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Bobcat 225NT R2 resistor

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  • Bobcat 225NT R2 resistor

    I am looking for my Sept ‘99 Bobcat 225NT R2 resistor (Part#184 278), but cant seem to find it anywhere. Do these go bad often? Any idea where I can find this resistor?

  • #2
    You might have an old p/n. Sometimes there is an updated number, but you’ll have to call
    Miller tech support to find out. Its worth a shot. I plugged that number in a few places and didn’t come up with anything solid.

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    • #3
      I can't tell you if they go bad often, but thankfully not a big deal to find a replacement. Parts list says its 5 ohms, 225 watts. Verify that I got the right manual for your serial number (wasn't posted) and be sure those are the right specs.

      Mouser has 'em. You may have to make some mounting adaptations, or maybe not.

      https://www.mouser.com/Passive-Components/Resistors/Wirewound-Resistors/_/N-7fx9f?P=1z0x88nZ1z0wo5r

      Several choices pictured on the link above. Is it adjustable--does it have the moveable band on it, or is just a standard 2-terminal fixed resistor? It looks like that's what it is, but I can't be sure without seeing it. If it isn't adjustable, it's going to cost you about 25 bucks; 50 if its adjustable. Mouser is a very reliable company--I buy stuff from them often. If it turns out to be the adjustable one, you are going to probably have to call Miller to get the adjustment procedure.

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      • #4
        Would a 5 ohm 300 w resistor work? Miller part 119998 appears to be readily available.

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        • #5
          Yep--that would work fine as long as there was room to mount it--it would likely be a little bigger. Assuming it's not adjustable, It's twice the price of Mouser on Miller4less.

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          • #6
            I did en eBay search for 5 ohm 225 watt resister and they’re super cheap. I have no idea what they should cost, but the prices seem reasonable. It would probably make me feel a little better, being that I’m a dummy on this stuff, to get one that made for a welding machine. You’d know, not me, Wayne.

            I also see fixed and adjustable resistors. I’ve only seen the adjustable style inside of my machines.

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            • #7
              As long as it's a good brand name like Ohmite, or Clarostat, (those are the two that come to mind; I'm sure there are others that I've long forgotten), I don't think there is much that could be different about one for a welder. I'd avoid cheap Chinese knockoffs just out of concern for the integrity of the ceramic base/substrate and the quality of the welded connection between the nichrome wire and the terminals. A high power resistor is just a ceramic substrate with nichrome wire wound around it, and terminals welded to the ends of the wire and attached to the ceramic base. Then, they usually bake a ceramic cover over it. Not much you can do differently for different applications.

              In the obviously obsolete " ballpark price estimate database" in my antique mind, I would expect to pay about 10 or 15 bucks for a good one, so about 20 or 25 for a brand new one from a distributor seems reasonable at today's prices.

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              • #8
                Thanks for all the replies! I will definitely give Miller a call to see what the deal is with the p/n. I wasn’t sure where to go with buying another unless it was a OEM replacement, not knowing much about them.
                My R2 is not adjustable. It looks similar to the one in the attached picture. This attached picture is not mine, I snagged it online. It’s the same shape and terminal style though. Mine is white (ceramic?) and there’s three terminals and no band.
                As far as the resistance and wattage of the resistor goes,
                can I use a different ohm/wattage?
                Attached Files

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                • #9
                  You need the same resistance-5 ohms if I was looking at the right manual. Post your ser no. and we can verify the correct manual. But you can use any wattage equal to or greater than the 225 watts they spec. That photo does show a heavier duty resistor than in the link I posted to Mouser--probably to withstand vibration better. So, Ryan's right-they do have a heavier duty welder version. My bad. If yours has 3 terminals, it is a "tapped" resistor. Are all 3 terminals wired, or only two of them? If yours is wired to the "tap" and one end terminal and not just to the ends, you definitely need to find out the resistance actually used in the circuit-just buying a 5 ohm resistor won't solve the problem, as noted in post #3. Can you post a picture of yours? I assume that since yours is bad you can't just measure the resistance?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
                    You need the same resistance-5 ohms if I was looking at the right manual. Post your ser no. and we can verify the correct manual. But you can use any wattage equal to or greater than the 225 watts they spec. That photo does show a heavier duty resistor than in the link I posted to Mouser--probably to withstand vibration better. So, Ryan's right-they do have a heavier duty welder version. My bad. If yours has 3 terminals, it is a "tapped" resistor. Are all 3 terminals wired, or only two of them? If yours is wired to the "tap" and one end terminal and not just to the ends, you definitely need to find out the resistance actually used in the circuit-just buying a 5 ohm resistor won't solve the problem, as noted in post #3. Can you post a picture of yours? I assume that since yours is bad you can't just measure the resistance?
                    Thanks for the info! I did take a picture of my R2.It read 5.4ohms from the outside legs, so it may be good still?

                    EDIT: I uploaded my serial number below. It’s is a KK model.
                    https://www.millerwelds.com/files/ow.../O405E_MIL.pdf
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by Trgglynn; 09-03-2019, 11:22 AM.

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                    • #11
                      5.4 ohms is well within a 10% tolerance, which is pretty standard, so I'd say it's good. Since the "tap" terminal is not wired, you don't have to worry about that. So, this begs the question why you thought the resistor was bad in the first place? I assume there is something the Bobcat isn't doing that it's supposed to do?

                      You can't always just go by the two letters on the front of the serial number--very often there are changes without changing the letters--you have to verify the entire number. If you need additional help, please post the entire serial number. Really cheap fix so far!

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