, your welcome, and if it was mildly educational and entertaining, all the better.

                  I'm still curious about those things you were welding up? Posting those pictures provided a clarity and understanding of what was involved and accomplished. I thought it was great you posted the pictures detailing the work.

                  I hope my comment regarding the melting wasn't upsetting. It stems from a condition called thinking to much. Frankly, I looked at those picture quite a bit and thought plenty of what I might have accomplished faced with that project and it would have been a hard act to top what you did.

                  Then I started thinking about the water thing, dissipating heat, conduction, current flow, arc characteristics, how I hate changing tungsten, gas lens, no gas lens, metallurgy and the HAZ, the wash and melt of metal while failing too remember, appearance is not a criteria for success or failure, end results are. But it got me thinking about small welds, less heat.

                  https://microarcwelding.com/services/

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	In_proc_micro_wled.jpg
Views:	36
Size:	39.2 KB
ID:	601947 Like I mentioned, thinking too much.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJJqn_y0ycU

                    Thanks Tackit. Followed the link you posted in another post and found this.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Noel View Post
                      Those three coupons are still resting in the garage and I'm sure I'll be fondling them at least once more before I toss them in the scrap heap. I thought I might just cut and etch them? Hit them with a file to note hardness?

                      While learning through failure is still learning, being successful does taste sweeter. I think the sucess was the discussion and opinions shared. The experiment was seemingly flawed and slightly foolish.
                      Thanks, your welcome, and if it was mildly educational and entertaining, all the better.

                      I'm still curious about those things you were welding up? Posting those pictures provided a clarity and understanding of what was involved and accomplished. I thought it was great you posted the pictures detailing the work.

                      I hope my comment regarding the melting wasn't upsetting. It stems from a condition called thinking to much. Frankly, I looked at those picture quite a bit and thought plenty of what I might have accomplished faced with that project and it would have been a hard act to top what you did.

                      Then I started thinking about the water thing, dissipating heat, conduction, current flow, arc characteristics, how I hate changing tungsten, gas lens, no gas lens, metallurgy and the HAZ, the wash and melt of metal while failing too remember, appearance is not a criteria for success or failure, end results are. But it got me thinking about small welds, less heat.

                      https://microarcwelding.com/services/

                      [ATTACH=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"medium","data-attachmentid":601947**[/ATTACH] Like I mentioned, thinking too much.
                      Sorry to hear that you thought the experiment was flawed/foolish, but agree that sometimes the success is the discussion and thought process. Just to continue on that theme - what would your definition of success have been?

                      Are you curious about these things? If so, what would you like to know?
                      Click image for larger version

Name:	retaining-ring-welding-5-welded-cooled.jpg?resize=650%2C650.jpg
Views:	33
Size:	115.5 KB
ID:	601954

                      Don't worry, no offense taken here - I think too much sometimes too Fix Until Broke isn't just a physical action, sometimes it's a mental one too.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Maybe flawed and foolish was a bit harsh. But I was reasonably sure of the out come. I can also guess that if some variables were changed, not much would change.
                        Click image for larger version

Name:	Box column.jpg
Views:	27
Size:	69.5 KB
ID:	601965My idea of success would have been to weld sequence another couple sets of coupons. I would have like to have tagged the gun to a track drive to add greater consistency. Maybe a set clamped firmly? I might also have called it out as being more sucessful if the saving of time was more available in discussing the value of the effort. Cooling of the receiver tube was to do what if not save time?

                        Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_6418.JPG
Views:	33
Size:	60.4 KB
ID:	601962Bottom is one, middle two, top three. Did the cut 3/4" in off the start.
                        Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_6433.JPG
Views:	28
Size:	52.7 KB
ID:	601963Bottom three, middle two, one on top. A little muratic acid and a Q tip.
                        Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_6455.JPG
Views:	29
Size:	64.0 KB
ID:	601964The definition sucked, but I was in a hurry. However, look closely and you can maybe make out some HAZ shading, a lack of fusion, and off side fusion from a failure to keep the gun straight. I was in a hurry.

                        I'm thinking that picture is of a pop off valve? Looks like it threads in, has a spring...haven't a clue, only guesses. But it looks like that to me? What's it used for?



