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ironman 230 vs lincoln 256. here we go again

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    There are several small stick welders out there, brand new, that are dual voltage and in the lower price range. Once you want a wire feed, the price jumps a good deal.

    One of the reasons I got this small, 115v mig was for what you’re wanting it for. Honestly, I’ve never moved it from its spot next to the welding bench. It’s just too heavy and pulls too much power. I even eventually ran a separate 30amp circuit just to run that machine. It welds nice, I really like running .030 FC through it, but it’s redundant at this point.

    The maxstar I have is primarily a tig welder, but I’ve ran more stick on it as of late.

    I don’t believe those small migs are as portable as some would like to believe. You go plugging that thing in at your buddy’s house, you’re going to spend half the day flipping the breakers back on. That’s been my experience at least. My little machine is a Lincoln 140c. Inverter technology has most certainly improved on the weight and amperage draw I’d expect. That leaves you looking in the new or near new range.

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  • caleb90
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    That depends. You say “small gauge”, so maybe your definition of that is different than mine. I have a small maxstar 150 STH. It’s a dual voltage stick and tig machine that I use for field work. I’ve used the living daylights out of it. Now it’s only DC tig, so no aluminum, but it is HF start and it welds superb in both 115v and 230v. I’ve also ran several hundred pounds of rod on it and have never hit the duty cycle. On 115v, it is limited to 100amps, but I’ve ran 3/32 7018 stick after stick and stick and never tripped a breaker or hit the thermal overload. You can weld a lot of steel with a 3/32 7018 rod. And it weighs 11lbs. You can sling it on your back and hang it off the top of a ladder....been there, done it. Now my little 115v mig will trip a 20amp breaker in about 7 seconds.
    1/8th in or under for light gauge material. i just want one for flux core and stick use only. if i want to tig i will buy a stand alone unit that is ac so i can weld aluminum.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    That depends. You say “small gauge”, so maybe your definition of that is different than mine. I have a small maxstar 150 STH. It’s a dual voltage stick and tig machine that I use for field work. I’ve used the living daylights out of it. Now it’s only DC tig, so no aluminum, but it is HF start and it welds superb in both 115v and 230v. I’ve also ran several hundred pounds of rod on it and have never hit the duty cycle. On 115v, it is limited to 100amps, but I’ve ran 3/32 7018 stick after stick and stick and never tripped a breaker or hit the thermal overload. You can weld a lot of steel with a 3/32 7018 rod. And it weighs 11lbs. You can sling it on your back and hang it off the top of a ladder....been there, done it. Now my little 115v mig will trip a 20amp breaker in about 7 seconds.

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  • caleb90
    replied
    Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
    a small multiprocess machine ain't the end of the world. He has a IM230 for his shop work now- and a portable machine is nice to have for field work.

    I'd probably look at a 120.240v machine though- unfortunately mo' money but you wont need to hump a generator around.

    'tis like a transiiter radio to your stereo console
    i like the idea of the 120/240v machines but your pretty much stuck with small gauge material on 120, exspecially if running off an exstension cord. we will see though going to be a while before i buy a smaller unit for field work

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  • Broccoli1
    replied
    Originally posted by Franz© View Post
    Speaking of transistor radios, what ever became of all those foot locker sized window shaking devices young males with sagging pants used to lug around on their shoulders?
    I always thought one of them would pe perfect for a shop radio strapped to the wall.
    Beats headphones.

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  • Franz©
    replied
    Speaking of transistor radios, what ever became of all those foot locker sized window shaking devices young males with sagging pants used to lug around on their shoulders?
    I always thought one of them would pe perfect for a shop radio strapped to the wall.

    Leave a comment:


  • Broccoli1
    replied
    a small multiprocess machine ain't the end of the world. He has a IM230 for his shop work now- and a portable machine is nice to have for field work.

    I'd probably look at a 120.240v machine though- unfortunately mo' money but you wont need to hump a generator around.

    'tis like a transiiter radio to your stereo console

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    Originally posted by caleb90 View Post

    will see how is goes, if i like it great! but if noti can always sell and go bigger i guess. im still looking at off brand 200amp multi process welders for work out side the shop. the firepower 180i is catching my eye, made by esab can run off a genny and 671$ off amazon
    Just speculating here, but I'd bet a buck you ain't old enough to remember home entertainment consoles with Radio, TV & Record changer.
    Took 2 strong men and a truck to haul them things to the shop when they had to go on for service.
    Extrapolate that to a welding/cutting/whatever machine, and when any component goes south you got NUTTIN.

    I'll also repeat, 200 amps is about all you need for work you can do at home and all you can power at home as well; Unless you have a 200 amp 3Ø service in your home shop. Yes, I do, and I can easily run a 400 amp Hobart Bros MIG, a couple Lincoln verticals, the air compressor, and saw with a couple helpers.

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  • caleb90
    replied
    Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
    Hope it works out well for you. It is the decision I would have made, but each of us has to decide for himself. If I had not found my MM200, I would have bought the Ironman.
    will see how is goes, if i like it great! but if noti can always sell and go bigger i guess. im still looking at off brand 200amp multi process welders for work out side the shop. the firepower 180i is catching my eye, made by esab can run off a genny and 671$ off amazon

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Hope it works out well for you. It is the decision I would have made, but each of us has to decide for himself. If I had not found my MM200, I would have bought the Ironman.

    Leave a comment:


  • caleb90
    replied
    well i decided on the ironman 230. should be here this week. will see if im kicking my self in the butt for not spending the extra 400 for the bigger class machine.

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  • caleb90
    replied
    Originally posted by Franz© View Post
    Point of order- Japan bought both the Navy and training program they used to whup up on Russia in the opening years of the 20th Century. You might call that copying, but Japan was the only Navy to have Weather FAX on the bridge of capitol ships and carriers in 1940. At the end of the War Japan embraced Deming while the US shunned his concepts. Who won?

    Cornell University began building a major presence in China over 20 years ago. Today while Engineering Professors polish desk chairs in Ithaca the majority of Engineering classes are taught by Chinese instructors via Internet. Students & Grads I know tell me the Chinese are brilliant and spend twice the hours US students do studying.

    Colt built and fine tuned the state of the art alloy steel plant on US soil 40 years back. Regulations and costs caused Colt to close that plant in 5 years. Employees wanted to buy and run the plant, but tax laws made that impossible and environmental regulations coming into play were going to make keeping the plant producing a nightmare. All that technology left the US.

    Look at Rochester, 4 of 5 Power generating plants closed and demolished and replacement of that power comes from where? If a miracle happens and all the jobs come back at Midnight where will the power come from to turn the lights on in the factory buildings that haven't been demolished?
    the way the libs want it

    Leave a comment:


  • caleb90
    replied
    Originally posted by MasterKwan View Post

    If you look at welder tech, it certainly looks like the Chinese are ahead of the game. Every up and coming nation started by imitating. We did it, the Japanese did it and the Chinese had to do it to get things going. Then once that period is over, innovation starts. Japan was once known as a nation of copy-cats. They're not thought that way anymore.

    I would certainly love to buy American but what happens when it's not American any more and it's not that quality it once was? My last Ford was made in Canada and ended up being a lemon. My current Hondas were all built in Ohio.

    if looking for a 200 amp or less inverter machine, then yes i agree. both will last the same time frame, and can buy two of the chinese ones for the cost of name brand. but for a 200amp + machine with old transformers i still believe american is the way to go. the chinese off brand machines thay are 200 amp plus are still iverters with the same torches from the 150 amp or 200 amp class machines. doombed to fail

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    Point of order- Japan bought both the Navy and training program they used to whup up on Russia in the opening years of the 20th Century. You might call that copying, but Japan was the only Navy to have Weather FAX on the bridge of capitol ships and carriers in 1940. At the end of the War Japan embraced Deming while the US shunned his concepts. Who won?

    Cornell University began building a major presence in China over 20 years ago. Today while Engineering Professors polish desk chairs in Ithaca the majority of Engineering classes are taught by Chinese instructors via Internet. Students & Grads I know tell me the Chinese are brilliant and spend twice the hours US students do studying.

    Colt built and fine tuned the state of the art alloy steel plant on US soil 40 years back. Regulations and costs caused Colt to close that plant in 5 years. Employees wanted to buy and run the plant, but tax laws made that impossible and environmental regulations coming into play were going to make keeping the plant producing a nightmare. All that technology left the US.

    Look at Rochester, 4 of 5 Power generating plants closed and demolished and replacement of that power comes from where? If a miracle happens and all the jobs come back at Midnight where will the power come from to turn the lights on in the factory buildings that haven't been demolished?

    Leave a comment:


  • MasterKwan
    replied
    However, when there is no more american technology to pirate
    If you look at welder tech, it certainly looks like the Chinese are ahead of the game. Every up and coming nation started by imitating. We did it, the Japanese did it and the Chinese had to do it to get things going. Then once that period is over, innovation starts. Japan was once known as a nation of copy-cats. They're not thought that way anymore.

    I would certainly love to buy American but what happens when it's not American any more and it's not that quality it once was? My last Ford was made in Canada and ended up being a lemon. My current Hondas were all built in Ohio.


    Leave a comment:

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