                        Comment


                        • #57
                          I guess we didn't discus our hypothesis before executing the experiment. I was thinking there would be a difference in angle between the pieces based on the variables. Maybe the water cooled one would change by 8 degrees where as the air cooled one changes by 12 degrees and the aluminum backed one changed by 20 degrees. The one that changed angle the least would be the one least likely to distort when making an assembly (such as a receiver tube).

                          Sometimes it's not about saving time/effort/resources right now (or ever) - we'd spend hours or sometimes even days discussing how to setup and run a 10 second test and then more time analyzing the results and turning that data into useful information. The results of this effort was to be able to gain a competitive understanding of the variables and their contributions to the results so we could use that knowledge for future applications or processes. It's a different mentality versus "I need to get this done". In this case, if we can identify what variables make the parts warp more or less, we can use that knowledge in the next thing we build to get the outcome we want (and predictably) rather than what Jeremy did in his video and have it warp then have to scrap the part and rebuild. For a single part like he was making, it's not a big deal and the time/effort that it took to make the mistake and then fix it is trivial to what it would take to do what we're discussing in our experiment. Now, flip things around a bit and put yourself in a production environment where you're making a $10 part every 7 seconds 24/7 and you can see where you can spend a $100k to figure some of these things out and then use that info to create mathematical models to predict what the next design will do so you don't have to reinvent that wheel again.

                          The part is a check valve - similar to a valve used in engines. Very light spring relative to the mass of the valve itself for low pressure opening (maybe a couple psi), The spring was also closed/ground so has at least 270 degrees of contact with the retainer part that I welded on. Since the retainer was a nice bright orange color after welding, I'm assuming that the tail of the spring would have been a similar color and therefore could have caused a spring failure. Since the spring force was so low, the stem/retainer joint strength was orders of magnitude higher than it needed to be, so even if there was a heat effected zone and other compromises, it wouldn't be a big deal. This was a proof of concept prototype - I tried to convince them that a press fit of the ring on the stem of the valve would be a better solution instead of welding, but "what if's..." kept coming up so I hot glued them together .

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            WTF has any of that got to do with weiner cooking alternatives?

                            All this iron crud is getting worse than the brawl that breaks out at a Pipe Weldor's picnic when a beer barrel gets knocked over and the tap gets busted.

                            Get on the stick boys. Is a small tree branch freshly cut and debarked better for holding yer weenie over the fire or should only 309 wire be used?

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Franz© View Post
                              WTF has any of that got to do with weiner cooking alternatives?

                              All this iron crud is getting worse than the brawl that breaks out at a Pipe Weldor's picnic when a beer barrel gets knocked over and the tap gets busted.

                              Get on the stick boys. Is a small tree branch freshly cut and debarked better for holding yer weenie over the fire or should only 309 wire be used?
                              Absolutely nothing - the thread you're looking for is here...

                              https://forum.millerwelds.com/forum/...elding-wieners

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Wow! I never thought my "thought experiment" would generate so much interest here - good stuff peeps!

                                So, may I ask, why does this Franz fella have so many orange bar thingies under his name from a few months of membership? Is there some secret club we can joint to have orange bar thingies?

                                Thanks for all the replies/insight!

                                On another note, I was poaching chicken boneless/skinless [email protected] Albeit bland, I find if you keep the water just under a boil, you can slow cook the center to exactly 160°, remove from water and let rest for 5 minutes...then you will have EXACTLY 165° chicken so it remains moist while being fully cooked.

                                Noel your hotdog experiment wouldn't work on my grill - I keep the 'dogs turning so they cook even, best taken off the burner when they just show signs of splitting.
                                J.Caraher
                                Wide Open Throttle Technologies (WOT-Tech), Pompano Beach FL
                                Miller Sync 300,Hobart 190
                                RogueFab pneumatic, Hossfeld Manual
                                Kitamura CNC, Bridgeport 2j
                                TunerPRO, HPTuners, AEM, Megasquirt, DynoJet
                                NASA Racing Official/Driver

                                YouTube Link, Instagram Link, FaceBook Link

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X